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Tyler Mary Period 4 9/26/2011 Describe and analyze the changes of the role of Parliament in English politics between the succession of James I and the.

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Presentation on theme: "Tyler Mary Period 4 9/26/2011 Describe and analyze the changes of the role of Parliament in English politics between the succession of James I and the."— Presentation transcript:

1 Tyler Mary Period 4 9/26/2011 Describe and analyze the changes of the role of Parliament in English politics between the succession of James I and the Glorious Revolution.

2 Background Information After Elizabeth I, she gave the English throne to her cousin, James Stuart (James I) After Elizabeth I, she gave the English throne to her cousin, James Stuart (James I) James I was not favorable by the English people, mainly because he was Scottish and the English had a disposition towards the Scottish at that time. James I also ruled Scotland for thirty-five years. James I was not favorable by the English people, mainly because he was Scottish and the English had a disposition towards the Scottish at that time. James I also ruled Scotland for thirty-five years.

3 Influence on the Parliament Changes Under James I’s rule Demonstrated power and authority over the people, liberty, and properties of English citizens, an idea that was contrast to that of the House of Commons for many years. Demonstrated power and authority over the people, liberty, and properties of English citizens, an idea that was contrast to that of the House of Commons for many years. Following this, James I believed he had jurisdiction of the House of Commons, and since the House of Commons controlled most of the countries money, James I could now access that money, and he used most of it to do things in order to gain public support (spent money on court favorites) Following this, James I believed he had jurisdiction of the House of Commons, and since the House of Commons controlled most of the countries money, James I could now access that money, and he used most of it to do things in order to gain public support (spent money on court favorites) Elizabeth I had left the parliament feeling strong, and that they should have influence on the countries affairs, while James I and his son, Charles I, believed they had greater powers than that of Parliament. Elizabeth I had left the parliament feeling strong, and that they should have influence on the countries affairs, while James I and his son, Charles I, believed they had greater powers than that of Parliament.

4 Economic Changes during James and Charles's rule Impact on the English Parliament During James and Charles reign, they took many steps to increasing wealth within their citizens, and England became mostly capitalist in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries (Investing money to make more money). Ultimately, this resulted in a well-educated and articulate Parliament who wanted political power to match their wealth. During James and Charles reign, they took many steps to increasing wealth within their citizens, and England became mostly capitalist in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries (Investing money to make more money). Ultimately, this resulted in a well-educated and articulate Parliament who wanted political power to match their wealth. The Parliament had the ability to control their own taxes, and the English monarchy found this as unacceptable and it threatened their power over their god-given right which was that “god had appointed them to rule in the name of god”. This led to refusal of the crown and the Parliament to work together, and caused the country of England under Charles I’s rule to plunge into a crisis after he tried to govern without parliament. The Parliament had the ability to control their own taxes, and the English monarchy found this as unacceptable and it threatened their power over their god-given right which was that “god had appointed them to rule in the name of god”. This led to refusal of the crown and the Parliament to work together, and caused the country of England under Charles I’s rule to plunge into a crisis after he tried to govern without parliament.

5 Charles I’s rejection of Parliament from Impact on Parliament Charles I created major stopgap levies as an alternative to using the money he received from parliament, and this was considered illegal to the English people, but when tested in court, the judges favored the crown because they had been bribed, and the cases were thrown out. Charles I created major stopgap levies as an alternative to using the money he received from parliament, and this was considered illegal to the English people, but when tested in court, the judges favored the crown because they had been bribed, and the cases were thrown out. Parliament reacted that they believed that this taxation was unacceptable and would lead to the king ultimately controlling all of the power in England. Because of this, they did not trust the king who possessed an army, and they initiated any laws that restricted the power of the king, which made it impossible for the monarchy to possess all of the power. Such actions would lead to violence over disagreement in England. Parliament reacted that they believed that this taxation was unacceptable and would lead to the king ultimately controlling all of the power in England. Because of this, they did not trust the king who possessed an army, and they initiated any laws that restricted the power of the king, which made it impossible for the monarchy to possess all of the power. Such actions would lead to violence over disagreement in England.

6 The English Civil War ( ) Causes, Motives, and Results Rebellion in Ireland due to religious motives, and fear of a Scottish invasion caused the need for Charles I to have an army to stop this rebellion, and combat the Scottish threat. However, the Parliament was unwilling to grant Charles an army, and this led to the monarchy drafting nobility, as well as mercenaries, cavalry staff, and rural gentry for his own military. The purpose of this army was to combat the Parliamentary forces. The war lasted for nine years between Charles I and Parliament. Rebellion in Ireland due to religious motives, and fear of a Scottish invasion caused the need for Charles I to have an army to stop this rebellion, and combat the Scottish threat. However, the Parliament was unwilling to grant Charles an army, and this led to the monarchy drafting nobility, as well as mercenaries, cavalry staff, and rural gentry for his own military. The purpose of this army was to combat the Parliamentary forces. The war lasted for nine years between Charles I and Parliament. The civil war ended in 1649, resulting in the execution of Charles, and this action created an impact on the theory that the monarchy has the “power given by god” to control their land. This did not end the problem, but it initiated a new era from The civil war ended in 1649, resulting in the execution of Charles, and this action created an impact on the theory that the monarchy has the “power given by god” to control their land. This did not end the problem, but it initiated a new era from

7 The “Interregnum” Period ( ) Actions and Events Following the beheading of Charles I, England was proclaimed to be a republic, the government was originally supposed to run as the legislative power of the republic was controlled by Parliament, and the executive power was in a council of state. Following the beheading of Charles I, England was proclaimed to be a republic, the government was originally supposed to run as the legislative power of the republic was controlled by Parliament, and the executive power was in a council of state. However, the army that defeated the royal forces during the English Civil War, controlled the government, and the army’s leader, Oliver Cromwell ruled as a dictator in England, and the influence of the Parliament was overrun by his rule. However, the army that defeated the royal forces during the English Civil War, controlled the government, and the army’s leader, Oliver Cromwell ruled as a dictator in England, and the influence of the Parliament was overrun by his rule. The “Instrument of Government” was essentially a constitution, and one of the key points was to give Parliament the power to control taxes. However, throughout disputes concerning the document, Cromwell tore it up. The “Instrument of Government” was essentially a constitution, and one of the key points was to give Parliament the power to control taxes. However, throughout disputes concerning the document, Cromwell tore it up. Rather than a Parliament, England was divided into twelve military districts, and the generals ultimately had the power within a district. Rather than a Parliament, England was divided into twelve military districts, and the generals ultimately had the power within a district.

8 The Restoration of Parliament and the English Monarchy Beginning of Establishment Following the rule of the Cromwell dictatorship from , the monarchy was ready to be restored in England, beginning with the king Charles II, the eldest son of Charles I. Following the rule of the Cromwell dictatorship from , the monarchy was ready to be restored in England, beginning with the king Charles II, the eldest son of Charles I. The two houses of Parliament were restored, and they established the Anglican church, the courts of law, and local government through justices of peace. The two houses of Parliament were restored, and they established the Anglican church, the courts of law, and local government through justices of peace. One issue still effected the Parliament which was the relationship of the Parliament and the king, which had not been resolved for years. One issue still effected the Parliament which was the relationship of the Parliament and the king, which had not been resolved for years.

9 Parliament and Charles II Actions and Relationship The beginning of the Restoration had new hope for peace within the Parliament and the king. Charles II set out to get along with parliament, contradictory to some kings of the past. The beginning of the Restoration had new hope for peace within the Parliament and the king. Charles II set out to get along with parliament, contradictory to some kings of the past. “The Cabal” was a council of five appointed men who were the kings advisors, and members of the Parliament. This connected the executive and legislature of England, as well as improved the relationship between the king and Parliament. “The Cabal” was a council of five appointed men who were the kings advisors, and members of the Parliament. This connected the executive and legislature of England, as well as improved the relationship between the king and Parliament. This put into action that royal ministers must answer to the House Of Commons, and the Cabal were answerable for the actions of the king. This put into action that royal ministers must answer to the House Of Commons, and the Cabal were answerable for the actions of the king. The relationship remained strong due to the fact that Charles II would summon meetings frequently with the parliament to grant him money. Ultimately they did not grant him enough, and Charles II looked to the French for financial support, and in return there would be some changes in England to turn them to Catholicism. Parliament would reject these changes, but Charles II overruled Parliament. The relationship remained strong due to the fact that Charles II would summon meetings frequently with the parliament to grant him money. Ultimately they did not grant him enough, and Charles II looked to the French for financial support, and in return there would be some changes in England to turn them to Catholicism. Parliament would reject these changes, but Charles II overruled Parliament.

10 The Glorious Revolution ( ) Impact on the Parliament Following the events of Charles II’s involvement with the French and Roman Catholicism, It was established in England that the power of the country should remain between the Parliament, and the king. The king was to rule with the approval of the Parliament. Following the events of Charles II’s involvement with the French and Roman Catholicism, It was established in England that the power of the country should remain between the Parliament, and the king. The king was to rule with the approval of the Parliament. The English Bill of Rights contained specific rules of how the king should operate under authority of Parliament. This included that laws should be made through parliament, and the king can not overrule them. It also included that Parliament was to be called every three years. Elections and Debates in Parliament could not be influence by the king. The English Bill of Rights contained specific rules of how the king should operate under authority of Parliament. This included that laws should be made through parliament, and the king can not overrule them. It also included that Parliament was to be called every three years. Elections and Debates in Parliament could not be influence by the king. This revolution gave the Parliament influence in England politics that they had always wanted. This revolution gave the Parliament influence in England politics that they had always wanted.

11 Conclusion & Results Beginning with James I, who got the majority of England wealthy and powerful, the English Parliament was always looking for their share of political power. The Parliament had been suppressed by the actions of kings for years, including James I, Charles I, and the dictator Oliver Cromwell. It was not until the rule of Charles II that the Parliament and king began to get along. True sovereignty for the Parliament was during the Glorious Revolution. The creation of the English Bill of Rights gave the Parliament Political power that they had been striving to achieve since the rule of James I and political power in England was finally balanced with the Parliament and king.


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