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Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 1 Working Fire Training 04-9 Training Materials FIRELINE Kearney St. Fire (Extended Segment) Discussion.

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Presentation on theme: "Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 1 Working Fire Training 04-9 Training Materials FIRELINE Kearney St. Fire (Extended Segment) Discussion."— Presentation transcript:

1 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 1 Working Fire Training 04-9 Training Materials FIRELINE Kearney St. Fire (Extended Segment) Discussion HANDS-ON Fireground Operations, Pt. II Quiz Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II Quiz FIRE MEDICS Geriatric Heart Attack Incident Quiz EVOLUTIONS 2000 Kramer vs. Kramer Answers to Quizzes TRAINING Click here to view show in its entirety Click here to view show in its entirety

2 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 2 SIZE-UP Fire on third floor of residential structure Firefighters arrived to third floor involved. Difficult apparatus access Many flights of stairs Fireline Incident: Kearney Street Fire (expanded segment) 04-9 Training Materials

3 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 3 Fireline Incident: Kearney Street Fire (expanded segment) 04-9 Training Materials STRATEGY/TACTICS: Deployed multiple hose lines Hoses had to be hauled up multiple stairways. Exposure protection on Side B

4 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 4 EVENTS: Long hose lays up stairs resulted in kinked lines That led to reduced water pressure. Resulted in having to cut off hose lines to share water pressure Fireline Incident: Kearney Street Fire (expanded segment) 04-9 Training Materials

5 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 5 LESSONS LEARNED IC was glad the fire was not on a lower floor; would have resulted in a longer incident with diminishing resources (water/water pressure) Avoid kinked hose lines whenever possible. Some incidents present obstacle that just can’t easily be overcome, regardless of preplanning. Fireline Incident: Kearney Street Fire (expanded segment) 04-9 Training Materials

6 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 6 Department Discussion The departments involved in this month’s training pose some discussion questions that you can use as discussion-starters in your own department’s training sessions. How will your department handle these scenarios? 04-9 Training Materials

7 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 7 Kearney Street Fire, San Francisco, CA Asst. Chief Aaron C. Stevenson, San Francisco F.D. Do you have areas of your jurisdiction where you know you’ll have apparatus access problems because of narrow streets or restrictions of some kind? What is your alternative plan in those areas, especially if you can’t use aerials? Continuing that thought, narrow streets may mean close exposures. If you prepare for one, you had better prepare for the others. 04-9 Training Materials Fireline Incident Discussion

8 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 8 Kearney Street Fire, San Francisco, CA Asst. Chief Aaron C. Stevenson, San Francisco F.D. Do you have ways of boosting water pressure in low- pressure areas? –Are your pumper engineers trained to maximize pump pressure in such areas? –Be sure your hose lines aren’t kinked. If you’re using multiple lines, you might have to share the water, shutting down different lines at different times. If you can find a source and have the apparatus, how about tanker shuttling? 04-9 Training Materials Fireline Incident Discussion

9 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 9 Kearney Street Fire, San Francisco, CA Asst. Chief Aaron C. Stevenson, San Francisco F.D. If the fire had been on a lower floor, we probably would have had more alarms, more exposure problems and a much longer incident. Always wear your SCBA in smoke. 04-9 Training Materials Fireline Incident Discussion

10 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 10 LIVE SCENARIOS PREPARATION Search Team –Search team readiness –Appropriate PPE and SCBA, –Rescue search tools (halligan, axe) Fire Suppression –Fire attack team readiness –Appropriate PPE and SCBA, –Charged hose line 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Fireground Operations, Pt. II

11 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 11 LIVE SCENARIOS PREPARATION Command & Support –Incident Commander role –Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) standing by SEARCH & RESCUE, TWO-STORY RESIDENCE Scenario begins: Size-up –First-in crews arrive; size-up is conducted. –We have a two-story structure with fire and at least one occupant in an upper rear bedroom –Incident Commander establishes sectors –Accountability report is taken toward the end of the scenario. 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Fireground Operations, Pt. II

12 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 12 SEARCH & RESCUE, TWO-STORY RESIDENCE Search & Rescue –With the possibility of occupants to be rescued, I.C. strikes second alarm which should also add EMS. –Search team entering through front removes one occupant. –Second search team heads for rear of structure. –Simulated bars on rear door (simulated) must be cut before rescue can be effected. Bars on doors are simulated by a station drill at the rear of the building where burglar bars and lock shackles must be cut before entry can be made to the structure. In this case, a circular saw (K-12 style) was used for cutting. 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Fireground Operations, Pt. II

13 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 13 SEARCH & RESCUE, TWO-STORY RESIDENCE Search & Rescue –Occupant is brought down ladder. –An extension ladder is then thrown to rear upper window. Fire Suppression –Fire suppression team enters through front of structure. –Team heads for second floor. –Hose work achieves sufficient ventilation out back window –PPV fan is brought to front of structure but not used until later in the scenario because of #3. 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Fireground Operations, Pt. II

14 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 14 04-9 Training Materials SEARCH & RESCUE, TWO-STORY RESIDENCE Incident Command –Calls for second alarm upon hearing that an occupant may be in the house. Calls additional alarms as scenario progresses. –Accountability check is made toward end of scenario. Scenario Outcome –Search team exits; two patients are retrieved; –Suppression team exits; fire is knocked down, structure is ventilated. –RIT is not a factor. Hands-On: Fireground Operations, Pt. II

15 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 15 04-9 Training Materials SEARCH & RESCUE, TWO-STORY RESIDENCE Post-Analysis –Some delay in rear rescue while window bars were cut. –Ventilation is very helpful in creating a safe environment for firefighters. Some believe it should happen early on; others believe it can exacerbate a fire if the conditions aren’t right. –Robin Echle discusses the value of night training. Hands-On: Fireground Operations, Pt. II

16 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 16 Fireground Operations, Part II: Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 1. Yes or No: Is it possible to ventilate without using a fan? 2. Yes or No: Do search teams always have attack teams accompany them? 3. Yes or No: Should we always call a second alarm when we find we may have occupants in the structure?

17 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 17 Fireground Operations, Part II: Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 4. Consider the tools listed below. Assuming 1 being the best and being the worst, assign the letters of the tools in the best order for cutting window bars, balancing speed and effectiveness: a. Slice Pack (exothermic torch) 1 = _?_ b. ax/sledge hammer 2 = _?_ c. Sawsall 3 = _?_ d. Hydraulic “Jaws” 4 = _?_ e. K-12 (circular) saw 5 = _?_

18 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 18 Fireground Operations, Part II: Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 5. Multiple Choice: Which should the R.I.T be doing during this scenario? a. Laying out equipment b. Planning exit routes and maybe even throwing ladders c. Shuttling tools inside to truck crews d. Sizing up e. All but one of the above (Answers on Slide 42)

19 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 19 04-9 Training Materials PREPARATION: Tools –Full PPE including air pack –Chain saw or rotary saw –A rope bag –Forcible Entry tools: “The Irons” Halligan bar Flat-head axe Halligan Hook, also known as the New York Roof Hook VENTILATION : When you cut your ventilation hole, only cut one! Hands-On: Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II

20 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 20 VENTILATION: Ventilation Holes –The initial hole should be approximately 4’ X 4’. Mark out the dimensions on the roof with spray paint. Extend the legs of the cuts and subdivide them. This will allow you to more easily cut a larger hole as two of the cuts are already made 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II Initial Hole Knockout Triangle Cut a triangular “knockout” section at a corner. Knock out or push through the triangle and insert your Halligan hook to pull up the boards. Use it as a pry bar.

21 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 21 VENTILATION: Ventilation Holes –Some roofs have a lot of roofing paper and material that makes removal difficult. Try using your ax to get through the first layer, then use your K-12 or circular saw. HINT: Instead of using the blade of the ax, turn it over and use the blunt ax head. –Push the ceiling down with the opposite (non-hook) end of the Halligan. Using the hook end will probably get it hung up on lath, plaster, or other ceiling materials. 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II

22 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 22 VENTILATION: Trench Cut –This is a defensive tactic where you give up a portion of the roof to save the remainder. Though a defensive operation, offensive operations may be taking place at the same time. Firefighters may be below pulling ceilings and directing hose streams into the attic space. –YOU USUALLY DON’T WANT TO MIX OFFENSIVE & DEFENSIVE TACTICS! FIREFIGHTERS CAN GET HURT OR KILLED. However, there are exceptions. –This is a very labor-intensive operation; you won’t see a trench cut with just a couple of companies on a first alarm, but with more companies on additional alarms. 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II

23 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 23 VENTILATION: Trench Cut –The Trench Cut is actually a series of cuts The first and most important step is cutting the primary heat hole, approximately 8’ X 8’. –Cut Inspection Holes, about the width of a saw blade, about 15 feet from the heat hole. Usually, these are three plunge cuts forming a triangle. –Then cut the trench, from wall to wall, about three feet wide. All that roofing material (fire fuel) will have to be removed if you decide to pull the boards below. 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II

24 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 24 VENTILATION: Trench Cut 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II TRENCH CUT PRIMARY HEAT HOLE INSPECTION HOLES

25 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 25 VENTILATION : Trench Cut –How do you know? If our inspection holes revealed the fire is moving toward the trench and has passed the primary heat hole, then pull the boards down. Make the trench cuts in manageable sections so if you have to pull the boards, it will be real easy. –Cut two inspection holes past the trench cut to make sure the fire stopped at the first trench cut. –If you have to cut more trenches, try to use the design of the roof to provide boundaries, which means fewer cuts. Again, do the cuts, but don’t pull roofing material or boards until you have to. This cut should halt the progress of the fire. 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II

26 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 26 VENTILATION: Horizontal Ventilation –Take a Halligan bar and a piece of webbing or rope and secure them just below the fork or claw end of the Halligan. –Lower the Halligan to the height level of the window you want to break to supply ventilation. –Pull the Halligan back up and then throw it out, letting it swing back down, breaking the window. 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II

27 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 27 VICTIM RESCUE Rescuing from an upper story window or a light well: Two options: –Use your rope that you brought up with you to pull up a roof ladder -OR- –Have the aerial driver bring up a ladder to you. –Lower the roof ladder down to the victim. –Another more complicated tactic would be to rig a rope rescue; see Volume 04-5 for details on how that is done. 04-9 Training Materials Hands-On: Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II

28 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 28 Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II: Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 1. True or False: Here’s all you have to do to ventilate horizontally: throw a Halligan bar over the side of the building. 2. True or False: You could haul a roof ladder up to the roof with the rope you bring with you. 3. True or False: Take a look at the design of a roof before you decide where to make a trench cut.

29 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 29 Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II: Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 4. Multiple Choice: Which of the following would you NOT do when making a ventilation hole? a. Lay out the roof cuts on the roof with spray paint. b. Cut through the roofing material using an ax and a Sawsall. c. Cut a triangular “knock-out” section at a corner. d. Push the ceiling down with the blunt end of a Halligan hook. e. None of the above of the above

30 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 30 Flat Roof Operations, Pt. II: Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 5. Multiple Choice: Which of the following regarding trench cuts is incorrect? a. Cut an 8’ X 8’ primary heat hole. b. Cut inspection holes with three plunge cuts. c. Cut two holes past the trench to see if the trench worked. d. Making a trench cut is an offensive tactic. e. None of the above (Answers on Slide 42)

31 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 31 SIZE-UP An elderly man is found on the street, seemingly to be in cardiac distress. –Arrive on scene via 911 dispatch. –Check as thoroughly as possible for additional medical emergencies since paramedics had no identity of the man and no medical history. –Check to see if anyone nearby saw him fall or noticed any other symptoms such as staggering or dizzy behavior. Fire Medics Incident: Geriatric Heat Attack Incident 04-9 Training Materials

32 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 32 STRATEGY/TACTICS: Check ABCs –Vital signs indicate defibrillation necessary. –Establish an airway, in this case, via intubation. –Establish a stable heartbeat. Stabilize patient before transport –Immobilize patient on a backboard for two reasons: The patient may have sustained unknown injuries in the fall A backboard provides a stable platform and makes transport much easier. Fire Medics Incident: Geriatric Heat Attack Incident 04-9 Training Materials

33 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 33 STRATEGY/TACTICS: Transport to hospital –Once stabilized, the patient was transported by ambulance. –In view of the proximity of the incident to the hospital and the stabilized condition of the patient, no alternative transport was necessary. Fire Medics Incident: Geriatric Heat Attack Incident 04-9 Training Materials

34 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 34 FACTORS AFFECTING DECISION-MAKING: A Command Management system was in place. –Important to manage the three agencies involved. Manual Defibrillation vs. AED –Either could be used; choice is based on equipment available. Fire Medics Incident: Geriatric Heat Attack Incident 04-9 Training Materials

35 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 35 04-9 Training Materials FACTORS AFFECTING DECISION-MAKING: Golden Hour concerns vs. stabilization –Paramedics must balance the need to move the patient within the Golden Hour (“swoop and scoop”) with the importance of stabilizing the patient on scene in order to effect a successful transport. –Especially important when balancing cardiac urgency vs. other medical treatment that might be needed on scene. Fire Medics Incident: Geriatric Heat Attack Incident

36 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 36 LESSONS LEARNED Coordination among agencies –Police, fire, and EMS were involved. –Unified Command should be used. Inter-agency training –Each agency has its own unique concerns and things which are important to it. –Need to do more joint training among these agencies; as much as possible. Fire Medics Incident: Geriatric Heat Attack Incident 04-9 Training Materials

37 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 37 Geriatric Heart Attack Incident : Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 1. True or False: Just treat the obvious problem; worry about other possible concerns later. 2. True or False: Survey the neighborhood or surrounding area in the case of a John Doe. 3. True or False: AEDs are lousy because they are for amateurs..

38 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 38 Geriatric Heart Attack Incident : Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 4. Multiple Choice: Which of the following does not belong? a. Stabilizing patient b. Using a backboard c. Snatch and grab d. Using intubation e. All of the above

39 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 39 Geriatric Heart Attack Incident : Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 5. Multiple Choice: Which is a true statement? a. Inter-agency training is extremely desirable b. EMS concerns are different enough that they can’t train with Police. c. Police won’t want to be bossed around by a fire Incident Commander. d. Mutual aid and inter-agency response is overrated. e. All of the above. (Answers on Slide 42)

40 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 40 Continuing Education Kramer vs. Kramer: Leadership: Promotion vs. Hiring Talent Complete written responses to the following three essay questions: 1. What are the advantages of having Fire Service leadership promoted from within the ranks? 2. What are the advantages of having Fire Service leadership selected from outside the organization? 3. Has your direct supervisor been promoted from within or selected from the outside? Why are you happy with this or why would you prefer a change? …CONT. If you’re enrolled in the Open Learning Fire Service Program at the University of Cincinnati, here’s your opportunity this month to earn one college credit hour for watching Working Fire Training.

41 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 41 Continuing Education ENROLLMENT INFORMATION: For more information on enrolling in the Open Learning program to gain college credit, call Working Fire at 800-516-3473 for a brochure or, to register directly, call the University of Cincinnati at 513-556-6583. Associates and Bachelors programs are available. Call to have your transcripts evaluated. Send your responses to: Professor Bill Kramer University of Cincinnati College of Applied Science 2220 Victory Parkway, ML #103 Cincinnati, Ohio 45206

42 Working Fire Training / Copyright 2005 / Volume 04-9 42 04-9 Training Materials Thanks so much for viewing Working Fire Training! See you next month – stay safe! Answers to Hands-On Quiz on Slides 16-18: 1. Yes 2. No 3. Yes 4. e, a, d, c, b (Without question, this can be argued, but here’s one line of reasoning. The torch and K-12 are about equal, but not everyone has the torch. The jaws are good but slower and need the whole hydraulic rig. The Sawsall is slower yet, but takes less effort than the ax /sledge which are really slow and take a lot of effort. But feel free to differ! Whatever your favorite, have a backup ready! 5. e. Answers to Hands-On Quiz on Slides 28-30: 1. False 2. True 3. True 4. b. 5. d. Answers to Fire Medics Quiz on Slides 37-39: 1. False 2. True 3. False 4. c. 5. a. TRAINING


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