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Bartlesville Public School District “Future Schools Discussion Month” Madison Middle School February 12, 2013 Central Middle School February 5, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Bartlesville Public School District “Future Schools Discussion Month” Madison Middle School February 12, 2013 Central Middle School February 5, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bartlesville Public School District “Future Schools Discussion Month” Madison Middle School February 12, 2013 Central Middle School February 5, 2013

2 LRFPC Representatives  Scott Ambler, Construction/Capital Expense Committee  David Austin, Communication Committee  Scott Bilger, Survey Committee  Tracye Caughell, Academic Performance Committee  Chuck McCauley, Annual Operating Expenses Committee  Granger Meador, Construction/Capital Expense Committee

3 Why do we need a bond issue?

4 Decreasing state funding Increasing student poverty Aging middle school facilities Secure entrances for older facilities BPSD Challenges

5 BPSD Challenges: Decreasing State Funding State Aid funding formula for the Bartlesville Public School District

6 BPSD Challenges: Decreasing State Funding State Aid Formula Funding for the Bartlesville Public School District

7 BPSD Challenges: Increasing Student Poverty Percentage of students qualifying for federal poverty aid has almost doubled since 1991 to approx. 50%

8 We are currently living with the consequences of planning decisions made decades ago. The decisions made now will set us up for decades to come.

9 Central Middle School Built in 1917 with additions in 1926 and 1956 Some cosmetic renovations and HVAC upgrades in 1994

10 Central Middle School Attractive exterior Downtown location with adjoining park Has “good bones” but all of the problems of a building approaching the century mark with outmoded deteriorating interior spaces Building envelope (roof, walls) leaking

11 Central Middle School Inadequate cafeteria size requires five lunch periods, disrupting teaching time Present entrance does not allow for adequate security Several areas of concern in building’s lower level which includes gymnasiums and locker rooms Fine Arts space inadequate

12 Central’s Auxiliary Gym

13 Central’s Plaster Crumbling

14 Central’s Crumbling Plaster

15 Central’s Classroom Floors

16 Madison Middle School Built in 1958 with additions in 1960, 1963, 1993

17 Madison Middle School Entire facility has deteriorated enough to require either major renovations or complete replacement Gymnasium has ongoing groundwater damage Cafeteria/Auditorium has problematic and uneven floor levels

18 Madison’s Deteriorating Walls

19 Madison’s Gym Floor (groundwater damage)

20 Madison’s Decaying Exterior

21 Madison’s Exterior ‘Windows’

22 Mid-High Built in 1967 with additions in 1980, 1999, 2009

23 Mid-High School Built as Sooner High School with robust physical plant Cafeteria undersized Unsecured main entrance

24 Bartlesville High School Built in 1939 with additions in 1954, 1958, 1963, 1968,

25 Bartlesville High School Transportation and safety issues with athletics and academics between Mid-High and BHS Cafeteria is inadequate, with low ceiling and no windows and is only able to serve 150 students Alternative High School classes are found on two levels and not isolated from rest of student body

26 Long Range Facilities Planning Committee following Feb Bond Issue March - Committee expanded and diversified to 60 members Members: Ken Allen, Scott Ambler, David Austin, Michelle Baker, Stan Baughn, Lisa Beeman, Bill Beirerschmitt, Roger Box, Jody Burch, Tracye Caughell, Kelly Diven, Dan Droege, Thad Friedman, Ed Gordon, Carolyn Gorman, Ginger Griffin, John Harris, John Henthorne, Randy John, Sara Jones, Jess Kane, David Kedy, Ron Kennedy, Dan Keleher, Jr., Beth Klauwn, Barry Lowe, Marta Manning, Ryan O’Neil, Dorea Potter, Kevin Potter, Earl Sears, Rick Smith, Heather Snow, Kay Sowers, Scott Townsend, Ron Tribble, Michael Vallandingham, John Williams and John Wolf March & April - Independent Focus group studies and Voter surveys completed May – Oct - Research performed on comparable and peer school districts Nov – Jan - Faculty, staff and student surveys conducted

27 Research Results: Messages from the Voters Focus on improvement to existing facilities Students should remain at Central Should continue with two middle schools Total cost should be reasonable Strong support for high school expansion beyond Two rounds of Staff & Student surveys

28 Bond Proposal Goals and Priorities Provide strong academic setting for students Save annual operating expenses Plan has voter acceptance to allow passage in a bond issue Provides flexibility for students and teachers Can be reached at a reasonable capital expense Provides facilities adequately secured for student safety

29 9-12 Configuration Research Research and study of peer institutions indicates that fewer transitions benefit academics Both advanced students and struggling learners can benefit Separate Freshman Academy can ease transition to high school

30 Present Configuration: Transitions Bartlesville High School 11-12Mid-High 9-10Central 6-8 WaysideKane Jane Phillips Madison 6-8 Ranch Heights HooverWilson Transition

31 6-12 Configurations Considered high school 9-10 mid-high Two 6-8 middle schools high school 8-9 mid-high 6-7 grade center 9-12 high school Two 6-8 middle schools

32 Research Results: Faculty and Students 88% of secondary staff support expanding Bartlesville High School to 9-12 with expanded facilities and a Freshman Academy Maintaining present configuration of at high school is least preferred option Cost savings should go toward instruction, such as preserving class sizes

33 Two plans emerging thus far… Reconfiguration Expand BHS to 9-12 Move Madison to Mid-High Renovate Central $28-34 million Over $250,000 in annual operating savings from closing 1 of 4 secondary sites Renovate what we have No grade shifts Renovate Madison Renovate Central $24-30 million No annual operating savings

34 Current Options for Consideration Renovate what we have and maintain current configuration High School – cafeteria/renovate old spaces $ 4.4 million Mid-High – cafeteria, security, bus loop, science $ 2.9 million Central – Upgrade cafeteria, fine arts, gym, secure entry $ 6 million Option: Also renovate remaining classrooms $ 6 million Madison – full renovations, new gym $ 10.2 million TOTAL Capital Cost $ million Operational Savings $ 0

35 Current Options for Consideration Reconfigure to a 9-12 High School High School – add cafeteria and space for 9 th & 10 th (9 th in Freshman Academy) $ 21.2 million Mid-High – secured entrance, science $ 0.4 million Central – Upgrade cafeteria, fine arts, gym, secure entry $ 6 million Option: Also renovate remaining classrooms $ 6 million Madison – demolition $ 0.3 million Total Capital Cost $28 – 34 million Operational Savings > $250,000/year

36 Commonly asked questions Overcrowding – If 10th grade is added to the high school, an additional wing would be added. The cafeteria would be expanded as well. Separate Freshman Academy – If 9 th grade were moved to the High School campus, freshmen would be housed in a separate Freshman Academy. Freshmen would still go to the main building and for extracurricular classes and to the NEW cafeteria, but contact with upperclassmen would be minimized through scheduling. Class Sizes – No part of the operational savings discussed here involve increased class sizes. Individual class sizes vary, but all estimates assume that average class sizes will remain the same. Operational Savings – It is our expectation that savings in operating expenses would be returned to the general fund, freeing up money for smaller class sizes, more competitive salaries, academic materials, etc.

37 Reconfiguration Plan Additions for grades 9 & 10 Freshman Academy

38 Central renovation options the same in both plans Partial OR Full renovations of main building Fully renovate north building

39 Central renovation options the same in both plans Ground Floor (Delaware Street Level) Accessible Gym Secure Office Vocal Music Orchestra Classrooms

40 Central renovation options the same in both plans First Floor (Cherokee Street Level) Option: Renovate the rest of this level Old offices become classrooms

41 Central renovation options the same in both plans Second Floor Option: Renovate this level

42 Central renovation options the same in both plans Third Floor Option: Renovate the rest of this level Band Room

43 Takeaways NO increase in the millage Grade 6-12 improvements are crucial to continued excellence Must reflect voter feedback: we need your input! Ongoing updates at

44 Question and Answer Members of the Long Range Facilities Planning Committee will now take questions and comments

45 Question for you: If reconfiguring to a 9-12 high school would offer academic benefits and would generate annual savings, would it be worth the additional expense?

46 Another question for you: Regardless of 9-12 configuration, would you be willing to spend an additional $5-6 million in order to completely renovate Central and address all of its building needs?


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