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St Swithun’s Open Meeting 30 th June 2014. What is the state of the church? ( Hint, look around you) The architect’s report identified some urgent issues.

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Presentation on theme: "St Swithun’s Open Meeting 30 th June 2014. What is the state of the church? ( Hint, look around you) The architect’s report identified some urgent issues."— Presentation transcript:

1 St Swithun’s Open Meeting 30 th June 2014

2 What is the state of the church? ( Hint, look around you) The architect’s report identified some urgent issues – which we are fixing Also many significant structural repairs are needed It is critical that we prevent water coming in and stop the damp, this is especially bad in the tower Since the inspection in August 2013 further damage has occurred, both inside and out Now we want to be bold, “stop the rot” and secure the building for future generations

3 Architect’s report summary Quinquennial works required Cost £ 1. Emergency repair Churchyard wall Re-build the boundary wall near the war memorial (A) 7, Maintenance to roofs and gutters Repairs to roof lead-work and flashings, pointing (A) Minor repairs to gutters (B) Additional lightning conductor (B) 2, Tower Exploratory work to south face to find cause of damp (A) Repairs to wall south face to prevent water penetrating (A) Additional repairs to west and north faces, including south west and northwest buttresses (B) Tower arch (internal) – plaster repairs and conservation (A) 43, External walls, windows, rainwater disposal Conservation work to blocked north doorway (A) Repair/replacement of windows on north side of aisle, (£53,000) (B) Repair of windows on south side of aisle (£10,000) (B) Porch repairs (£12,000) (B and C) 98, Internal repairs – includes cost of birdcage scaffolding Chancel ceiling repairs and re-decoration (£20,000) (A) Nave plasterwork and re-decoration (£15,000) South aisle, repair plaster and re-decorate (£6,000) B/C North aisle re-decorate (£6,000) C 54,600 Total206,382 A: repairs required within 2 years, B: within 5 years, C: after 5 years

4 Examples of repairs needed

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6 New damage since August ‘13 (inspection date) Unless we act now, the damage and cost will only increase

7 Also work is needed to allow the bells to continue to be rung enjoyably The bells were restored for the millennium and have been rung regularly since 2000 – They mark church services and many national events However they are not easy to ring, so further work is needed, including retuning It is estimated that this may cost ~£40,000, of which £22,000 has already been raised It makes sense to work together to ensure the tower is in a fit state to support continued ringing

8 Anything else? The architect’s estimates are based on his experience Following detailed evaluations and estimates from builders the numbers could go up (or down) – We do need builders with the right expertise – Many of our current problems come from past use of inappropriate materials and methods We would also like to add basic amenities – such as water, a toilet and a sink to make it more useful to the community This is not included in the architect’s estimates

9 Funding for our church - where does the money come from? There is no direct government support for the Church of England The Church of England had to pay ~£900 million (in 2005) for Running costs, buildings (churches, vicarages, church halls), worship, clergy salaries, pensions, training etc. Two thirds of this came from individuals, donations, fundraising and grants Only one third came from historic endowments, investments, property and local diocese investments All individual parishes have to meet their own costs – for a small parish this is a BIG challenge Also, there is no direct CoE support for church buildings

10 Funding for our church - where does the money come from? There is no direct government support for the Church of England The Church of England’s total outgoings were ~£900 million in 2005 Covers running costs, buildings (churches, vicarages), worship, clergy salaries, pensions, training etc. One third of the income comes from historic endowments, investments, property and local diocese investments Two thirds comes from individuals, donations, fundraising and grants All individual parishes have to meet their own costs – for a small parish this is a BIG challenge Also, there is no direct CoE support for church buildings

11 Where does the money go to? St Swithun’s budget (excluding repairs) is £16,000 per annum For heat, light, insurance, contributions to clergy costs etc We have 18 people on our Electoral Roll (regular churchgoers) Over the last 5 years we have raised £8,000 from fundraising events – Open Gardens, Christmas cards, Barn Dance, Harvest Supper etc. But we have spent £40,000 on repairs (includes grants) – Major repairs to the churchyard wall – Emergency work to the west face of the tower – Repair of the clock (funded by the Parish Council) – Glazing repairs to the clerestory windows (high up) on the north wall

12 Previous works: window repair Original quotation (for extensive repairs to several windows) was £10,000s. We managed to find expert glaziers and paid <£1,000 Holes and cracks were causing water to leak in

13 How can we find the money to support the necessary repair and restoration? Grants, there are many different types – Most are small or for specific purposes, glass, organs, bells etc. English Heritage no longer supports church repair Heritage Lottery Fund give Grants for Listed Places of Worship – up to £250,000 Includes on-going maintenance of the place of worship Also toilets or kitchens, improvements to heating or electrical systems, or other works supporting wider community use But it is very competitive – no guarantee our application would be successful

14 Our plans fit with the Heritage Lottery Fund requirements Priority for Grants for Places of Worship programme is to: Support structural repairs urgently required within the next two years – That have been clearly identified and defined in a survey such as a Quinquennial Inspection HLF conditions of funding: Project is defined at the outset Not yet started Will take no more than three years to complete Will contribute towards achieving heritage and community outcomes

15 Heritage Lottery Fund - requirements Project funded by Grants for Places of Worship need to achieve: Outcome for heritage: – With the investment, heritage will be in better condition Outcome for communities: – With the investment, more people and a wider range of people will have engaged with heritage We also need to meet part of the costs ourselves – 5% of the costs of the development phase – and 5% of the costs of the delivery phase

16 How can the church building serve the community, how can the community use the building? Ideas for using the building: – Library – already started – Information point – Meeting space – Rehearsal space – Monthly coffee morning But we lack basic facilities (water, toilet) so adding these will make it more usable What would you like to use it for?

17 Together we can maintain this historic and beautiful church as a living community asset We are a small community with a very challenging target We have set ourselves a target of £50,000 So we want your ideas and enthusiasm to help us secure our heritage for future generations How can you help? Money (or course!) Join an appeals committee Involve others and organisations that might contribute money Help with approaches to potential funding bodies Organise enjoyable fund raising events…..


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