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CAPITOL PARK COMMUNITY HEALTH SURVEY Warren A. Rhodes, Ph.D., Agnes Richardson, DLS., Sheridan Kingsberry, Ph.D. Institute for Public Health & Policy,

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Presentation on theme: "CAPITOL PARK COMMUNITY HEALTH SURVEY Warren A. Rhodes, Ph.D., Agnes Richardson, DLS., Sheridan Kingsberry, Ph.D. Institute for Public Health & Policy,"— Presentation transcript:

1 CAPITOL PARK COMMUNITY HEALTH SURVEY Warren A. Rhodes, Ph.D., Agnes Richardson, DLS., Sheridan Kingsberry, Ph.D. Institute for Public Health & Policy, Delaware State University Shirley Westley, Maryann Wiltbank, Dorothy Havenson, Capitol Park Community Health Committee ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION Participants N = 62 African-Americans Capitol Park residents 37% were male and 63% were female Age = ranged from 19 to 80 years old 52% of the study participants age 50 or older, 27% between 36 and 49 years old, and 21% between ages 18 and 35. RESULTS METHODS CONCLUSIONS The present study represents the first step in the community-based participatory research process between the Capitol Park, a predominantly African-American community located in Dover, Delaware, and Delaware State University, a historically black university, noted for servicing the minority community. The study participants indicated that diseases with the greatest disparities require more information and screenings for this community. Based on the current findings, DSU can provide health promotion activities to the Capitol Park residents. However, answers to critical questions can provide direction for these health promotion activities. This mixed-methods exploratory study addressed healthcare disparities issues in the Capitol Park community. The researchers obtained information regarding study participants’: (a) current health status, (b) source of care, (c) satisfaction with care, (d) access to a health care facility, (e) perception of health care needs being met, (f) interest in learning more about health related topics, and (g) willingness to attend health promotion and educational services at the Capitol Park Community Center (CPCC). The Capitol Park Community Health Survey originated from two sources: Healthy People 2010 Leading Health Indicators (DHHS, 2000) and healthcare priorities identified by the State of Delaware (Jacobson, Jaeger, Ratledge, & Gladders, 2005). The two-page survey was comprised of multiple-choice and open-ended questions. Participants rated their current health, access to healthcare, and interest in learning more about 13 health topics (e.g., diabetes, breast cancer, smoking cessation, etc.). Further, study participants identified their interest in coming back to CPCC for specific health care screenings (e.g., blood pressure, cholesterol). Compelling evidence exist that minority communities suffer from increasing healthcare disparities vs. whites. Many health disparities correlate strongly with socioeconomic status; however, racial and ethnic health disparities may persist even after controlling for socioeconomic factors. Since the latter part of the nineteenth century, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have played a critical, life-saving role in Black communities. Today, the ongoing issue of healthcare disparities presents HBCUs with another opportunity to reach out to underserved populations through research aimed at discovering methods for insuring that Blacks and other minority groups have equal access to quality healthcare. This mixed-methods exploratory study is the first step in addressing healthcare disparities in the Capitol Park community, a minority community in Kent County, Delaware. The study findings revealed that Capitol Park community residents desire more healthcare services and health education than they currently receive and that a partnership between Delaware State University and the Capitol Park Civic Association maybe an effective means for providing services that in the long-term contribute to reducing healthcare disparities for the Capitol Park community. Compelling evidence indicate that minority communities suffer from increasing differences in the incidence, prevalence, mortality, and burden of diseases and other adverse health conditions vs. White communities (U. S. Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2000). Blacks and other minorities continue to experience significant health disparities, including shorter life expectancy and higher rates of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, stroke, substance abuse, infant mortality, and low birth weight. Since the latter part of the nineteenth century, HBCUs have played a critical life-saving role in Black communities. For example, Meharry Medical College, founded in 1876, began as a medical department at Central Tennessee College when freed slaves in Nashville were threatened by an outbreak of smallpox and pneumonia. Meharry Medical College educated freed slaves as healthcare professionals. Meharry’s undertaking addressed a population ignored by the White medical establishment and actively recruited Blacks into the medical profession. Today, the ongoing issue of healthcare disparities presents HBCUs with another opportunity to reach out to underserved populations through research aimed at discovering methods for ensuring that Blacks and other minority groups have equal access to quality healthcare. Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR), a collaborative research process involving researchers and community representatives, positions HBCUs, through these community partnerships, to make successful strides in the reduction of healthcare disparities in communities across the country (Reid, Hatch & Parrish, 2003). Using CBPR, Delaware State University, a HBCU, and the Capitol Park Civic Association developed a partnership to reduce healthcare disparities for the residents of this minority community starting with identifying the healthcare areas that residents desired additional services and information. DISCUSSIONPURPOSE To examine the healthcare needs of Capitol Park residents as a first step towards reducing healthcare disparities for the residents of this minority community. Based on the findings of this study, diabetes, nutrition, hypertension, stress reduction, and weight control were the health topics participants have the most interest in receiving information. Additionally, participants expressed interest in receiving blood sugar and cholesterol screening. A major findings revealed by the study is that the Capitol Park Community residents who participated desire more healthcare services information than they currently receive. A surprising finding of the current study is that while most study participants were pleased with the healthcare they received, almost half of the participants rated their health status as less than good. This finding is cause for concern. Several questions are stimulated by the current study including: 1) Are these findings representative of the community? 2) What critical elements are participants using to judge satisfaction with their healthcare and health status? 2) Is their a relationship between the judged healthcare satisfaction and health status? 3) How valid is participant’s appraisal of their healthcare services and health status? The answers to these questions are critical and should provide direction for the next step in health promotion activities in the Capitol park community. Ages 18-35Ages 36-49Ages + 50Average Rating Diabetes Nutrition Hypertension Stress Reduction Weight Control Caring for Aging Parents Prostate Cancer Breast Cancer Smoking cessation Alcohol/Substance Abuse Cholesterol PARTICIPANTS REFERENCES Jacobson, E., Jaeger, J, Ratledge, E. C., & Gladders, B. (2005). Health disparities in Delaware 2004: An overview. Retrieved on November 28, 2006, from DOWNLOADABLE/ DOCUMENTS/mwuhealthdisp 09.pdf. Reid, L., Hatch, J., & Parrish, T. (2003). The role of a historically Black university and the Black church in community-based health initiatives: The Project DIRECT experience. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 9(3), U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2000). Healthy people 2010 (vols I & II). Washington, DC: Author. U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2000, October). Strategic research plan and budget to reduce and ultimately eliminate health disparities: Fiscal years (vol. 2). Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n. d.). Health disparities – closing the gap. Washington, DC: National Institutes of Health, National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities. \


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