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The Art – Way of Communication This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication (communication) reflects the views.

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Presentation on theme: "The Art – Way of Communication This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication (communication) reflects the views."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Art – Way of Communication This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication (communication) reflects the views only of the author and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of information contained therein.

2 The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS Constantin Brâncuşi sculptor

3 Constantin Brâncuşi (February 19, 1876 – March 16, 1957), Romanian-born sculptor who made his career in France. As a child he displayed an aptitude for carving wooden farm tools. Formal studies took him first to Bucharest, then to Munich, then to the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. His abstract style emphasizes clean geometrical lines that balance forms inherent in his materials with the symbolic allusions of representational art. Considered the pioneer of modernism Brâncuşi is called the Patriarch of Modern Sculpture. The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS

4 LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS Brâncuşi grew up in the village of Hobiţa Romania, Gorj, near Târgu Jiu, close to Romania's Carpathian Mountains, an area known for its rich tradition of folk crafts, particularly woodcarving. Geometric patterns of the region are seen in his later works. His parents Nicolae and Maria Brâncuşi were poor peasants who earned a meager living through back-breaking labor; from the age of seven, Constantin herded the family's flock of sheep. He showed talent for carving objects out of wood, and often ran away from home to escape the bullying of his father and older brothers.

5 At the age of nine, Brâncuşi left the village to work in the nearest large town. At 11 he went into the service of a grocer in Slatina; and then he became a domestic in a public house in Craiova where he remained for several years. When he was 18, impressed by Brâncuşi's talent for carving, an industrialist entered him in the Craiova School of Arts and Crafts, where he pursued his love for woodworking, graduating with honors in The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS

6 In 1903 Brâncuşi traveled to Munich, and from there to Paris. In Paris, he was welcomed by the community of artists and intellectuals brimming with new ideas. He worked for two years in the workshop of Antonin Mercié of the École des Beaux-Arts, and was invited to enter the workshop of Auguste Rodin. Even though he admired the eminent Rodin he left the Rodin studio after only two months, saying, "Nothing can grow under big trees." The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS

7 After leaving Rodin's workshop, Brâncuşi began developing the revolutionary style for which he is known. His first commissioned work, "The Prayer", was part of a gravestone memorial. It depicts a young woman crossing herself as she kneels, and marks the first step toward abstracted, non-literal representation, and shows his drive to depict "not the outer form but the idea, the essence of things." He also began doing more carving, rather than the method popular with his contemporaries, that of modeling in clay or plaster which would be cast in metal, and by 1908 he worked almost exclusively by carving. The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS

8 His works became popular in France, Romania and the United States. Collectors, notably John Quinn, bought his pieces, and reviewers praised his works. In 1913 Brâncuşi's work was displayed at both the Salon des Indépendants and the first exhibition in the U.S. of modern art, the Armory Show. The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS

9 LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS Selected works Famous Brâncuşi works include The Sleeping Muse (1908), The Kiss (1908), Prometheus (1911), Mademoiselle Pogany (1913), The Newborn (1915), Bird in Space (1919) and The Column of the Infinite, popularly known as The Endless Column (1938). Both Bird in Space and Sleeping Muse I are sculptures of animate objects; however, unlike ones from Ancient Greece or Rome, or those from the High Renaissance period, these works of art are more abstract in style.

10 Bird in Space is a series from the 1920s. One of these, constructed in 1925 using wood, stone, and marble (Richler 178) stands around 72 inches tall and consists of a narrow feather standing erect on a wooden base. Similar models, but made from materials such as bronze, were also produced by Brâncuşi and placed in exhibitions. Sleeping Muse I has different versions as well; one, from 1909–10, is made of marble and measures 6 ¾ in. in height (Adams 549). This is a model of a head, without a body, with markings to show features such as hair, nose, lips, and closed eyes. The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS

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20 The Chairs Alley comes next, representing those who participate without any implication, waiting for the end. The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS

21 The Gate of the Kiss(Poarta Sărutului) Is the second element of the ensemble. Technically speaking, it is 5,13 m high, 5,45 m long and the pillars have 1,69 m width. This time, the material used was Banpotoc travertine and in order to achieve the Gate, Brancusi was helped by two stone carvers: Ion Alexandrescu from Bucharest and Golea from Dobrita. It’s significance is very simple: the Kiss Gate makes the transition to another life, and the motif on the pillars stands for the eyes looking inside. The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS

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23 The Endless Column (Coloana fără Sfârşit) Or the Column of Gratitude, m high, is the third element of the ensemble, being situated at the eastern extremity of the axis forming the Alley of Heroes. The column is made out of 17 rhomboidal cast iron modules, measuring 1,80 m high each and about 860 kg, moulded in the Central Workshop from Petrosani. The modules are fixed on a steel axis. The one who ethnically coordinated the assembling of the column was the engineer Stefan Georgescu-Gorjan. Otherwise, the Endless Column is considered to be the “spiritual will” of Constantin Brancusi. The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS

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26 The whole ensemble from Targu-Jiu was inaugurated on October 27th, After 1989, the monumental Ensemble from Targu Jiu was enlisted in the European heritage. The Art – Way of Communication LLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUSLLPLLPCOMENIUSCOMENIUS


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