Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Mask Making!!. Animal Masks!!

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Mask Making!!. Animal Masks!!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Mask Making!!

2

3

4

5

6 Animal Masks!!

7

8 Plaster Cast Tape Masks To make a good mask of your creature, it's important to take some time to make a plan. The plaster face mask is often just the base, to which we add ears, horns, beaks, and noses. Compare your face shape to that of your animal. Plaster cast tape is a good material for making a beautiful, strong mask. Working in pairs, students can make the base shell of the mask for both partners in under an hour.

9 Materials Plaster cast tape scissors Warm water petroleum jelly Old sheet to cover clothes optional: floor covering Headband for hair paper towels (recycled) Small plastic bags string for tying the mask on Open bowl for each pair of students

10 Procedure Cut the cast tape into strips of about 1 x 4 inches. Cutting a variety of sizes can be helpful. Keep the strips out of range of spilling or dripping water, as wet tape will harden before you apply it to the face, making it useless. Smear a coat of petroleum jelly all over the face area to be covered by the mask, concentrating on the eyebrows and hairline. When the plaster hardens, any hair stuck in it will pull out. Dip the strips into the warm water, just long enough to get them wet, and begin applying them to the face. Notice the difference between the sides of the tape. One side has more plaster on it. Apply the tape with this side out, and rub the tape until all extra plaster is spread around, covering the cotton cloth of the tape and all the holes. Using the diagram at right, outline the perimeter of the mask neatly, generously overlapping each piece for strength. At this time the "patient" must keep very still; no laughing or moving the face for minutes. Cover the entire area with three layers of the tape, repeating the initial pattern. Make the mask strong in narrow places like down the bridge of the nose. For most animals, the eyes should be circles symmetrically placed on the face. don't worry about snouts, horns, or ears at this time. Details can be added later. After ten to fifteen minutes, the mask can be removed. By tilting the head forward and scrunching up the face, the mask may be loosened. In some cases, you may have to gently work the mask off the face. Use some loosely wadded newspaper to support the mask while it dries. Set aside for 24 hours to dry. Noses, Beaks and Ears Dozens of materials can be used to make these features. The most accurate features are made by using a template or pattern. Using a piece of scrap paper, cut a piece for the nose or ear. don't forget to leave tabs for attaching the piece to the mask. Now test fit this piece to the mask. When you make a design you like, cut a final version from heavy paper or screen wire. You can use a stapler or a new layer of cast tape to bind the new parts to the mask. Materials that work well include paper towel or toilet paper rolls, yogurt containers, balloons, wads of paper towel. These can be formed into a muzzle for a dog or cat. Sculpted Clay Forms for Snouts Begin with the plaster mask, leaving the nose and mouth open (Figure A). Sculpt from clay the snout of the animal of your choice (Figure B). Insert it from behind into the plaster mask (Figure C). Rub petroleum jelly on the clay snout and cover the snout with several layers of plaster tape, attaching it to the face of the mask. Allow to dry one-half hour (Figure D). Dig out clay from behind the mask. You may have to cut away parts of the original mask. Do not allow the clay to dry in place, or your mask will be too heavy to wear. Allow the mask to dry 24 hours before

11 Procedure Cont… Using the diagram at above, outline the perimeter of the mask neatly, generously overlapping each piece for strength. At this time the "patient" must keep very still; no laughing or moving the face for minutes. Cover the entire area with three layers of the tape, repeating the initial pattern. Make the mask strong in narrow places like down the bridge of the nose. For most animals, the eyes should be circles symmetrically placed on the face. don't worry about snouts, horns, or ears at this time. Details can be added later. After ten to fifteen minutes, the mask can be removed. By tilting the head forward and scrunching up the face, the mask may be loosened. In some cases, you may have to gently work the mask off the face. Use some loosely wadded newspaper to support the mask while it dries. Set aside for 24 hours to dry.

12 Noses, Beaks, Ears Dozens of materials can be used to make these features. The most accurate features are made by using a template or pattern. Using a piece of scrap paper, cut a piece for the nose or ear. don't forget to leave tabs for attaching the piece to the mask. Now test fit this piece to the mask. When you make a design you like, cut a final version from heavy paper or screen wire. You can use a stapler or a new layer of cast tape to bind the new parts to the mask. Materials that work well include paper towel or toilet paper rolls, yogurt containers, balloons, wads of paper towel. These can be formed into a muzzle for a dog or cat.

13


Download ppt "Mask Making!!. Animal Masks!!"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google