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1 Workforce Investment Act Individual Service Strategy Youth Goals Literacy and Numeracy.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Workforce Investment Act Individual Service Strategy Youth Goals Literacy and Numeracy."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Workforce Investment Act Individual Service Strategy Youth Goals Literacy and Numeracy

2 2 Individual Service Strategy What is an Individual Service Strategy (ISS)? An ISS is a plan that provides a framework for identifying individual goals and strategies needed to help enhance the youth’s capabilities, while guiding their on- going development.

3 3 Individual Service Strategy The ISS is required by law and must be completed within 30 days of the date of participation. [Act 129(c)(1)(B); 20 CFR ] A new service strategy is not required if the provider carrying out such a program determines it is appropriate to use a recent service strategy developed for the participant under another educational or training program.

4 4 Individual Service Strategy (ISS) Purpose of an ISS: Serves as a Planning Tool Addresses Youth Goals and Service Strategies Reflects Achievement Objectives Leads to Academic and Occupational Success

5 5 Individual Service Strategy ISS Characteristics should include: Identifying Information Summary of Assessment Information Measurable Short-term and Long-term Goals Services and Other Resources Needed Organizations and/or Individuals that will provide services & Resources Tasks and Responsibilities of the Youth, Case Manger, Family Members and Others.

6 6 Individual Service Strategy The ISS process should include: Clear action statements that are tied to the goals set by the youth and the case manger Time-table for completion of the goals Regular review with youth of both planned and accomplished goals Refinement of existing goals, objectives and action plan Re-tooling by changing directions as needed

7 7 Individual Service Strategy 10 Program Elements: [WIA section 129(c)(2); 20 CFR ] Local WIA programs must make the following services available to youth participants: Tutoring Alternative Secondary School Summer Employment Paid and Unpaid Work Experience Occupational Skills Training Leadership Development

8 8 Individual Service Strategy Program Elements Continued…… Supportive Services Adult Mentoring Follow-up Service Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Note: RWBs have the discretion to determine what specific program services will be provided to a youth participant based on each participant’s objective assessment and individual service strategy.

9 9 Key Component in developing an ISS Youth Goals (Applies to Younger Youth Only)

10 10 Youth Goals Goals are the anticipated result which guide action.

11 11 Youth Goals SMART Goals: (S)pecific (M)easurable (A)ttainable (R)ealistic (T)imely

12 12 Youth Goals TEGL & State Memorandum-Setting Goals For Younger Youth April 8, 2008 All WIA youth between the ages of who receive youth services are required to have a minimal of one goal per year.

13 13 Youth Goals TEGL & State Memorandum Continued... The first goal set date must be the date of the first youth service. If the youth is basic skills deficient, a basic skills goal must be set. A maximum of three goals per year may be set.

14 14 Youth Goals TEGL & State Memorandum Continued... The target date for accomplishing each skill goal must be set no later than one year from the date the goal was set. The requirement to set a goal for younger youth on their anniversary date is no longer required when the youth has an open goal. Goals can be set as needed; however, and open goal should be maintained at all times.

15 15 An additional Basic Skills goal must be set if the youth’s most recent post- assessment results show reading or math levels are below the 9 th grade level. 9.0 Grade Level 7.0 Grade Level 5.0 Grade Level Youth Goals TEGL & State Memorandum Continued...

16 16 Youth Goals TEGL & State Memorandum Continued... A goal not achieved by the due date does not count as a positive attainment.

17 17 Youth Goals TEGL & State Memorandum Continued... Goal Types: Basic Skills Occupational Skills Work Readiness

18 18 Youth Goals Basic Skills Work Readiness Skills Occupational Skills TEGL & State Memorandum Continued...

19 19 Youth Goals TEGL Continued... Basic Skills Goals: A measurable increase in basic education skills; Reading Comprehension Math Computation Other Areas  Writing  Speaking  Listening  Problem Solving  Reasoning

20 20 Youth Goals TEGL Continued... Occupational Skills Goal: A measurable increase in primary occupational skills; Encompassing the proficiency to perform actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at entry, intermediate or advance levels

21 21 Youth Goals TEGL Continued... Occupational Skills Goal cont… Secondary occupational skills entail familiarity with and use of; Set-up Procedures Safety Measures Work- Related Terminology Record Keeping and Paperwork Formats Tools, Equipment and Materials, and Breakdown and Clean-up Routines

22 22 Youth Goals TEGL Continued... Work Readiness Skills Goal: A measurable increase in work readiness skills including; World-of-Work Awareness Labor Market Knowledge Occupational Information Values Clarification and Personal Understanding Career Planning and Decision Making Job Search Techniques

23 23 Youth Goals TEGL Continued... Work Readiness Skills Goal cont… Also include positive work habits and behaviors such as; Punctuality and Regular Attendance Presenting a Neat Appearance Getting along and working well with others Exhibiting good conduct Following Instructions and completing task Accepting Constructive Criticism Show initiative and responsibility

24 24 Youth Goals TEGL Continued... Work Readiness Skills Goal cont… They also encompass survival/daily living skills; Using the Phone Telling Time Shopping Renting an Apartment Opening a Bank Account Using Public Transportation

25 25 Youth Goals TEGL Continued... Work Readiness Skills Goal cont… This category also entails; Developing Motivation Adaptability Obtaining Effective Coping and Problem-Solving Skills Acquiring an Improved Self Image Note: Attainment of a Work Readiness Skills Certificate will not count as a credential attainment.

26 26 Literacy & Numeracy

27 27 Literacy and Numeracy TEGL & State Final Guidance -062 Using the Literacy and Numeracy Table in Employ Florida Marketplace (EFM) to Record Assessment for all Youth Official Definition Of those out-of-school youth who are basic skills deficient: The number of participants who increase one or more educational functioning levels divided by the number of participants who have completed a year in the program (i.e.., one year from the date of first youth program service) plus the number of participants who exit before completing a year in the program.

28 28 Literacy and Numeracy TEGL & FG-062 Continued… Calculation: Number of participants who increase one or more educational functioning levels Number of participants who have completed a year in the program + the number of participants who exit before completing a year in the program

29 29 Recording Assessment in the Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM Effective August 1, 2007, all grade level assessment scores must be recorded in the Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM. This includes all in-school and out-of-school youth. [State Final Guidance #062] The purpose of this issuance is to provide guidance regarding the accurate way to record assessment results for Basic Skills Deficient (BSD) youth as it relates to: Common Measures Literacy and Numeracy Gains and The Balanced Scorecard Report WIA Youth Average Gaines measure

30 30 Recording Assessment in the Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM FG-062 Continued… Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM Literacy and Numeracy Gains Measure Youth Average Grade Gain Measure All BSD YouthOut-of School Youth who are BSD

31 31

32 32 Recording Assessment in the Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM FG-062 Continued… General rules: All youth must be assessed in basic reading and math. The instructions apply to in-school and out-of– school youth. Measures average increase in literacy and numeracy grade levels and gains in educational functioning score (raw score). Individuals who are not BSD based on pre-test results are excluded from measurement.

33 33 Recording Assessment in the Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM FG-062 Continued… Participant’s First Year: An initial test (pre-test) must be given within 30 days of the Date of First Youth Service. If a previous test was conducted (i.e., by a partner program) within six months prior to the Date of First Youth Service, then that test score can be used and recorded in EFM (if the test is appropriate). The participant’s grade level increase is included in the measure, even if they exit prior to the end of the first year.

34 34 Recording Assessment in the Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM FG-062 Continued… Participant’s First Year continued…. Exit can occur at any time, but post-test must be given prior to exit. The post-test can be at any time within the first year, but must be given prior to or on the anniversary date. The same standardized assessment tool (currently TABE) must be used at both the pre-test and post-test.

35 35 Recording Assessment in the Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM FG-062 Continued… Participant’s First Year Continued…. Multiple progress post-tests can be given throughout the year; however, if no test is changed to a post test, then the latest test date, i.e., the test date entered on the anniversary or the closest date prior to the anniversary, will be the score reported regardless of whether or not it was a higher or lower score than any of the previous post assessments that were conducted during the year. A grade level increase could come from either a reading score or a math score, but need not be a gain from both in order to be reflected in this measure. Post-test must be within one year of participation, not one year from pre-test.

36 36 Recording Assessment in the Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM FG-062 Continued… Participant’s Second and Subsequent Years: Participants, who remain basic skills deficient after completing a full year in the program, must continue to receive basic skills remediation services. The participant’s first year post-test now becomes the second year’s pre-test and so on. New progress tests can be given at any time prior to or on the anniversary date.

37 37 Recording Assessment in the Literacy and Numeracy Table in EFM FG-062 Continued… Participant’s Second and Subsequent Years: If the participant exits prior to the anniversary of the participation year (in year two and three), then the participant is excluded from the measure whether or not he/she completed the appropriate post-test. Those participants who exit with a global exclusion (death, health/medical, family care, institutionalized, Reservists called back to duty, and relocation to a mandated residential facility) are excluded from this performance measure. Participants who are no longer basic skills deficient based on post-test results are no longer included in this measure.

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39 39 Questions or Additional Information Policy and Technical Assistance:  Barbara Walker, Government Operations Consultant II Address: Telephone Number: (850)  Tammy Bacon, Government Operations Consultant II Address: Telephone Number: (850)  Mershal Noble, Government Operations Consultant II Address: Telephone Number: (850)  Dehryl McCall, Senior Management Analyst Supervisor Address: Telephone Number: (850) An equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711.


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