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Medieval 1. No expressions on faces 2. Stiff and unrealistic poses Renaissance 1. Faces are filled with emotion and expression 2. Human poses are lifelike.

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Presentation on theme: "Medieval 1. No expressions on faces 2. Stiff and unrealistic poses Renaissance 1. Faces are filled with emotion and expression 2. Human poses are lifelike."— Presentation transcript:

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3 Medieval 1. No expressions on faces 2. Stiff and unrealistic poses Renaissance 1. Faces are filled with emotion and expression 2. Human poses are lifelike and realistic

4 Medieval 3. European art was the property of the Church – often religious themes, individuals were not important—paintings not signed 3. Tempura paints were used – dried too quickly to correct mistakes Renaissance 3. A rtists take credit for their work and become famous; also portraits are done of people 4. O il paints were used – lets artists work slowly, create new colors, and obtain more lifelike effects

5 Medieval 5. The Church forbids displaying the naked human body 6. There is no balance, proportion, or perspective – pictures are “flat” and two dimensional because the most important spiritual figures in the painting are larger than the less important ones. Renaissance 5. L ike the Greeks and Romans, artists study anatomy to portray humans realistically 6. A rtists create proportion with the illusion of depth and distance on the flat surface— called linear perspective. They also use new shading devices called sfumato and chiarascuro; they use geometry to achieve balance.

6 Medieval 7. Halos and gold backgrounds symbolized residents of heaven and the holy atmosphere of heaven Renaissance 7. Portrayed naturalistic landscapes of this world and saints lived in the same world as ordinary people

7 1. Realism & Expression Expulsion from the Garden Masaccio 1427 First nudes since classical times. SAINT DEMETRIUS OF SALONICA. High Middle Ages End of 14th century Before

8 The first known painting to apply Brunelleschi’s system of linear perspective. Church of Santa Maria Novella, Florence Before

9 2. Perspective Perspective! Perspective! Perspective! Perspective! Perspective! First use of linear perspective! Perspective! Perspective! The Trinity Masaccio 1427 What you are, I once was; what I am, you will become.

10 Progression of the Use of Perspective 1280’s 1480’s1380’s

11 Perspective!Perspective! Betrothal of the Virgin Raphael1504

12 3. Classicism and Realism Greco-Roman influence. Secularism. Humanism. Individualism  free standing figures. Symmetry/Balance The “Classical Pose” Medici “Venus” (1c)

13 Birth of Venus – Botticelli, 1485 An attempt to depict perfect beauty.

14 Examples of Humanism and Realism in Renaissance Art Botticelli's Birth of Venus Rembrandt’s The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp

15 Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man Examples of Humanism and Realism in Renaissance Art

16 4. Emphasis on Individualism Batista Sforza & Federico de Montefeltre: The Duke & Dutchess of Urbino Piero della Francesca,

17 Vitruvian Man Leonardo da Vinci 1492 The L’uomo universale

18 5. Geometrical Arrangement of Figures The Dreyfus Madonna with the Pomegranate Leonardo da Vinci 1469 The figure as architecture!

19 Raphael’s Canagiani Madonna, 1507

20 6. Light & Shadowing/Softening Edges Chiaroscuro Sfumato Leonardo da Vinci described sfumato as "without lines or borders, in the manner of smoke or beyond the focus plane."

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22 Famous works by Italian Renaissance Artists Michelangelo Leonardo Raphael Donatello

23 The Renaissance “Man” Broad knowledge about many things in different fields. Deep knowledge/skill in one area. Able to link information from different areas/disciplines and create new knowledge. The Greek ideal of the “well-rounded man” was at the heart of Renaissance education. Artist Sculptor Architect Scientist Engineer Inventor

24 Leonardo da Vinci, The Virgin of the Rocks Leonardo da Vinci 

25 Leonardo, the Artist: From his Notebook of over 5000 pages ( )

26 Leonardo Da Vinci Why is Mona Lisa so famous? Mona Lisa (La Giocande) Oil on wood panel Fun Fact! Notice her lack of eyebrows! Women during this period would shave them off! It was considered fashionable to do so!

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28 Gospel Book of Bernward of Hildesheim, c German

29 Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan, Italy

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31 horizontal vertical Perspective! The Last Supper - da Vinci, 1498

32 The Last Supper - da Vinci, 1498 & Geometry

33 Refractory Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie Milan

34 Detail of Jesus The Last Supper Leonardo da Vinci 1498 Deterioration

35 The Last Supper Tempera and mixed media on Plaster

36 Leonardo, the Sculptor An Equestrian Statue 

37 Leonardo, the Architect: Pages from his Notebook Study of a central church. 1488

38 Leonardo, the Architect: Pages from his Notebook Plan of the city of Imola, 1502.

39 Leonardo, the Scientist (Biology): Pages from his Notebook An example of the humanist desire to unlock the secrets of nature.

40 Leonardo, the Scientist (Anatomy): Pages from his Notebook

41 Leonardo, the Inventor: Pages from his Notebook

42 Man Can Fly?

43 A study of siege defenses. Studies of water-lifting devices. Leonardo, the Engineer: Pages from his Notebook

44 Above: Gospel Book of Philip the Fair Right: Vivian Bible

45 David by Donatello 1430 First free-form bronze since Roman times! The Liberation of Sculpture

46 David Verrocchio David Verrocchio

47 David Michelangelo Buonarotti 1504 Marble

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49  15c 16c  What a difference a century makes!

50 The Pieta Michelangelo Buonarroti 1499 marble The Popes as Patrons of the Arts

51 Michelangelo The Sistine Chapel Fresco “The Creating of Adam”

52 The Sistine Chapel Michelangelo Buonarroti Film Clip

53 The Sistine Chapel’s Ceiling Michelangelo Buonarroti

54 The Sistine Chapel Details The Creation of the Heavens

55 The Sistine Chapel Details Creation of Man

56 The Sistine Chapel Details The Fall from Grace

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60 The Sistine Chapel Details The Last Judgment

61 The School of Athens Fresco (water color on plaster)

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63 The School of Athens – Raphael, One point perspective. All of the important Greek philosophers and thinkers are included  all of the great personalities of the Seven Liberal Arts! A great variety of poses. Located in the papal apartments library. Raphael worked on this commission simultaneously as Michelangelo was doing the Sistine Chapel. No Christian themes here.

64 The School of Athens – Raphael, Raphael Da Vinci Michelangelo

65 Aristotle: looks to this earth [the here and now]. Plato: looks to the heavens [or the IDEAL realm]. The School of Athens – Raphael, details

66 Averroes Hypatia Pythagoras

67 Zoroaster Ptolemy Euclid

68 Clockwise: Plato (Leonardo), Aristotle, Raphael, Michelangelo

69 Medieval Artwork Renaissance Artwork Raphael: The Nymph Galatea


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