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World War I US History Sarazin. Underlying Causes  Militarism policy of building up strong military forces to prepare for war Militarism  Alliances.

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Presentation on theme: "World War I US History Sarazin. Underlying Causes  Militarism policy of building up strong military forces to prepare for war Militarism  Alliances."— Presentation transcript:

1 World War I US History Sarazin

2 Underlying Causes  Militarism policy of building up strong military forces to prepare for war Militarism  Alliances - agreements between nations to aid and protect one another Alliances  Imperialism policy by which one country takes control of the economic and political affairs of another country Imperialism  Nationalism pride in or devotion to ones country Nationalism  Militarism policy of building up strong military forces to prepare for war Militarism  Alliances - agreements between nations to aid and protect one another Alliances  Imperialism policy by which one country takes control of the economic and political affairs of another country Imperialism  Nationalism pride in or devotion to ones country Nationalism

3 Secret Alliances  Triple Alliance: Germany, Austria- Hungary, Italy  Triple Entente: France, Russia, Great Britain  War in the Balkans: Serbia fighting for independence and Russia Backs Serbia  France and German Relations were sour since both planned for war  Triple Alliance: Germany, Austria- Hungary, Italy  Triple Entente: France, Russia, Great Britain  War in the Balkans: Serbia fighting for independence and Russia Backs Serbia  France and German Relations were sour since both planned for war

4 The Spark  Austrian prince Frances Ferdinand was assassinated in April of 1914 by a Serbian radical group “The Black hand”  He and his wife were gunned down in their automobile  This action set a massive round up of Serbs and triggered war in the Balkans. Russia back Serbia and Germany backs Austria Hungary  Austrian prince Frances Ferdinand was assassinated in April of 1914 by a Serbian radical group “The Black hand”  He and his wife were gunned down in their automobile  This action set a massive round up of Serbs and triggered war in the Balkans. Russia back Serbia and Germany backs Austria Hungary

5 The Schlieffen Plan  All sides had plans for war anticipating the conflict  Germany Schlieffen Plan called for a quick (5 week) defeat of France and then turn towards a slower mobilizing Russia.  All sides had plans for war anticipating the conflict  Germany Schlieffen Plan called for a quick (5 week) defeat of France and then turn towards a slower mobilizing Russia.

6 Leadership  Germany: Kaiser Wilhelm II  United States: Woodrow Wilson  Russia: Czar Nicholas II  Russia: Vladimir Lenin (Revolution)  John J Pershing (US General)  Germany: Kaiser Wilhelm II  United States: Woodrow Wilson  Russia: Czar Nicholas II  Russia: Vladimir Lenin (Revolution)  John J Pershing (US General)

7 The Continent at War  Germany combines with Prussia and takes imperial colonies like Czech.  Germany mobilizes its army and marches on neutral Belgium. It was a slaughter (new Weapons)  When Germany continues to threaten France they declare war on Germany and Austria Hungary.  Germany combines with Prussia and takes imperial colonies like Czech.  Germany mobilizes its army and marches on neutral Belgium. It was a slaughter (new Weapons)  When Germany continues to threaten France they declare war on Germany and Austria Hungary.

8 World War I Map ( )  0L3yNzk 0L3yNzk  Please label countries on the back of map who fought in the War on Allied Powers, Central Powers, and Neautral  Note Italy switching sides and Ottoman Turks joining central powers.  0L3yNzk 0L3yNzk  Please label countries on the back of map who fought in the War on Allied Powers, Central Powers, and Neautral  Note Italy switching sides and Ottoman Turks joining central powers.

9 Battles are horrible  The war would have 10 million battle casualties and an estimated 20 million people died from indirect consequences.  The Battle of the Marne saw 500,000 casualties.  The war would have 10 million battle casualties and an estimated 20 million people died from indirect consequences.  The Battle of the Marne saw 500,000 casualties.

10 Battles Continued  In August of 1914 a British Volunteer needed to be 5’8” in August.  By October 5’5” and then they suffered 40,000 casualties  By December 5’3”  In the first 3 months of war nearly the entire British Army was wiped out.  In August of 1914 a British Volunteer needed to be 5’8” in August.  By October 5’5” and then they suffered 40,000 casualties  By December 5’3”  In the first 3 months of war nearly the entire British Army was wiped out.

11 Trench Warfare  A stalemate existed as trench warfare developed as each side would push forward and then back as the corpses piled up  The battle of Verdun (1916) the Allies lost 600,000 men. One division had 1,000 men and came back with 83  A stalemate existed as trench warfare developed as each side would push forward and then back as the corpses piled up  The battle of Verdun (1916) the Allies lost 600,000 men. One division had 1,000 men and came back with 83

12 Battles  In July 1916, British General Douglas Haig ordered eleven divisions to climb out of their trenches.  6 German divisions opened up their machine guns and of the 110,000 who attacked 20,000 killed and 40,000 wounded leaving ghostly images in “No mans Land”  In the end the allies lost 400,000 men and gained 5 miles of territory  In July 1916, British General Douglas Haig ordered eleven divisions to climb out of their trenches.  6 German divisions opened up their machine guns and of the 110,000 who attacked 20,000 killed and 40,000 wounded leaving ghostly images in “No mans Land”  In the end the allies lost 400,000 men and gained 5 miles of territory

13 New Weapons Poison gas Tanks Large Scale Cannon U-Boats Flamethrowers!!!!! Machine Guns Airplane

14 The United States is Needed  President Wilson promised the American people Neutrality  “There is such thing as a nation being too proud to fight”  The Germans announce unrestricted Submarine Warfare  Was the US actually neutral?  President Wilson promised the American people Neutrality  “There is such thing as a nation being too proud to fight”  The Germans announce unrestricted Submarine Warfare  Was the US actually neutral?

15 The Lusitania  In 1915 the Lusitania is sunk by German U-Boats in 18 minutes killing 1,198 people (124 Americans)  The United States and Great Britain changed the cargo manifests  In actuality she was heavily armed with thousands of cases of ammunition.  The war had become big business for the United States  The Sussex Pledge - Declaration to continue  In 1915 the Lusitania is sunk by German U-Boats in 18 minutes killing 1,198 people (124 Americans)  The United States and Great Britain changed the cargo manifests  In actuality she was heavily armed with thousands of cases of ammunition.  The war had become big business for the United States  The Sussex Pledge - Declaration to continue

16 The Zimmmerman Note  The US did not directly get involved with incidents like the sinking of the Lusitania (1915) but it did impact public opinion.  The Germans declaration of unresticted warfare had an affect but the Zimmerman note put it over the edge.  Complete decoding activity  The US did not directly get involved with incidents like the sinking of the Lusitania (1915) but it did impact public opinion.  The Germans declaration of unresticted warfare had an affect but the Zimmerman note put it over the edge.  Complete decoding activity

17 The Zimmerman Note  The Zimmerman Note suggested a possible alliance between Mexico and Germany.  The connection to the western hemisphere was enough to make the US realize we were not going to stay out of this one.  Much like the Spanish American War though this was not a bad thing  “War is the health of the state”  The Zimmerman Note suggested a possible alliance between Mexico and Germany.  The connection to the western hemisphere was enough to make the US realize we were not going to stay out of this one.  Much like the Spanish American War though this was not a bad thing  “War is the health of the state”

18 The Draft The initial response by Americans was only about 73,000 enlisted and 1 million soldiers were needed. Congress passes the draft and push a drastic propaganda campaign. See example of propaganda posters in the US Powerpoint. Your thoughts on the draft? Then and now? The initial response by Americans was only about 73,000 enlisted and 1 million soldiers were needed. Congress passes the draft and push a drastic propaganda campaign. See example of propaganda posters in the US Powerpoint. Your thoughts on the draft? Then and now?

19 The US Changes the tide  The US commits 1 million Dough Boys to combat and with both sides depleted this was enough to swing the balance of power  Even with the Soviets backing out of the war in 1917 with their own revolution the Germans were not able to overcome the added strength of the US  The US commits 1 million Dough Boys to combat and with both sides depleted this was enough to swing the balance of power  Even with the Soviets backing out of the war in 1917 with their own revolution the Germans were not able to overcome the added strength of the US

20 The Espionage Act (1917)  The Espionage Act - would think it was on spying by title but also provided penalties of up to 20 years in prison for all of the following:  Shall willfully cause insubordination, disloyalty, mutiny, or refusal of duty in military or navel forces of the United States.  The Espionage Act - would think it was on spying by title but also provided penalties of up to 20 years in prison for all of the following:  Shall willfully cause insubordination, disloyalty, mutiny, or refusal of duty in military or navel forces of the United States.

21 People Arrested  Charles Schenck arrested for distributing 15,000 leaflets against the draft and the war. (sentence: 6 months)  Is he protected by the 1st amendment  Read the fire example and does this fit war?  Charles Schenck arrested for distributing 15,000 leaflets against the draft and the war. (sentence: 6 months)  Is he protected by the 1st amendment  Read the fire example and does this fit war?

22 Eugene Debs  Eugene Debs was a great orator and spoke out publicly against the war  “war has been waged for conquest and plunder…and that is war in a nutshell. The master class has declared the wars and the subject class fights them”  He was arrested because people of draft age were in the audience and that was obstructing them from service. He was convicted to 10 years in prison and not pardoned until 1921  Eugene Debs was a great orator and spoke out publicly against the war  “war has been waged for conquest and plunder…and that is war in a nutshell. The master class has declared the wars and the subject class fights them”  He was arrested because people of draft age were in the audience and that was obstructing them from service. He was convicted to 10 years in prison and not pardoned until 1921

23 Debate  A government needs to silence dissent when it is at war. Consider the following when defending or disagreeing with the resolution: purpose of war; quantity and quality of dissent; method of expression of dissent; threat to government’s war aims; threat to lives of soldiers; threat to civil rights to the future - relate to the passage of the patriot act today.


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