Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Bibliography American Library Association (2013b). John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award. Retrieved from:

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Bibliography American Library Association (2013b). John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award. Retrieved from:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Bibliography American Library Association (2013b). John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award. Retrieved from: Futterman, M. (2008). Finding the underserved. Library Journal, 133(17), See full text for a complete list of sources consulted in this project. Conclusion Access and targeted marketing are not mutually exclusive. Targeted marketing is a tool that can be used to expand access to the most underserved populations in a library’s service area. Although the world that the library exists in continues to change at an increasingly rapid pace, the core values of access and service that have long defined the American public library tradition live on and continue to prosper. By updating the tools in the public library’s marketing tool kit, it can better prepare itself for the future. Abstract This study analyzed winners of the John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award from The study hoped to determine whether targeted marketing had become a part of public libraries’ outreach campaigns. After analyzing 23 winning submissions, it became clear that successful libraries used targeted marketing. The connection was strongest when libraries conducted programs whose goal was to increase patron access. This conclusion suggests libraries need to embrace a three- pronged model of access: patrons must have the right to access the library, the ability to access the library, and knowledge of the library’s services. A targeted access approach will better address patrons' needs to know about library services. This works to dispel ignorance as a barrier to library services in targeted groups. Thus, this model suggests that libraries can increase patrons' access to services while remaining judicious stewards of limited marketing dollars. Method The sample of campaigns considered in this paper came from the archives of the John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award from the years of 2009 through 2013 that were awarded to public libraries. The awards were given for “outstanding public relations” in the sphere of library work, and were awarded based on submitted awards packets that comprised an application and evidence materials (American Library Association, 2013). Awards given to both individual branches and to entire public library systems were considered while awards given to ancillary groups (Friends of the library, trustees, etc.) were not. The full applications from these institutions for consideration of the award contain a narrative of their goals and practices for the years of 2012 and 2013 while only synopses of the winning projects were available for the other years. Data was extrapolated based on available resources. Analysis There are 24 John Cotton Dana Public Relations Award (JCDLPRA) winners from the public library world from Of those winners, only one winner was repeated twice (King County Public Library). For the purposes of this analysis, a segment was considered targeted if the library specifically mentioned interaction and engagement with a certain subset of the population as a goal of their marketing efforts. Efforts that targeted the entire community (through generalized advertising and other efforts) were not considered targeted marketing. Of the 24 winners, 13 public libraries (54%) participated in some form of targeted marketing during the campaign for which they received a JCDLPRA while 11 (46%) did not. Teenagers and the arts community were the only groups to be targeted to by more than one winner. Other targeted groups included local food consumers, farms, music researchers, Hispanics, non-library users in agriculture and technology, food service workers, the unemployed, patrons with large fines, early readers, men, and subpar adult readers. The diversity of targeted groups illustrates the idea that what counts as a segment does not necessarily equate to a part of a patron’s demographic profile (Futterman, 2008). Few specifically referenced the fact that they were planning their marketing efforts with a goal of increased access, the success statements, the increased usage statistics, and the increased patron satisfaction all imply that these more targeted efforts led to an increase in patron’s library satisfaction and access ability. A New Model of Access The JCDLPRA winners examined in this study calls for a new model of access in the public library sector. The current model says that access is ensured when services are provided to the public that has the right and ability to access the library. However, this study suggests a better model of access would comprise three parts: 1.The right to access the library, 2.The ability to access the library, and 3.Knowledge of library services Just as lack of ability or rights to access the library would block user’s access, lack of knowledge can equally curtail access. Targeted marketing can work to alleviate this problem by targeting ignorance in selected groups. Access and marketing cannot be seen as a zero-sum game. Instead, targeted marketing enhances the access of the targeted group by providing services that meet their needs and by informing them of the existence of these products. Without this focus, these needs (and thus these patrons) would continue to go underserved in the future. Targeted marketing does not lessen access for the community; rather, it is a gateway process through which different subsections of the population are brought into the public library’s sphere. As can be seen through the example of the JCDLPRA winners, many successful public library programs already consider targeting a specific segment of their patron base as part of the planning of new offerings and events. Targeting the right individuals with the right services at the right time served as a gateway to library usage by these individuals and groups. How Targeted Marketing Impacts Access Ideals: An Analysis of John Cotton Dana Public Relations Award Winners from 2009 to 2013 John Mack Freeman Faculty Mentor: Dr. Linda R. MostDepartment: Library and Information Science Practical Recommendations In addition to the theoretical shift in models of access, this study also provided several practical recommendations that public libraries could undertake immediately, including: Reassessing marketing as a core responsibility of all staff members through training and new professional standards Creating new marketing collateral with a specific emphasis on targeting underserved communities that takes into consideration the needs of those groups Developing or remodelling of existing services to match specific targeted groups


Download ppt "Bibliography American Library Association (2013b). John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award. Retrieved from:"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google