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Punctuation. Periods, Exclamation Marks, and Question Marks.

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Presentation on theme: "Punctuation. Periods, Exclamation Marks, and Question Marks."— Presentation transcript:

1 Punctuation

2 Periods, Exclamation Marks, and Question Marks

3 Periods Use a period at the end of a sentence. His cell phone had poor reception in the building. “I want to go to the movies tonight,” she said. Use a period after an abbreviation. Dr. Smith isn’t taking any new patients at this time. He turned left on Park Ave. and parked the car. Feb. 18, 1969 Port St. John Prof. Aaron Miller, Ph.D. Mr., Mrs., Ms., Rev., B.A., M.A., Jr., Sr. Note: You do not need a period after an abbreviation of a state. (For example, FL. is incorrect; FL is correct.)

4 Exclamation Marks Use an exclamation mark when you write about something that is exciting. The baby took her first steps today! I just won $1,000,000 in the lottery! Use an exclamation mark when you use an interjection. Wow! Can you believe the gas prices these days? “Hurray! Spring Break is next week,” he said happily. Be careful not to overuse the exclamation mark. In academic writing and news reporting, exclamation points are rare.

5 Question Marks Use a question mark at the end of a sentence that asks a question. Will you be coming over to our house after the game? When is your birthday? Do not use a question mark when the sentence is an indirect question. I asked my mother what was for dinner. I wonder what the weather will be like tomorrow. The teacher asked who threw the spitball.

6 Click on the correct punctuation at the bottom of the page. Will you be coming with us today __ I am so excited about going to Disney World __ Earth Day is on Apr__ 22. I wonder if they will come to the picnic ___ He wrote a novel about aliens and mermaids ___ “Hurray __ Tomorrow is Friday,” he exclaimed. When do you want to go shopping for new shoes ___.!? ? !... ! ? Next Slide Go Back & Review

7 Colons and Semicolons

8 Colons Use a colon to separate hours and minutes. 6:0010:3216:0223:34 Use a colon to separate chapters from verses in Scripture passages. John 3:16Numbers 6:24Psalm 150:6 Use a colon after a salutation of a formal or business letter. Dear Sir: To Whom It May Concern:

9 Colons Use a colon to introduce a list, especially when followed by the word “following”. She packed her bag with the following things: shorts, shirts, sandals, and suntan lotion. Jerome addressed his letter to the following people: Sam, Jane, Felicia, Antonio, and Bruce. Use a colon after an introductory expression before a formal statement. She quieted the students down and proclaimed: “From now on there will be no more food fights!” King Stephenson declared: “You will bow down and kiss my feet!”

10 Colons Use a colon before a long quotation. In his Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln said: “It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain - - that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

11 Semi-Colons Use a semi-colon when combining two independent clauses without using a conjunction. He wore his green shirt once a year; it was Saint Patrick’s Day. The bunny sniffed the carrot; he knew it would be tasty. Note: These sentences would also be correct if you put a period between them instead of a semi-colon.

12 Semi-Colons Use a semi-colon to combine two independent clauses when the second clause begins with “for example”, “however”, “namely”, “therefore”, and “for instance”. She didn’t like cheese; however, she did like to eat cheese pizza. His choice of books seems odd; for instance, he is currently reading The Cat in the Hat.

13 Semi-Colons Use a semi-colon between two independent clauses when commas have been used in one or more of the clauses. She loved roses, pansies, and daffodils; but she wanted tulips in her wedding. He loved to play hockey; although he excelled at baseball, football, basketball, and wrestling.

14 He packed the following things in his lunchbox _ a sandwich, a pickle, chips, and a Yoo-Hoo. Jean likes to water ski _ however, she cannot swim. She put the baby to bed at 7_45. Hector was a successful lawyer _ he had a lot of clients. She declared _ “I will not clean up after you anymore.” Becky bought prints by Van Gogh, Matisse, and Monet _ but what she really wanted to buy was one by Raphael. Click on the correct punctuation at the bottom of the page. :; : : ; ; : ; Next Slide Go Back & Review

15 Commas

16 Use a comma to separate words in a list. She bought ham, green beans, peas, and potatoes. Red, yellow, purple, and blue were his favorite colors. Use a comma to set off an introductory clause. Whenever it rains, their roof leaks. After they went to the movies, they went home.

17 Commas Use a comma to separate the two independent clauses of a compound sentence when connected by a conjunction. (and, but, or, nor, yet) He rode his bike, and then he went swimming. Caroline didn’t like spaghetti, but she did like linguine. Use a comma to set off words in a direct address. Stacey, will you buy the tickets? Will you please go with us, Susan?

18 Commas Use a comma to set off a direct quotation. Arnold asked, “Will you remember to lock the door?” “I don’t like bungee jumping,” she complained. “Something,” she whispered, “sounds fishy.” Use a comma to set off a phrase that interrupts the sentence. Her father, Thomas Dugan, had been a famous actor. The fox, sleek and cunning, chased after the hunting dog.

19 Commas Use a comma when writing the city and state or city and country. Melbourne, FLMelbourne, Australia New York, NYJohannesburg, South Africa Use a comma when writing the date. January 18, 2004August 15, 1998  Use a comma when writing numbers that are larger than three digits. 50,000 2,4521,000,043

20 Click on the sentence that uses commas correctly. Arnold, Jacob, Peter, and Carlos met at the gym to play basketball. Arnold Jacob Peter and Carlos, met at the gym, to play basketball. We are going to Cincinnati Ohio, on April, 23, 2007. We are going to Cincinnati, Ohio, on April 23, 2007. He got down on one, knee gave her the ring and, said “Will you marry me? He got down on one knee, gave her the ring, and said, “Will you marry me? On Wednesday, I have to go to the dentist before I go to work. On Wednesday, I have to go to the dentist, before, I go to work. Next Slide Go Back & Review Next Set

21 Quotation Marks, Apostrophes, and Parenthesis

22 Quotation Marks Put spoken words inside quotation marks. “I love spaghetti!” She said. His mother asked, “Did you do the laundry yet?” “I want to draw,” said the boy, “but I don’t have a pencil.”

23 Quotation Marks Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” “The Book of Psalms” “Masterpiece Theater” Put titles of short works in quotation marks. Examples of these would be chapters of books, short musical compositions or plays, works of art, or radio and television programs.

24 Apostrophes Use an apostrophe when indicating possession (owning something). Fay’s carStephen’s bookCarly’s cat Be careful of certain words which indicate possession without the use of an apostrophe: “its”, “your”, “our”, “their”, “my”, “mine”, etc. its furyour houseour vacation my biketheir farm

25 Apostrophes Use an apostrophe when writing a contraction. was not = wasn’thave not = haven’t it is = it’s I will = I’ll can not = can’tdoes not = doesn’t were not = weren’tdo not = don’t In formal writing, it is proper to write out the words instead of writing the contraction.

26 Parenthesis Use a set of parenthesis to include material that normally doesn’t fit into the sentence, but you want to include anyway. When do the children (the Girl Scouts) arrive? Someday we (my sisters and I) will go on a cruise. You can also put an entire sentence in parentheses, when the sentence is meant as an afterthought. (After all, no one’s perfect.) (She didn’t mean what she said, anyway.)

27 I don_t know if I can take classes this summer. The student raised his hand and said, _My brain is full._ Does she want to go with us _instead of driving alone_? We listened to _Symphony No. 40_ by Mozart. Melissa_s book got wet when she left it by the pool. _I know I will do well,_ he said confidently. Gregory was upset because we weren_t going to the zoo. _Do you want to buy a plane ticket to Hawaii?_ He asked. Click on the correct punctuation at the bottom of the page. ’“ ”( ) ” ‘ “ ”“ () “ ‘ ” ‘ “ Go Back & Review Next Slide ”

28 Review Use a period at the end of a sentence. Use a period after an abbreviation. Use a question mark at the end of a sentence that asks a question. Use an exclamation mark when writing about something that is exciting. Use an exclamation mark when using an interjection.

29 Review Use a colon to separate hours and minutes. Use a colon to separate chapters from verses in Scripture passages. Use a colon after a salutation of a formal or business letter. Use a colon to introduce a list, especially when followed by the word “following”.

30 Review Use a colon after an introductory expression before a formal statement. Use a colon before a long quotation. Use a semi-colon when combining two independent clauses without using a conjunction. Use a semi-colon to combine two independent clauses when the second clause begins with “for example”, “however”, “namely”, “therefore”, and “for instance.”

31 Review Use a comma to separate words in a list. Use a comma to set off an introductory clause. Use a comma to set off words in a direct address. Use a comma to set off a direct quotation. Use a comma to set off a phrase that interrupts the sentence. Use a comma to separate two independent clauses of a compound sentence when connected by a conjunction.

32 Review Use a comma when writing the city and state or city and country. Use a comma when writing the date. Use a comma when writing numbers that are larger than three digits. Put spoken words inside quotation marks. Put titles of short works in quotation marks.

33 Review Use an apostrophe when indicating possession (owning something). Use an apostrophe when writing a contraction. Use a set of parenthesis to include material that normally doesn’t fit into the sentence, but you want to include anyway.

34 As your use of punctuation improves, the better your writing will become.


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