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University of Dayton Industrial Assessment Center Kelly Kissock, Ph.D., P.E. Professor and Chair, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering / Renewable and.

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Presentation on theme: "University of Dayton Industrial Assessment Center Kelly Kissock, Ph.D., P.E. Professor and Chair, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering / Renewable and."— Presentation transcript:

1 University of Dayton Industrial Assessment Center Kelly Kissock, Ph.D., P.E. Professor and Chair, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering / Renewable and Clean Energy Director: University of Dayton Industrial Assessment Center

2 Industrial Assessment Center Program  Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy –Program began during 1970s “energy crisis” –26 centers at universities throughout the U.S. –20 no-cost assessments per year for mid-sized industries  Goals: –Help industry be more resource-efficient and competitive –Train new engineers in industrial best-practices

3 Eligibility for No-Cost IAC Assessment  Manufacturing facility SIC: 20 to 39  Annual energy costs: $100,000 - $2,500,000

4 Other Assistance to Industry from D.O.E.  Save Energy Now program –http://www1.eere.energy.gov/industry/saveenergynow/  D.O.E. Software Tools –Screening: Quick PEP –Process heating: PHAST –Compressed Air: Air Master –Pumps: PSAT –Steam: SSAT –Motors: Motor Master  General training on D.O.E. software tools –1 to 3 day seminars on D.O.E. tools  Energy Saving Assessments –3-day assessment of specific energy system –Includes training on use of D.O.E. software tool

5 IAC Assessment  Gather and analyze data before visit  Team of faculty and students visit plant for one day  Work closely with clients to: –Reduce energy –Reduce waste –Improve productivity  Write custom, confidential, independent report with specific savings suggestions  Call back to see what was implemented

6 UD Industrial Assessment Center  Performed over 800 assessments since 1981  Check implementation results after one year –Half of recommendations implemented < 2 year –Average implemented savings: >$100,000 per year

7 UD-IAC Energy Assessment Approach  Develop Baseline –Billing analysis: how energy is priced –Energy balance: where energy is used –Lean energy analysis: why energy use changes  Identify and Quantify Savings Opportunities –Integrated Systems and Principals Approach to Identifying Savings Consider relevant energy systems (elect, lights, motors, fluid flow, compressed air, steam, process heating and cooling, HVAC) Apply principals of energy efficiency (inside out, control efficiency, counter flow, etc.) –Use engineering fundamentals and fundamental-based software to quantify savings  Measure and Benchmark –Measurement: extend LEA with sliding NAC and EI to measure energy efficiency improvement –Benchmarking: compare NAC and EI for inter-facility benchmarking

8 Baseline: Utility Bill Analysis  Analyze rate schedule  Verify billing amounts  Check for saving opportunities: –Primary/secondary –Power factor correction –Meter consolidation –Demand reduction potential  Benchmark costs

9 Baseline: Calibrated Energy Use Breakdowns

10 Baseline: Lean Energy Analysis  Model energy use as functions of weather and production –E = a + b T + c P –G = a + b T + c P  Use models for: –Measuring savings –Budgeting –LEA Breakdown –Benchmarking –Identifying Savings Opportunities

11 LEA: High Independent Identifies Operating Opportunities

12 LEA: High Scatter Identifies Control Opportunities Heating Energy Varies by 3X at Same Temp!

13 LEA: Departure From Expected Shape Identifies Malfunctioning Economizers  Air conditioning electricity use should flatten below 50 F  Audit found malfunctioning economizers

14 Energy Systems –Electrical –Lighting –Motor drive –Fluid flow –Compressed air –Steam and hot water –Process heating –Process cooling –Heating, ventilating and air conditioning –Cogeneration –Renewable Energy

15 Principles of Energy Efficiency Inside Out Analysis Understand Control Efficiency Think Counter-flow Avoid Mixing Match Source Energy to End Use Whole-system, Whole-time Frame Analysis

16 P-1: Think ‘Inside-out’ Result: Significant improvement at minimal cost

17 P-2: Understand Control Efficiency (Systems sized for peak but operate at part-load)

18 P-3: Think Counter Flow Q T T x x Q Parallel Flow Counter Flow

19 P-4: Avoid Mixing Availability analysis… Useful work destroyed with mixing Examples –CAV/VAV air handlers –Separate hot and cold wells –Material reuse/recycling

20 P-5: Match Source Energy to End Use

21 P-6: Whole System/Timeframe Design D opt = 200 mm when Tot Cost = NPV(Energy)+Pipe D opt = 250 mm when Cost= NPV(Energy)+Pipe+Pump Energy 250 = Energy 200 / 2

22 Integrated Systems + Principles Approach  Effective and Thorough

23 State of the Art Equipment  Power logging  Ultrasonic flow sensors  Ultrasonic vibration  Combustion analysis  Temperature, light, pressure, air flow, etc.

24 Lighting  End Use –Turn off blocked light –Occupancy sensors –Maximize day-lighting  Distribution –Add reflectors –Task Lighting –White ceilings / walls  Conversion –Upgrade fixtures

25 Motor Drive Systems  End Use –Turn off when not in use  Distribution –Smooth to notched V-Belts  Conversion –Replace rather than rewind –Right-size motors

26 Compressed Air Systems  End Use –Eliminate inappropriate uses –Air saver nozzles  Distribution –Fix leaks –Timed to demand control drains  Conversion –Reduce Pressure –Efficient control –Compress outdoor air –Properly stage –Adequate storage –Reclaim heat to space

27 Fluid Flow  End Use –Decrease head –Pump slower/longer  Distribution –Reduce friction  Conversion –Trim impellor / slow fan –VFDs for variable flow

28 Process Heating  End Use –Insulate hot surfaces –Block radiation –Minimize infiltration –Reduce cooling losses –Reduce conveyor losses –Reduce batch losses  Distribution –Counter flow heat exchange  Conversion –Reduce excess combustion air –Pre-heat combustion air or load –Cascade waste heat

29 Boiler / Steam Systems  End Use –Insulate hot surfaces –Cover open tanks  Distribution –Repair failed steam traps  Conversion –Reduce excess combustion air –Pre-heat combustion air or feed-water –Minimize steam pressure –Reduce blow-down –Modulation control –Add O 2 trim control

30 Process Cooling  End Use –Insulate cold surfaces –Increase HX effectiveness –Pinch analysis  Distribution –Avoid mixing  Conversion –Utilized most efficient cooling process –Properly stage chillers –VFDs on CT fans

31 Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning  End Use –Reduce set-points –Reduce infiltration/ventilation –Insulate un-insulated envelope  Distribution –Reduce temp stratification –Radiant heaters  Conversion –Reclaim heat from process –100% efficient MAU for ventilation –Differential pressure control for MAUs –Outdoor air economizers

32 Measurement and Benchmarking  Measurement –Extend LEA with sliding NAC and EI to measure energy efficiency improvement  Benchmarking –Compare NAC and EI for inter-facility benchmarking

33 Measure: Extend LEA by Calculating Sliding Normalized Annual Consumption (NAC) AC up by 10% NAC down by 12%

34 Benchmark: Compare NACs of Multiple Facilities  NAC NAC

35 Institutionalize Knowledge

36 Free Energy Analysis Software  ESim  HeatSim  CoolSim  AirSim  LightSim  ETracker

37 UD-IAC Alumni  McDonough-Braungart  Johnson Controls  Honeywell  Energy Resource Solutions  2RW Consulting  Select Energy Services  Heapy  Go Sustainable Energy  And many more…

38  U.S. DOE 2003 Center of Excellence  State of Ohio 2006 Governor’s Award for Excellence in Energy  U.S. DOE Energy Champion Awards to UD-IAC Clients Awards

39 Interested? Dr. Kelly Kissock Franc Sever


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