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FOOD INTOLERANCE TESTING

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1 FOOD INTOLERANCE TESTING

2 TOPICS Terminology Mechanisms of food intolerance
Symptoms of food intolerance CNS food intolerance tests Test principles Alternative test methods Managing food intolerances Support documentation

3 “What is food to one man, may be fierce poison to another”
Lucretius circa 75BC The earliest reference to Food Allergy was recorded by Lucretius in 75BC

4 TERMINOLOGY

5 ADVERSE REACTION TO FOOD
IMMUNE MEDIATED NON–IMMUNE MEDIATED IgE Type I Allergy IgG Type III Allergy Enzyme Deficiency Pharmacological Effect Chemical Effect Classic ‘Allergic’ Reaction ‘Food Intolerance’ Food Intolerance COMMON TERMINOLOGY

6 1. IMMUNE-MEDIATED REACTIONS
FOOD ALLERGY (Type I) ? FOOD INTOLERANCE (Type III) ?

7 FOOD ALLERGY Immune system response Production of IgE antibodies

8 FOOD ALLERGY ‘Foreign’ food particles (antigens) cause immediate immune reaction Rapid release of histamine Allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) can cause breathing problems and low blood pressure Symptoms include tingling mouth, hives, swelling of the lips, face, tongue and throat Symptoms can be severe or life-threatening Avoid the offending food for life

9 FOOD INTOLERANCE (IgG)
Immune system response Production of IgG antibodies

10 FOOD INTOLERANCE (IgG)
“45% of the population suffer from a food intolerance” Non-specific / multiple symptoms Most people are undiagnosed Many clients will be affected

11 FOOD INTOLERANCE (IgG)
Delayed reaction to ‘foreign’ food (antigen) - hours/days after consumption Body produces IgG antibodies to neutralise antigen Form a complex with antigen: Ag/Ab complex Immune complex

12 FOOD INTOLERANCE (IgG)
Complexes deposited in tissues around the body Triggers complement cascade Release of inflammatory mediators

13 FOOD INTOLERANCE (IgG)
Leads to chronic inflammation and gradual appearance of symptoms Symptoms can persist for many days, but are not life-threatening Symptoms can be reversed by elimination of foods Re-introduce small amounts of the offending food Common to be intolerant to several different foods Multiple symptoms are common – difficult to diagnose FI

14 2. NON IMMUNE-MEDIATED REACTIONS
ENZYME DEFICIENCY CHEMICAL & PHARMACOLOGICAL FOOD INTOLERANCE

15 ENZYME DEFICIENCY / INSUFFICIENCY
Enzyme deficiencies can cause symptoms because foods cannot be digested LACTOSE INTOLERANCE Caused by a deficiency of lactase (needed to digest lactose) Cannot pass through gut wall, so remains in the gut Causes intolerance Symptoms: bloating, diarrhoea, abdominal pain

16 ENZYME DEFICIENCY / INSUFFICIENCY
HISTAMINE INTOLERANCE Caused by a deficiency or inhibition of diamine oxidase (DAO) Needed to break down histamine in foods Aggravated by foods high in histamine: red wine, cheese and tuna fish Foods low in histamine can also trigger the release of histamine in the body: citrus foods, bananas, tomatoes, chocolate Symptoms include: migraines, dizziness, bowel/stomach problems, rhinitis, depression, irritation, reddening of the skin

17 CHEMICAL / PHARMACOLOGICAL
MSG in restaurant / take-away food (headaches, sweating, dizziness) Sulphites in dried fruits and vegetables, wine, beer (asthma) Vasoactive amines such as phenylethylamine in chocolate, citrus fruits (migraines) Natural / artificial additives used to colour, preserve and flavour food (sweating, itching, abdominal pain, nausea/vomiting, diarrhoea) Create biochemical side effects in susceptible individuals

18 MECHANISMS OF FOOD INTOLERANCE

19 MECHANISMS OF FOOD INTOLERANCE (1)
HEALTHY gastrointestinal tract and HEALTHY immune system: Foods digested and broken down to glucose, amino acids and fatty acids Absorbed through the gut lining Partially digested foods will also pass between cells into bloodstream Antibodies produced against these partially digested foods Form antigen / antibody complexes (normal) Efficient immune system will clear these complexes No symptoms despite an immune response occurring

20 Complexes removed by macrophages
NORMAL RESPONSE TO FOOD Food Healthy Immune System Healthy Gut Low level of Ab/Ag complexes Complexes removed by macrophages No symptoms

21 MECHANISMS OF FOOD INTOLERANCE (2)
HEALTHY gastrointestinal tract, but COMPROMISED immune system: Partially digested foods pass through the gut lining Antibodies produced against these partially digested foods Ab/Ag complexes form (normal) Compromised immune system - insufficient macrophages produced Ab/Ag complexes not cleared and circulate in bloodstream Deposited in tissues – causes inflammation

22 COMPROMISED IMMUNE SYSTEM
Food Compromised Immune System Healthy Gut Low level of Ag/Ab complexes excess complexes deposited in tissues Symptoms

23 MECHANISMS OF FOOD INTOLERANCE (3)
LEAKY gastrointestinal tract, but HEALTHY immune system: Gut wall becomes more permeable Tight junctions in epithelial layer open up Increased number of partially digested foods enter bloodstream Ag/Ab complexes form – immune system becomes overloaded Complexes cannot be cleared and are deposited in tissues

24 excess complexes deposited in tissues
LEAKY GUT Food Normal Immune System Leaky Gut High level of Ag/Ab complexes excess complexes deposited in tissues Symptoms

25 FACTORS LINKED TO LEAKY GUT Heal gut with supplements and diet
Antibiotics Medication/Drugs Candida overgrowth Parasites Intestinal bacterial/viral infection Glutamine insufficiency Alcohol Poor diet Stress Low stomach acid Low pancreatic enzymes Heal gut with supplements and diet

26 SYMPTOMS OF FOOD INTOLERANCE

27 SYMPTOMS OF FOOD INTOLERANCE
Respiratory: Asthma, rhinitis, sinusitis, persistent cough, catarrh Gastrointestinal: IBS, Crohn's disease, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, constipation, bloating, flatulence Skin: Eczema, rashes, spots CNS: Headache, migraine, hyperactivity (ADHD) Cardiovascular: Heart palpitations Musculoskeletal: Joint pain, rheumatoid arthritis, muscle pain, fibromyalgia Psychiatric: Chronic fatigue, insomnia, ME, anxiety, depression Metabolic: Weight gain

28 SYMPTOMS OF FOOD INTOLERANCE
Many symptoms – difficult to identify the cause (e.g. fatigue) IgG testing can be useful – diagnose / eliminate

29 CNS FOOD INTOLERANCE TESTS

30 CNS FOOD INTOLERANCE TESTS
Food Detective™ FoodPrint ® Food Microplate ELISA

31 World’s first rapid test kit for detecting food IgG antibodies

32 FEATURES Detects antibodies to 59 common foods
Rapid assay format – results in 40 minutes Positive and negative controls included Clear and concise instructions Colour coded reagents Finger-prick blood sample

33 BENEFITS Only home-test kit on the market
No specialised equipment needed No waiting for laboratory results Act on results immediately Website supported:

34 CONTENTS Sterile wipe Safety lancet x 2 Plaster x 2
Blood collection tube Sample diluent (A) Antibody detector (B) Developer (C) Wash solution (D) Reaction tray IFU Result card Dietary support guide

35 EASY TO FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS
Food Detective instructional video

36 TEST PROCEDURE Sterilise finger with wipe Prick finger with lancet
Massage finger to obtain blood Fill the capillary tube (50μl)

37 TEST PROCEDURE Leave for 20 minutes Place in SOLUTION A
(Sample Diluent) Pour into tray Leave for 20 minutes

38 TEST PROCEDURE Leave for 10 minutes SOLUTION D (Wash Solution)
Repeat x 3 SOLUTION B (Antibody Detector) Leave for 10 minutes

39 TEST PROCEDURE Leave for 2 minutes Wash ONCE SOLUTION D
(Wash Solution) Repeat x 3 SOLUTION C (Developer) Leave for 2 minutes Wash ONCE

40 RESULT INTERPRETATION
Visually read results If specific-food IgG antibody is present, well is BLUE Determine strength of colour

41 RESULT INTERPRETATION
NEGATIVE WEAK POSITIVE POSITIVE STRONG POSITIVE White Pale blue Mid blue Dark blue IgG

42 RESULT INTERPRETATION
Ring / halo INVALID Negative Control must be WHITE Positive Control must be BLUE

43 RESULT INTERPRETATION
Identify reactive foods from IFU Record on Results Card

44 FOODS TESTED GRAINS Oat Wheat Rice Corn Rye Durum Wheat Gluten
DAIRY / EGGS Cow’s milk Whole egg VEGETABLES Broccoli Cabbage Carrot Celery Cucumber Leek Legume mix Mushroom Peppers Potato Soya Bean FISH / SEAFOOD White fix mix Freshwater mix Tuna Shellfish mix HERBS / SPICES Garlic Ginger FRUIT Apple Blackcurrant Grapefruit Melon mix Olive Orange and Lemon Strawberry Tomato NUTS / SEEDS Almond Brazil Nut Cashew Peanut Walnut MEAT Beef Chicken Lamb Pork OTHER Cocoa Bean Tea Yeast

45 Microarray Food Intolerance Test

46 FOODPRINT® LABORATORY TESTS
INDICATOR FOOD PANELS SPECIALISED

47 TEST FORMAT Food extracts ‘printed’ onto nitrocellulose pads

48 FOODPRINT® TESTING PROCESS
Finger-prick sample Send to lab FoodPrint microarray

49 FOODPRINT® TESTING PROCESS
Hi-res optical scan Data conversion Test Report

50 FOODPRINT® TEST REPORTS
Food Groups Order of Reactivity

51 FOODPRINT® REPORTS Traffic light system: ELEVATED (≥30 U/ml)
BORDERLINE (29-24 U/ml) NORMAL (≤23 U/ml) IgG concentration (U/ml)

52 INTERPRETATION OF RESULTS
ELEVATED – high level of antibody detected Eliminate food from diet for at least 3 months BORDERLINE – moderate level of antibody detected Reduce or rotate food for at least 3 months NORMAL – low level of antibody detected Food can be eaten freely

53 NEW PATIENT REPORT Test Reports + Patient Guidebook

54 FOODPRINT® BLOOD COLLECTION VIDEO

55

56 PRODUCT RANGE Details of the kits available are on our website and we have local distributors in most countries worldwide. All products have specialist support offered by the Product support team and technical experts at Genesis headquarters.

57 FEATURES Kits available for 5, 40, 93 or 109 foods
25µl serum or plasma Assay time <90 minutes 96 well plate assay, strip format Food IgG Elisa tests are available in multiple formats for 5, 40, 93 and 109 foods. The food groups are based on the most commonly found foods and from multiple food groups. Sample volumes are typically 10ul for serum or plasma which can be fresh or frozen at -20C. Whole blood can also be analysed but must be fresh. The assay time is around 90 minutes when performed manually, and the method is easily automated for greater efficiencies.

58 BENEFITS Ideal for small–moderate sample numbers Ready-to-use reagents
Short incubation steps Reliable results CE-marked kits Certified to ISO 9001 & 13458

59 Assay Procedure TEST PROCEDURE Incubate 30 minutes Wash Plate x 3
100µl conjugate into each well 10 minutes 100µl TMB substrate into each well 100µl Stop solution into each well Read 450nm Dispense samples, standards and controls 25µl sample into 10ml diluent The assay procedure is typical of the Genesis range of ELISA kits. All reagents are ready to use and colour coded for ease of use. Reaction times are typically 30, minute incubation allowing the flexibility of manual or automated techniques.

60 PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS
Reproducibility: Intra-assay % Sensitivity: 0.4U/ml Interferences: Grossly haemolysed, icteric or lipaemic samples should be avoided Stability: 18 months

61 TEST PRINCIPLES

62 TEST PRINCIPLES Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)
Standard laboratory method to detect antibodies and antigens MICROPLATE ELISA Plate FOODPRINT Microarray Pad FOOD DETECTIVE Reaction Tray

63 Antigens (food) attached to well

64 Y Y Y Diluted blood sample: Specific food IgG antibodies
Binds to food antigens

65 Y Y Y Detector solution / conjugate:
Contains enzyme (HRP) linked anti-human IgG Y Y Y Binds to food-specific IgG antibodies

66 Y Y Y Developer solution / TMB substrate
Enzyme HRP causes oxidation of substrate: Change from colourless to blue Y Y Y

67 ALTERNATIVE TEST METHODS

68 IgG4 ELISA White Blood Cell

69 Detects IgG4 antibodies associated with food allergies
IgG4 ELISA Detects IgG4 antibodies associated with food allergies

70 IgG SUBCLASSES SUBCLASS ABUNDANCE IgG1 66% IgG2 23% IgG3 7% IgG4 4%

71 IgG SUBCLASS PROPERTIES
NEUTRALISATION Ability of antibodies to neutralise the pathogenic effects of antigens: – block and inhibit biological effects COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION Ability of antibodies to activate complement cascade: consists of a group of 30 serum proteins destroy foreign cells by phagocytosis and lysis of cell membranes creates inflammation

72 IgG SUBCLASS PROPERTIES
OPSONISATION Ability of antibodies to ‘flag’ foreign cells/antigens for destruction: cells / antigens are destroyed by phagocytosis (macrophages and neutrophils) phagocytes need a ‘marker’ to identify what to destroy markers are antibodies and complement proteins (called opsonins) installation of opsonins enables phagocytosis BINDING TO PHAGOCYTES Ability of opsonin antibodies to bind to macrophages and neutrophils

73 IgG SUBCLASS PROPERTIES
PROPERTY IgG1 IgG2 IgG3 IgG4 Neutralisation ++ Activation of complement pathway + +++ Opsonisation Binding to macrophages Binding to neutrophils IgG1 and IgG3 have strong pro-inflammatory properties IgG4 has protective, anti-inflammatory properties

74 IgG4 FUNCTION Acts as a ‘blocking agent’ against the actions of IgE
Catches and neutralises the (food) antigen before IgE can bind to it IgG4 acts to prevent acute allergic reactions (Type I allergy) from occurring No complement activation and no opsonising capacities No involvement with Type III (IgG-mediated) food intolerance Impossible to detect ‘delayed-onset’ food intolerance by IgG4 testing!

75 PUBLICATIONS AGAINST IgG4 TESTING
Testing for IgG4 against foods is not recommended as a diagnostic tool. S. Stapel, R. Asero, B. K. Ballmer-Weber, E. F. Knol, S. Strobel, S. Vieths, J. Kleine-Tebbe. Allergy 2008: 63: 793–796 Conclusion: food-specific IgG4 does not indicate (imminent) food allergy or intolerance, but rather a physiological response of the immune system after exposure to food components. Testing of IgG4 to foods is considered as irrelevant for the laboratory work-up of food allergy or intolerance and should not be performed in case of food-related complaints.

76 PUBLICATIONS AGAINST IgG4 TESTING
All controlled studies for “food intolerance” are performed with total IgG No controlled clinical trials have been performed with IgG4

77 Tests for cellular responses to foreign substances in-vitro
WHITE BLOOD CELL TEST Tests for cellular responses to foreign substances in-vitro

78 WHITE BLOOD CELL TEST (Activated Neutrophil Test and Cytotoxic Test)
Principle: the diameter of white blood cells (leukocytes) change after being challenged with foods, moulds, additives, environmental chemicals, dyes and antibiotics. Incubation Activation of immune response in cell White Blood Cells (separated or EDTA blood) are exposed to antigens: Primary reactive leukocyte fraction consists of: Neutrophils

79 NEUTROPHIL DEGRANULATION
Food antigens bind to antibodies which are attached to surface of a neutrophil. Creates a “cross-linking” which induces a process known as degranulation. Neutrophil

80 NEUTROPHIL DEGRANULATION
Generates highly toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species Release powerful proteolytic enzymes / histamine / chemokines / heparin Damaging to pathogens but also damaging to host tissues

81 WHITE BLOOD CELL TEST Healthy cell Mild reaction Strong reaction

82 WHITE BLOOD CELL TEST Advantages Disadvantages
Errors eliminated due to computerised measurement Disadvantages Neutrophils are unstable - high risk of incorrect test results Morphologically change immediately after blood is drawn Reliable test results only if tested within 6 hours No possibility to send sample by mail Neutrophils are highly sensitive to drug intake and infections - risk of incorrect results Need an automated system to count cells

83 MANAGING FOOD INTOLERANCES

84 MANAGING FOOD INTOLERANCES
Identify foods producing elevated IgG response COMMON PROBLEM FOODS (data collated by CNS)

85 MANAGING FOOD INTOLERANCES
Remove or reduce reactive foods from diet PLAN THE DIET: Reduce “allergenic load” Compliance important for best results Plan / shop in advance Know your “problem” foods Read ingredients labels Substitute with similar alternatives Concentrate on NORMAL foods Variety – nutrients & intolerance

86 MANAGING FOOD INTOLERANCES
Remove or reduce reactive foods from diet Foods to avoid, include, recipes, menus, websites

87 MANAGING FOOD INTOLERANCES
Remove or reduce reactive foods from diet POINTS TO NOTE: Food must be included in diet before testing - no IgG reaction if food is not consumed! Avoid known allergenic foods – negative in IgG test Some clients may feel worse after elimination of reactive foods Immunosuppressants

88 MANAGING FOOD INTOLERANCES
Remove or reduce reactive foods from diet ADVICE FOR NUMEROUS ELEVATED RESULTS: Leaky Gut? Prioritise - 4 to 6 most reactive foods (reduce allergenic load) Rotate / reduce the remaining foods Work with symptoms and results

89 MANAGING FOOD INTOLERANCES
Repair Leaky Gut / boost immune system Re-populate gut with beneficial gut flora Strengthen the immune system Re-introduction of foods Avoid elevated foods for 3-6 months Still symptoms – probably not food intolerance Re-introduce foods – gradually Monitor symptoms Avoid for longer if necessary Eat in moderation and vary the diet

90 SUMMARY OF ADVICE Eliminate foods with strong reaction (ELEVATED foods) Reduce / rotate foods with moderate reaction (BORDERLINE foods) Eat foods freely from the NORMAL group Replace foods with a similar food from that food group Eat a varied diet Repair leaky gut Support immune system

91 SUPPORT DOCUMENTATION

92 Scientific Publications
Patient Experiences

93 SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
ADHD Autism Fertility Anti-Aging Gastrointestinal General Migraine Rheumatoid Arthritis Skin Conditions Weight Loss

94 Toward an understanding of allergy and in-vitro testing
GENERAL (GN1) Toward an understanding of allergy and in-vitro testing Mary James N.D. Great Smokies Diagnostic Laboratory

95 Toward an understanding of allergy and in-vitro testing
GENERAL (GN1) Toward an understanding of allergy and in-vitro testing Mary James N.D. Great Smokies Diagnostic Laboratory Excellent overview of: Immune system Food terminology – hypersensitivity and allergy Immune tolerance and overload Diagnosis Elimination diets Leaky gut

96 Testing for food reactions: the good, the bad, and the ugly
GENERAL (GN13) Testing for food reactions: the good, the bad, and the ugly Mullin GE, Swift KM, Lipski L, Turnbull LK, Rampertab SD Nutr Clin Pract 2010 Apr; 25(2):192-8

97 Testing for food reactions: the good, the bad, and the ugly
GENERAL (GN13) Testing for food reactions: the good, the bad, and the ugly Mullin GE, Swift KM, Lipski L, Turnbull LK, Rampertab SD Nutr Clin Pract 2010 Apr; 25(2):192-8 Literature review Evaluating the validity of tests used to assess food reactions Food hypersensitivity, food allergy, food sensitivity, food intolerance testing and adverse food reactions IgE–mediated food allergy testing was best represented in PubMed IgG–based testing showed promise, with clinically meaningful results Proven useful as a guide for elimination diets Further investigation into the clinical application is required

98 Dietary advice based on food specific IgG results
GENERAL (W1) Dietary advice based on food specific IgG results Geoffrey Hardman, Gillian Hart. Nutrition and food science Vol 37 No pp 16-23

99 Dietary advice based on food specific IgG results
GENERAL (W1) Dietary advice based on food specific IgG results Geoffrey Hardman, Gillian Hart. Nutrition and food science Vol 37 No pp 16-23 Provide evidence that elimination diet based on food-specific IgG testing is an effective, reliable and valid aid in the management of chronic illness Postal survey commissioned by Allergy UK – 5286 participants Questionnaire sent 3 months after IgG food test 76% reported a significant improvement in their condition 68% noticed a benefit within 3 weeks Those with more than 1 condition more likely to report noticeable improvement 92% reported a return of symptoms on reintroduction of offending foods

100 GASTROINTESTINAL (GA1)
Food elimination based on IgG antibodies in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a randomised controlled trial W Atkinson, T A Sheldon, N Shaath, PJ Whorwell Gut 2004:

101 GASTROINTESTINAL (GA1)
Food elimination based on IgG antibodies in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a randomised controlled trial W Atkinson, T A Sheldon, N Shaath, PJ Whorwell Gut 2004: To assess the therapeutic potential of dietary elimination based on presence of IgG antibodies to food 150 outpatients with IBS - 3 month study Diet excluding all foods to which they had raised IgG antibodies or a sham diet excluding the same number of foods but not those to which they had antibodies Outcome measures - change in IBS symptom severity and global rating scores True diet resulted in 26% greater reduction in symptom score than sham diet Relaxing the diet led to 24% greater deterioration in symptoms Food elimination based on IgG antibodies effective in reducing IBS symptoms

102 a double-blind cross-over diet intervention study
GASTROINTESTINAL (GA5) Clinical relevance of IgG antibodies against food antigens in Crohn’s Disease: a double-blind cross-over diet intervention study Bentz, Hausmann, Piberger, Kellermeier, Paul, Held, Falk, Obermeier, Fried, Schölmerich, Rogler Digestion 2010;81:252–264

103 a double-blind cross-over diet intervention study
GASTROINTESTINAL (GA5) Clinical relevance of IgG antibodies against food antigens in Crohn’s Disease: a double-blind cross-over diet intervention study Bentz, Hausmann, Piberger, Kellermeier, Paul, Held, Falk, Obermeier, Fried, Schölmerich, Rogler Digestion 2010;81:252–264 Immune responses against food antigens may be a reason for the perpetuation of inflammation associated with Crohn’s Disease (CD) 79 CD patients and 20 healthy controls were tested for food IgG antibodies Based on the IgG antibodies, a nutritional intervention was planned 84% patients had IgG antibodies against processed cheese and yeast Daily stool frequency decreased by 11% Abdominal pain reduced and general well-being improved

104 GASTROINTESTINAL (GA6)
Treating irritable bowel syndrome with a food elimination diet followed by food challenge and probiotics Drisko, Bischoff, Hall, McCallum. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 25, No. 6, 514–522 (2006)

105 GASTROINTESTINAL (GA6)
Treating irritable bowel syndrome with a food elimination diet followed by food challenge and probiotics Drisko, Bischoff, Hall, McCallum. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 25, No. 6, 514–522 (2006) Goal was to investigate the role of food intolerance in IBS patients 20 patients with IBS who had failed standard medical therapies Baseline IgE and IgG food/mould panels and stool analysis were performed Patients underwent food elimination diets based on their results Elevated serum IgG food/mould levels detected in 100% participants Significant improvement after food elimination and rotation diet Identifying food sensitivity in IBS impacts on overall well being and quality of life

106 Hernández, Pinto, Montiel. Revista Alergia México 2007;54(5):162-8
MIGRAINE (M2) Food allergy mediated by IgG antibodies associated with migraine in adults Hernández, Pinto, Montiel. Revista Alergia México 2007;54(5):162-8

107 Hernández, Pinto, Montiel. Revista Alergia México 2007;54(5):162-8
MIGRAINE (M2) Food allergy mediated by IgG antibodies associated with migraine in adults Hernández, Pinto, Montiel. Revista Alergia México 2007;54(5):162-8 Aim of study was to investigate allergen-specific IgG in patients with migraine 56 patients with migraine, control group without migraine Serum antibodies to specific 108 food allergens were measured Significant differences in number of positives for IgG food allergens between patients with migraine and a controlled group Elimination diets successfully control the migraine without need of medications Serum IgG antibodies to common food should be investigated in patients with migraine

108 SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
Abstracts Booklet Full Publications Excel Library

109 PATIENT EXPERIENCES Gastrointestinal Discomfort Aches & Pains
Chronic Fatigue Migraines & Headaches Skin Conditions Weight Issues

110 ACHES & PAINS Lesley, a retired PA from Ashford, Kent
Aching joints and muscles and flu-like symptoms Symptoms were worse after she had eaten wheat (especially bread) and dairy together August 2005, Lesley decided to do a food intolerance test (FoodPrint) Tested positive for wheat, yeast, cola nut and pineapple Lesley saw an improvement in her symptoms immediately Found alternatives to replace the wheat and yeast in particular Lesley has tried reintroducing some foods but finds that she reacts on each occasion

111 CHRONIC FATIGUE Tansy, a 36-year-old psychotherapist from Horncastle in Lincolnshire 4 years off work with M.E. - bedridden for up to 10 days a month Tansy decided to experiment with her diet after a friend advised her to try excluding certain foods Excluded nuts and eggs – felt slightly better Excluded wheat and replacing it with rye – felt worse Eliminating every possible food intolerance by trial and error was time consuming Decided to try Food Detective test Reacted to 20 foods, including wheat, rye, dairy, soya, nuts, egg, barley and crab Ironically, she reacted more to rye than wheat Tansy took the offending foods out of her diet and within the first week began to feel better

112 GASTROINTESTINAL DISCOMFORT
Sandra, 54, from Crawley, West Sussex Agonising bouts of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) - laid up in bed for days at time Over an 18 month period, Sandra underwent numerous medical investigations: - endoscopy, CT scan and multiple blood tests Eventually one doctor told her she had IBS and would just have to live with it Sandra went to see a nutritionist who suspected she was suffering from a food intolerance Performed a Food Detective test Intolerant to apples, wheat, almonds, rice, brazil nut, cashew nuts, cocoa beans, whole egg and shellfish Eliminated the foods and began to feel better Within a few weeks her IBS symptoms disappeared

113 MIGRAINES AND HEADACHES
Yvonne, a 58-year-old mum from Poringland in Norfolk Suffered for 12 years from fortnightly migraines Yvonne’s GP was helpful in providing medication to manage her migraines He never got to the root of what was actually causing them Decided to try Food Detective™ Reacted to soya bean, wheat, barley, corn, rye, cow’s milk, egg, grapefruit, almond and cashew Immediately avoided these foods and was felt better within a week

114 SKIN CONDITIONS James, 31, from Cambridge
Suffered from eczema - frustrating and difficult to function normally at work Prescribed various steroid creams and emollients but nothing addressed the cause of the eczema Started doing some research on the internet - link between food and eczema Decided to try a food intolerance test Reaction to cows’ milk, egg white and also grains and yeast James eliminated all the foods he was intolerant Effect on his eczema was astounding - within a couple of days it had completely cleared up Sleeping through the night and feeling much better for it Occasionally, James has a meal containing dairy foods or enjoys a couple of beers but the next day his eczema will flare up again

115 WEIGHT ISSUES Tina, 41-year-old from Forest Row, East Sussex
Grossly overweight - BMI was dangerously high – difficulty loosing weight Visited a local nutritional therapist Suggested she may be intolerant to some foods - could be inhibiting her weight loss Given a Food Detective test Tina tested positive to cow’s milk, citrus fruits and durum wheat Started using nut milk on cereal and in tea and stopped eating oranges and pasta

116 PATIENT EXPERIENCES Booklet Excel Library

117 DEMONSTRATION VIDEOS


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