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Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 1 Working Fire Training 06-1 Training Materials FIRELINE Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath Hurricane.

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Presentation on theme: "Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 1 Working Fire Training 06-1 Training Materials FIRELINE Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath Hurricane."— Presentation transcript:

1 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 1 Working Fire Training 06-1 Training Materials FIRELINE Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath Discussion HANDS-ON Hurricane Katrina: Response & Preparedness Hurricane Katrina: Response & Preparedness Quiz TRAINING Click here to view show in its entirety Click here to view show in its entirety EVOLUTIONS 2000 Kramer vs. Kramer Program Quiz Answers

2 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 2 OPERATIONS For all intents and purposes, we are catching an incident still in progress. “Size-up” and “Dispatch” have long since passed. At this stage, we are into a protracted Overhaul mode that still has a life-saving Search & Rescue component. Assistance from outside was also still being given to NOFD in the area of relief for regular firefighting response. This is the kind of situation that most strike force teams from outside the area will find themselves. Fireline Incident: Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath 06-1 Training Materials

3 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 3 06-1 Training Materials SEARCH & RESCUE All structures were searched in pairs. All crews carried forcible entry tools such as: –Halligan –Sledge Hammers –Axes –Pry bars Fireline Incident: Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath

4 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 4 06-1 Training Materials SEARCH & RESCUE A team leader also functioned as I.C., Safety, and Communications Officer. –Periodic status reports of search were given, including reports of unusual items found such as guns. USAR markings were used to indicate search status of structures. Fireline Incident: Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath

5 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 5 OVERHAUL & DECONTAMINATION Crews working at this stage of the incident will find themselves in a repetitive routine of the same kind of work. Search & Rescue (or recovery) of the entire New Orleans area demanded many personnel hours. Because of the dangers still in evidence to search crews such as disease contamination and other airborne hazards such as mold, Face masks were worn and Decon was a necessity after every shift. Fireline Incident: Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath 06-1 Training Materials

6 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 6 LESSONS LEARNED Days were long and work was exhausting There was some personal jeopardy at risk in terms of the danger of disease. Plush accommodations won’t be in evidence. Don’t go on a deployment such as this expecting any. You don’t mind it so much as you know the responders you are there to support would do it for you. Fireline Incident: Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath 06-1 Training Materials

7 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 7 Department Discussion The departments involved in this month’s training pose some discussion questions that you can use as discussion-starters in your own department’s training sessions. How will your department handle these scenarios? 06-1 Training Materials

8 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 8 Fire Response/New Orleans, LA Captain Darryl Klumpp, New Orleans Fire Dept. If a disaster the size of Katrina were to hit your jurisdiction, be prepared to scramble! You will be overrun and undermanned. Your department will have to move up the response chain as high as necessary to get you the resources you need. Be prepared to have other departments or strike forces from other places come in and take your place. That means that well-intentioned strangers will be running your apparatus and gear. You’re going to have to step aside and trust them. 06-1 Training Materials Fireline Incident Discussion

9 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 9 Fire Response/New Orleans, LA Captain Darryl Klumpp, New Orleans Fire Dept. Realize that you won’t be able to do it all. Understand that no one will expect you to do it all, or for long periods of time. At some point, you will have to look after yourself, your family, get some rest, etc. 06-1 Training Materials Fireline Incident Discussion

10 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 10 Search & Rescue / St. Bernard Parish Chief Glenn Dorner, Monroe Co. (GA) Emerg. Services If you move into an area far from you own jurisdiction, be as ready as you can for anything! Depending on how intense and widespread the disaster is will have a lot to do with what kind of creature comforts are available. Bring your own toiletries, perhaps some body wipes, and maybe even some Meals Ready to Eat (MRE’s) if you aren’t sure that food and shelter will be provided. Be ready for long hours on the job. You’re there to get things back to normal as quickly as possible so expect long shifts. Also expect plenty of physical exertion! 06-1 Training Materials Fireline Incident Discussion

11 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 11 Search & Rescue / St. Bernard Parish Chief Glenn Dorner, Monroe Co. (GA) Emerg. Services One of the reasons we do this for other jurisdictions is that one day we may need them to do it for us. [See Volume 05-7, Evolutions 2000, “9/11 Observance in Utica, Illinois”]. It’s what makes the American Fire Service the unique institution that it is. Serve with pride knowing you’re part of great, long-standing tradition! 06-1 Training Materials Fireline Incident Discussion

12 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 12 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness DISASTER RESPONSE STRUCTURE General –Response to widespread disasters is orchestrated by a series of local, state, and ultimately, federal control points that orchestrate the calls for response, from higher levels and more remote regions if need be, and the organization and acquisition of resources.

13 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 13 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness DISASTER RESPONSE STRUCTURE OEM –Most areas and/or counties will have an Office of Emergency Management (OEM) or a similarly-named agency, that is tasked with preparing members of local government, law enforcement, and the public and private sectors, with how to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters.

14 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 14 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness DISASTER RESPONSE STRUCTURE OEM –The OEM staff coordinates and interacts with many public and private sector planning commissions and groups in order to be better prepared in the event of a disaster. The OEM staff works in concert with the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA), and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This forms the framework of the stair-step approach described above.

15 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 15 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness DISASTER RESPONSE STRUCTURE OEM –EOC The OEM also controls or oversees an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) a uniquely designed, self- contained, tactical center, often built underground. EOCs may also have mobile command units, often housed in trailers, that can be transported to affected areas if the stationary EOC is too far away.

16 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 16 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness DISASTER RESPONSE STRUCTURE OEM –LEPC Areas may also have Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPC), also under the control of the OEM, that oversee hazardous material responses with the help of Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Teams (HMERT) by providing training and funding for equipment purchases.

17 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 17 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness DISASTER RESPONSE STRUCTURE SEMA –If the disaster is occupying the resources of a number of contiguous jurisdictions and/or counties, then state-wide mobilization occurs, most likely through the various State Emergency Management Agencies (SEMA).

18 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 18 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness DISASTER RESPONSE STRUCTURE SEMA –SEMA gets involved if: the devastation covers multiple OEMs within one state if multiple states are involved, so communications can emanate from a central point, or if the devastation in a more local area is so severe or such specialized assistance is needed, that assistance must be brought in from nearby states.

19 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 19 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness DISASTER RESPONSE STRUCTURE FEMA –Should the devastation be so widespread or so intense that local and state manpower and resources are insufficient, then federal disaster assistance becomes available through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This can bring specialized strike force teams such as USAR, Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMAT) and the National Guard and/or other military personnel or troops.

20 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 20 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness DISASTER RESPONSE STRUCTURE FEMA FEMA aid is not automatic. Though it may be available, it must be asked for by the jurisdictional heads that need it (mayors, governors, etc.). Unless it’s asked for, FEMA aid will not be deployed! In the cases of obvious pending disasters such as hurricanes where FEMA aid is almost always needed and asked for, FEMA may stage appropriate manpower and resources in advance of the disaster, just to be ready. Again, it may not be requested by local authorities and the staged manpower may return home without serving.

21 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 21 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness OPTIONS IN THE LOCAL CHAIN OF RESPONSE First Responders –First Responders (FRs) respond to a disaster. If it's more than they can handle, these originating FRs will probably call for Mutual Aid. –What happens next will first depend upon the geographical extent, and second, the intensity of the disaster. Mutual Aid –If the Mutual Aid companies are not responding to the same disaster in their own jurisdiction, they'll render Mutual Aid. If the disaster is affecting them also, they won't be available to the original FRs who asked for aid.

22 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 22 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness OPTIONS IN THE LOCAL CHAIN OF RESPONSE OEM –At this point, the OEM probably will get involved as aid requests move outward in a stair-step manner, first by jurisdiction, and then probably by county, until an available department or response unit is found. –Depending upon the kind of response needed will determine exactly what kind of response will be summoned and from what location. For example, this might be a local hazardous materials response team (HMERT) or a Search & Rescue task force from the local area, or from farther away, if the devastation locally is tying up all local teams.

23 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 23 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness OPTIONS IN THE LOCAL CHAIN OF RESPONSE Total Preparation –In the final analysis, we cannot be completely prepared for every disaster that may occur, due to the variation in severity, location, or specialty of resources needed. –All these factors will combine to determine different response needs, with varying amounts of manpower and/or equipment, for various lengths of time, from various locations, some of which may be remote. –However, we can and must learn from previous experiences to understand the possible range of preparation needed.

24 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 24 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness RESTORATION OF INFRASTRUCTURE Access –Disaster response and rescue operations will not occur if access to the affected areas is not possible. The key to any disaster response is to get the infrastructure up and running as soon as possible. This will include: Roads Communications Basic electrical service

25 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 25 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness RESTORATION OF INFRASTRUCTURE Prearrangements –Preplanned and predesignated partnerships and arrangements between FRs and organizations who serve and are responsible for the infrastructure must be made. –These might include local highway and street departments, city managers, and private construction companies that can supply the necessary equipment and trained manpower.

26 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 26 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness RESTORATION OF INFRASTRUCTURE Isolation –After a disaster, there will be a certain amount of initial isolation in the affected area; the amount of which will be determined by the severity of the devastation and the remoteness of the affected area. –This isolation can be minimized by the aforementioned preplans and, in the case of physical remoteness, by earlier-than-normal requests for aid being given to generate response mobilization sooner. Get the cavalry coming! –It's possible that an area might have to be served by its own FRs alone for 48 hours before help may arrive.

27 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 27 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness NEEDS OF THE REMOTE RESPONDER (RR) RENDERING LONG-DISTANCE MUTUAL AID What can be expected by the RR? –The remote responder can be called at any time, to go almost anywhere, and should be prepared for that eventuality. –Schedules and working hours may/will change; long hours in service may be required. –Amenities may be scarce or unavailable; to put it mildly, the RR will be inconvenienced. –If the infrastructure becomes non-functional or non-serving, the RR will have to go into a survival mode. The RR should at least bring an extra change of clothes.

28 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 28 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness NEEDS OF THE REMOTE RESPONDER (RR) RENDERING LONG-DISTANCE MUTUAL AID What must be provided for the RR? –Departments and Emergency Service Response Unit managers must provide provisions and basic equipment for RRs who come into their area: MREs (Meals Ready to Eat) or other military ration options if food is not readily available in the affected area. Bottled water to maintain hydration Shelters Perhaps extra clothes Toilets (chemical or other) Full body wipes

29 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 29 06-1 Training Materials Hands-On: Katrina Aftermath: Response & Preparedness NEEDS OF THE REMOTE RESPONDER (RR) RENDERING LONG-DISTANCE MUTUAL AID What must be provided for the RR? –A good provision plan is for a department or support organization to be able to provide a small group of RRs with food, water, and logistical support for 72 hours.

30 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 30 Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath Response & Preparedness: Quiz Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 1. True or False: SEMA stands for State Emergency Management Association. 2. True or False: You can work around a severely damaged infrastructure. 3. True or False: Isolation may be unavoidable in a disaster.

31 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 31 Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 4. What of the following don’t belong? a. MREs b. Bottled water c. Shelters d. Chemical Toilets e. Full body wraps f. They all belong. Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath Response & Preparedness: Quiz

32 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 32 Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 5. Which order is correct? a. Mutual Aid - First Responders - FEMA - OEM - SEMA b. First Responders - Mutual Aid - SEMA - FEMA - OEM c. SEMA - OEM - First Responders - FEMA - Mutual Aid d. First Responders - Mutual Aid - OEM - SEMA - FEMA e. None of the above (Answers on Slide 35) Hurricane Katrina: The Aftermath Response & Preparedness: Quiz

33 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 33 06-1 Training Materials Evolutions 2000: Continuing Education Kramer vs. Kramer: Disaster Response - Mutual Aid Complete written responses to the following three essay questions: 1. What is your feeling regarding large-scale or long-distance mutual aid among fire departments? 2. How have recent events in America changed (or not changed) your opinion in this regard? 3. Provide a real-life example of a long-distance mutual aid response, describing any success stories or problems. If you’re enrolled in the Open Learning Fire Service Program at the University of Cincinnati, here’s your opportunity this month to earn one college credit hour for watching Working Fire Training. …CONT.

34 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 34 ENROLLMENT INFORMATION: For more information on enrolling in the Open Learning program to gain college credit, call Working Fire Training at 800-516-3473 for a brochure or, to register directly, call the University of Cincinnati at 513- 556-6583. Associates and Bachelors programs are available. Call to have your transcripts evaluated. Send your responses to: Professor Bill Kramer University of Cincinnati College of Applied Science 2220 Victory Parkway, ML #103 Cincinnati, Ohio 45206 06-1 Training Materials Evolutions 2000: Continuing Education

35 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2006 / Volume 06-1 35 06-1 Training Materials Thanks so much for viewing Working Fire Training! See you next month – stay safe! Answers: Hands-On: Hurricane Katrina: Response & Preparedness Quiz on Slides 30-32: 1. False 2. True 3. False 4. f 5. c TRAINING


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