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Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative A Look at Inclusion and the Least Restrictive Environment Best Practices For Collaboration and Co-Teaching.

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Presentation on theme: "Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative A Look at Inclusion and the Least Restrictive Environment Best Practices For Collaboration and Co-Teaching."— Presentation transcript:

1 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative A Look at Inclusion and the Least Restrictive Environment Best Practices For Collaboration and Co-Teaching

2 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Why Inclusion??? It’s the law! & 1. “that to the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including children in public or private institutions and other care facilities, are educated with children who are non- disabled; and…

3 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Why??? Continued….. & 2. “that special classes, separate schooling or other removal of children with disabilities from the regular educational environment occurs only if the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily”

4 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative The Main Idea/Goal: To educate children with disabilities in an environment that is as close as possible to that in which they would be educated if they were not disabled. (unless the IEP requires another arrangement)

5 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Common Misunderstandings Determining Decisions About Students with Special Needs Myth  That inclusion is a policy that schools can choose to adopt or reject. Fact Inclusion is not a policy that schools can dismiss outright. Special Education is not a program or a place; it is a service delivery system for providing the learner with the supports and services needed to receive an education in the least restricted environment possible. “Inclusion is a right, not a special privilege for a select few” ( Oberti v. Board of Education of the Borough of Clementon School District 1993)

6 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Common Misunderstandings About LRE cont… Myth  That students with disabilities cannot receive an inclusive education because their skills aren’t close enough to those without disabilities. Fact Students with disabilities do not need to keep up with students without disabilities to be educated in inclusive classrooms; they do not need to engage in the curriculum the same way; and they do not need to practice the same skills that non-disabled students practice. Students with disabilities can work on individual skills and goals within the context of the general education curriculum.

7 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Common Misunderstandings About LRE cont… Myth  Schools can place students with specific labels or perceived levels of need such as children with autism, emotional disturbances and/or severe and profound disabilities in more segregated or self- contained settings without an opportunity to receive an education in a general setting with appropriate aids and services. Fact It is not enough for a district to simply claim that a segregated program is superior. Placement decisions must be determined. on an individual basis. Districts that automatically place students in a predetermined type of school or classroom setting solely on the basis of the disability or perceived level of functioning rather than on the basis of their educational needs clearly violate federal laws. (IDEA). (Roncker v. Walter, 1983)

8 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative How Do I Adapt Assignments and Activities To Meet Student Needs? Focus on ability not disability. It’s OK to modify assignments for certain children and not others. Keep assignments as similar to the rest of the class as possible. Be sensitive and respectful. Start slowly and develop gradually. It’s OK to make mistakes!!

9 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Accommodations and Modifications As we move closer to the intention behind the IDEA, adaptations and modifications in curriculum, classroom activities, and materials are a necessity. Teachers/providers can design and put into place the a range of “supplementary aids, services, and adaptations necessary for students to achieve educational success. (Federal Regulations § and § ) Any accommodations and modifications should be based on student educational need and on an individualized basis. Teachers/schools need not provide every support available, but must provide those required by the student with disabilities and the IEP. Bottom Line: Modifications help all students.

10 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative What Modifications are Used in Your Schools Presently? (Refer to Accommodations and Modifications Hand-out)

11 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Attitudinal Benefits of LRE and /or Inclusion Students without disabilities learn to be more responsive to others. New and valued relationships can develop. Students without disabilities learn something about their own lives and situations. Children learn about values and principles. Children gain an appreciation of diversity.

12 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Benefits and Barriers Of Inclusion (Refer to “Benefits and Barriers” Hand-out)

13 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative What Can You Do To Incorporate LRE Into Your Classroom? Vary your teaching strategies, styles, methods & materials. (Step outside your own comfort zone) Explore collaboration between general education and special education staffs. (Learn from one another) Utilize your own strengths as a leader. (Also, recognize and/or identify areas where you may need to challenge yourself and your skills) Allow for trial and error. (It’s OK to make mistakes) Teach/Guide by example. (Encourage tolerance and acceptance)

14 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative How Will Professional Roles Change?? Clarify with staff as to the LRE requirements and professional roles as they are now and how they need to be. (Refer to “Changes in Job Responsibilities” Hand-out)

15 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative LRE Role Redefinition The Special Educator Traditional Provides instruction to students eligible for services in resource rooms, special classes, and special schools. Redefined Collaborates with general educators and other support personnel to meet the needs of ALL learners. Team teaches with regular educators in general education classes. Recruits and trains students to be tutors and social supports for one another

16 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative LRE Role Redefinition The General Educator Traditional Refers students who do not “fit” into the traditional program for diagnosis, remediation, and possible removal. Teaches children who “fit” within the standard curriculum. Redefined Shares responsibility with special educators and other support personnel for teaching ALL children in the classroom. Seeks support of special educators and other support personnel for students experiencing difficulty in learning. Collaboratively plans and reaches with other members of the staff and community to meet the needs of all learners. Recruits and trains students to be tutors and supports for one another.

17 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative LRE Role Redefinition The Educational Assistant Traditional Works in segregated programs. If working in general education classrooms, stays in close proximity to and works only with student(s) eligible for special services Redefined Provides services to a variety of students in general education settings. Facilitates natural peer supports within the general education settings.

18 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative LRE Role Redefinition The Student Traditional Primarily works and competes with other students for “best” performance. Acts as a passive recipient of learning. Redefined Often works with other students in cooperative learning arrangements. Actively involved in instruction, advocacy, and decision-making for self and others.

19 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Characteristics of Successful Inclusive Programs (Refer to “Characteristics” Hand-out)

20 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Advantages of Co-Teaching (Refer to “Advantages” Hand-out)

21 Fall 2002Northeast Regional Education Cooperative Q & A


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