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C HANGING THE WAY WE PREPARE SPECIAL EDUCATION LEADERS : S CHOOL / UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS Suzanne M. Martin, Ph. D. Jonathan McIntire, Ph. D. Tracy McKinney,

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Presentation on theme: "C HANGING THE WAY WE PREPARE SPECIAL EDUCATION LEADERS : S CHOOL / UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS Suzanne M. Martin, Ph. D. Jonathan McIntire, Ph. D. Tracy McKinney,"— Presentation transcript:

1 C HANGING THE WAY WE PREPARE SPECIAL EDUCATION LEADERS : S CHOOL / UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS Suzanne M. Martin, Ph. D. Jonathan McIntire, Ph. D. Tracy McKinney, Doctoral Candidate Jillian Gourwitz, Doctoral Student University of Central Florida

2 LEADERS OF CHANGE “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter F. Drucker

3 NEED FOR CHANGE “A shortage of any type of leader can seriously hamper the field’s infrastructure and hinder improved results of students with disabilities” (Smith, Robb, West and Tyler, 2010, p. 26).

4 “Special education administrators play a critical role in the implementation of successful inclusion in diverse, standards- based environments. They provide the vision and leadership necessary to guide educators in both general and special education as they deliver instructional programs to meet the needs of diverse students with disabilities.” (Voltz and Collins, 2010, p. 70) NEED

5 Critical need for school districts and school leaders to have:  full access to the best available research and practical wisdom  receive strong support in transforming that knowledge into high-quality performance and  serve as an internal advocate with your general education leadership peers  continuous improvement for themselves and for those they lead

6 THE FOCUS OF OUR WORK  to address the critical gaps between the traditional preparation of urban special education mid-level administrators  the skills, knowledge and dispositions needed for full implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) of 2004.

7 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS Essential elements for organizing schools:  school leadership,  welcoming attitude toward parents,  quality of teaching staff,  safe learning climate, and  strong instructional guidance as essential elements for success. Bryk, Bender Sebring, Allensworth, Luppescu and Easton (2009) Organizing Schools For Improvement: Lessons from Chicago. The University of Chicago Press

8 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS  “Leadership is an essential ingredient for ensuring that every child in America gets the educa­tion they need to succeed” (Wallace Foundation (2007) A Bridge to School Reform. The Wallace Foundation National Conference. New York, New York, pp )

9 CHALLENGES  “Graduates must be adept at addressing the special challenges of class, race, ethnicity, and language background, all concentrated in urban schools” ( Grubb & Tredway (2010)A School Leadership “Crisis” Despite Remedies. Education Week, January 19, 2010)

10 LEADERS OF CHANGE Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off the goal. Henry Ford

11 CHALLENGES Most university programs that prepare school administrators range in quality from “adequate to poor” (Archer, 2005, p.1). DiPaola and Walther-Thomas (2002) found that leadership at the school level was identified as crucial to success.

12 LEADERS OF CHANGE “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” Albert Einstein

13 G OALS Design and deliver the program-12 doctoral level special education leaders, ; 14 doctoral special education leaders, Create a cadre of experts in special education to act as members of a National Faculty for the model; Develop and disseminate a model of high-quality preparation and support for mid-level special education leaders in urban settings.

14 K EY COMPONENTS  Quality preparation leading to an Ed.D. degree  Cohort model  Highly qualified mentors and national faculty closely supporting participants throughout program  Travel and support for Harvard institute and national conferences  Tuition and stipends paid

15 N ATIONAL F ACULTY C HARACTERISTICS  Collaboration and problem solving skills;  Instructional leadership in urban special education settings;  Interpersonal relationship building;  Family involvement;  Verbal and written communication;

16 N ATIONAL F ACULTY C HARACTERISTICS Knowledge of cultural diversity in the global learning community; Knowledge of research-based instructional practices; leadership skills; Research related to implementing and sustaining positive change; Data driven decisions

17 M ENTORS C HARACTERISTICS  Understand the process of obtaining a doctorate  Be Supportive  Show Commitment  Show Respect  Be People oriented  Motivate  Be an effective teacher  Be an achiever  Demonstrate ability to provide visibility  Values education and work

18 S TATUS OF P ROJECT  Twelve graduates of NUSELI project  Project funded for  Eight new participants recruited for summer 2012  Hosted first NUSELI/CASE Winter Institute

19 S TATUS OF P ROJECT  Harvard July 2012  Study of mentor component  Ten national presentations  Three state presentations  Planning to resubmit project for future funding

20 S UCCESS OF P ROJECT Former mentor/current advisory board member appointed Superintendent of Orange County Public Schools (10 th largest district in country) Participant promoted to Exceptional Education Director for the county (10 th largest district in country) Participant promoted to one of five Area Superintendents(10th largest district in country) Participant promoted to Principal of Multilingual Pre-K through 5 school

21 C URRENT R ESEARCH Conducting qualitative review of transcripts from participants and their mentors Surveying CASE members on characteristics of leaders Videotaping new participants and their mentors Analyzing survey results from principals in OCPS to assist in determining profession development needs of principals concerning students with disabilities Searching for National Faculty

22 R EFERENCES  Archer, A. (2005). Education Week, March 16,  Bryk, A., Bender-Sebring, P., Allensworth, E., Luppescu, S., & Eastom, J. (2009) Organizing schools for improvement: Lessons fro Chicago. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.  Covey, S. (1989). The 7 Habits of Highly effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change. Free Press: New York  DiPaola and Walther-Thomas (2002).Principals and special education: The critical role of school leaders. Council of Chief State School Officers [CCSSO] Report.  DeVita, C. (2007). Leadership: The Bridge to Better Learning. A Bridge to School Reform. The Wallace Foundation National Conference. New York, New York, pp. 4-7.

23 R EFERENCES  Grubb & Tredway (2010). A School Leadership “Crisis” Despite Remedies. Education Week, page  Samuels, C. (2008). Principals group updates standards for leadership. March 19,  Smith, D., Robb, S., West, J., & Tyler, N. (2010). The changing educational landscape: How special education leadership preparation can make a difference for teachers and their students with disabilities. Teacher Education and Special Education. 33(1),  Voltz, D. & Collins, L. (2010). Preparing special education administrators for inclusion in divers, standard-based contexts: Beyond the council for exceptional children and the interstate school leaders licensure consortium. 33(1),  Wallace Foundation (2007). A Bridge to School Reform. The Wallace Foundation National Conference. New York, New York, pp

24 W HAT THE PARTICIPANTS THINK OF L EADERSHIP


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