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Assessing Communication Skills With People Who Are Deaf and Lower Functioning Greg Long, Ph.D. School of Allied Health and Communicative Disorders Northern.

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Presentation on theme: "Assessing Communication Skills With People Who Are Deaf and Lower Functioning Greg Long, Ph.D. School of Allied Health and Communicative Disorders Northern."— Presentation transcript:

1 Assessing Communication Skills With People Who Are Deaf and Lower Functioning Greg Long, Ph.D. School of Allied Health and Communicative Disorders Northern Illinois University DeKalb, IL

2 Overview Purpose-driven assessment Functional communication assessment – Rationale – Description – Application

3 Meet David Long, my brother

4 Why conduct the assessment? Diagnosis/classification Intervention

5 Traditional diagnostic approaches Determine presence or absence of a disorder Confirm assessments and diagnoses Provide prognostic information

6 Limitations to diagnostic approaches Heavy emphasis on standardization and norm groups Clinic-based administration – Limited sample of behavior assessed – Generalization questionable

7 Evaluator issues Background knowledge of deafness, language development, and disability Skills, especially sign language Reliability between assessors

8 Assessing to intervene Target functional skills – Focus on age-appropriate skills Congruence between individuals and environments

9 Rationale for functional assessment Communication environments vary Mode is less important than success Logical progression from evaluation to intervention

10 Four-Step Approach 1. Develop a communication profile 2. Describe the communicative environment 3. Determine discrepancies 4. Plan interventions

11 Developing a Communication Profile Develop composite picture of the individual’s background, abilities, and interests related to communication

12 Data collection strategies Case review Interviews Observations Collaboration

13 Background Info Hearing loss Health and secondary disability info Current and prior living situation Educational background Employment history

14 Preferences? Speech/speech reading Sign Fingerspelling Gestures and pantomime Drawing and showing pictures Reading/writing Communication devices

15 How does the individual… Greet others Get people’s attention Express likes and dislikes Ask questions Express displeasure, frustration, and/or anger

16 Additional communication questions Types of spontaneous communication? Use turn-taking? Communication attempts with… – Deaf people – Hearing people

17 Specific communication skills and abilities Gestural and pantomimed communication – Ability to be understood? – Use and recognize facial expressions? Manual communication – Use? – Type of sign?

18 Receptive signing How well does the individual understand… – ASL signs? – English-based signs? – Instructions? – Yes/no questions? – Simple conversation? – Directions?

19 Expressive signing How well does the individual… – Use fingerspelling? – Produce clear and understandable signs? – Express ideas clearly? – Ask yes/no questions? – Participate in simple conversations?

20 Speech skills Use? Frequency? With whom? Intelligibility? – Familiar persons – Unfamiliar persons

21 Writing skills Use? Survival writing skills? – Name – Address Legibility

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24 Reading skills Use? Types of information read? Survival reading skills?

25 Interpreters Prior experience? Knowledge of – Role and duties – When to use – How to obtain – Payment

26 Assistive technology Experience and/or possibility of benefit Ability to maintain Any devices needed but not possessed? – Why? Skills and familiarity with assorted devices

27 Describe the Communicative Environment Determine the nature, type, amount, and importance of communication at a specific site

28 Data collection strategies Interviews with parents, teachers, professional staff, and/or employer(s) Observation

29 Observe communicative exchanges What was communicated? (topic) How was it communicated? (modality) Was the exchange successful? Who did most of the work to ensure understanding?

30 Process First, describe the environment in terms of physical barriers and supports Second, identify specific communication tasks needed for success

31 Barriers and supports Lighting Noise Visual distractions Accessible technology (e.g., captioning) Prior experience and knowledge

32 Identify communicative tasks What kinds of communication skills are needed in this setting? – Most frequently needed? – How critical are they? – Any required infrequently?

33 Prioritize communication tasks Obtain communication-related input from others at the job site Prioritize which communication skills are most important

34 Determine Discrepancies Most important communication skills? “Fit” between individual’s communication profile and environmental requirements? Identify mismatch(es) between needed skills and abilities.

35 Which skills are most important? Using the list of communication skills generated by the site analysis determine: – Importance of the skills – Whether it is possessed – If so, in what modality

36 Identify discrepancies Communication skills described as important but not possessed.

37 Prioritize discrepancies List all communication discrepancies Which skills are most important?

38 Plan Interventions Identify potential accommodations, interventions, and natural supports designed to reduce communication discrepancies

39 Individual considerations Consider individual’s learning style – What instructional strategies seem to work best? – Any strategies to be avoided? – Any significant barriers to learning?

40 Setting considerations Any characteristics of the environment that would tend to encourage or discourage the adoption of specific intervention strategies? Attitude toward accommodations?

41 Accommodations Should be: – chosen with the individual’s assistance – designed to promote individuality, independence, and autonomy – as inconspicuous as possible yet still effective

42 Potential accommodations Technology based – Visual or vibrating alerting devices – FM systems – Telephone amplifier – Smart phones/Text messaging – Closed captioning – Online assessment tool

43 Low tech – Picture books – PECS – Color coding – Drawings – Teacher notes – Maximize visual orientation to environment

44 Special services – Interpreters – Note takers – Itinerant teachers – Tutors

45 Natural supports – Sign language classes – Disability awareness education – Encourage creativity and use of gestures and pantomime – Participate in co-curricular activities

46 Summary Understand the individual’s communication skills Assess communication demands of the environment Compare the individual’s skills against site demands Intervene to create a best fit between the individual and environment

47 Application How might a functional communication assessment be used with a(n) – child in elementary school (Grades 1-5) – adolescent in middle school (Grades 6-9) – young adult considering vocational and employment options (Grades 10 and beyond)

48 Elementary school

49 Junior high school

50 Background Info Profound bilateral hearing loss Borderline intelligence, mild CP Lives with family Attended a day program, oral only

51 Preferences? Limited communication skills Best with written instructions No experience with communication devices

52 How does the individual… Greet others – needs encouragement Get people’s attention – seldom done, points Express likes and dislikes – says “good time” does not clearly express dislikes Ask questions – does not ask

53 Additional communication questions Very seldom communicates spontaneously Shows turn taking in play. Limited language does not support use with communication. Does not seem to recognize the difference between … – Deaf people – Hearing people

54 Specific communication skills and abilities Gestural and pantomimed communication – Basic nouns and verbs Mother, father, home, dog Come, eat, stop No meaningful knowledge or use of sign language

55 Speech skills Uses speech rarely. Able to clearly say his name and selected words (e.g., bathroom, ice tea, Greg) Intelligibility overall is generally poor.

56 Describe the classroom as a communicative environment Barriers to communication? Supports? Communicative tasks and requirements?

57 Likely discrepancies? What classroom skills would David need that he might not possess?

58 Interventions Where would you likely intervene? What strategies would be most helpful?

59 Transition, independence, employment

60 Receptive signing Does not understand connected signing. Able to answer yes/no questions. Frequently echolalic First consistent exposure to sign during his early 30s at SCHI

61 Expressive signing Fingerspells individual words well Signs are generally clear and understandable Basic needs expressed clearly Does not typically ask questions or comment on his environment. Minimal interest in other’s conversations.

62 Reading skills Able to read basic information (2 nd grade level) Likes to look at pictures Has survival reading skills Bus schedule

63 Writing skills Demonstrates survival writing skills – Name – Address Legibility is reasonably clear Understanding reciprocity of letter writing not consistently understood.

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66 Interpreters and assistive technology No experience beyond his hearing aid

67 Describe Chester’s Hamburgers as a communicative environment Barriers to communication? Supports? Communicative tasks and requirements?

68 Likely discrepancies? What communication skills would David need that he might not possess?

69 Interventions Where would you likely intervene? What strategies would be most helpful?


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