Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Agenda. Review How did Andean societies adapt to their environments? What were the roles of the ayllu and mit’a? What are some elements of the Moche,

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Agenda. Review How did Andean societies adapt to their environments? What were the roles of the ayllu and mit’a? What are some elements of the Moche,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Agenda

2 Review How did Andean societies adapt to their environments? What were the roles of the ayllu and mit’a? What are some elements of the Moche, Tiwanaku, and Wari cultures? How did the Inca create an empire? How the Inca adapt to their environment? How did the Inca empire weaken?

3 Unit 3: Regional and Transregional Interactions (600 C.E. – 1450 C.E.)

4 ESSENTIAL LEARNING: MONGOL EURASIA AND ITS AFTERMATH( )

5 Objectives Describe Mongol society. Evaluate Mongol conquest. Describe how the Mongols won territory through superior battle tactics. Describe the role of trade routes in the spread of disease.

6 Essential Questions What was the setup of Mongol society? How did Mongol conquests proceed? How did the Mongols win territory through superior battle tactics? What was the role of trade routes in the spread of disease?

7 Map 13-1, p. 341

8 Target: The Rise of the Mongols ( ) Nomadism in Central and Inner Asia – Pastoralists – Councils ratified decisions of the khan – Slaves – Weak groups paid tribute for land and protection. – Powerful groups lived off tribute, engaged in warfare.

9 Arranged marriages. Women – power in negotiation and management Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam. Shamanism.

10 Mongol Conquests ( ) – Genghis Khan (1206) – Tanggut, Jin, Khwarezm – Ogodei Khan (1227) – Tanggut, Jin, northern China, threatened Southern Song – Batu – Kievan Russia, Moscow, Poland, Hungary. – Guyuk – Baghdad (1258) – Khubilai (1265) – family challenged. Yuan Empire (1271)

11 – Jagadai’s descendants dominated Central Asia = independent Mongol center, spread of Islam – Invaded Annam (1279) and Champa (1283) – Failed to successfully invade Java and Japan. – Extraordinary horse riders, superior bows – Flaming arrows and catapults – Resistance = annihilation

12 Overland Trade and Disease – Commercial integration – Merchants met ambassadors, scholars, and missionaries on routes to the Mongol courts. Marco Polo ( )

13 – Bubonic plague Mid-13 th century – supply trains servicing Yunnan helped spread of rats. – Typhus, influenza, and smallpox. – Combination of diseases - “great pandemic” of

14 Essential Questions What was the setup of Mongol society? How did Mongol conquests proceed? How did the Mongols win territory through superior battle tactics? What was the role of trade routes in the spread of disease?

15 Agenda

16 Review What was the setup of Mongol society? How did Mongol conquests proceed? How did the Mongols win territory through superior battle tactics? What was the role of trade routes in the spread of disease?

17 Unit 3: Regional and Transregional Interactions (600 C.E. – 1450 C.E.)

18 ESSENTIAL LEARNING: MONGOL EURASIA AND ITS AFTERMATH( )

19 Objectives Describe how Islam became a matter of rivalry in Il-khan and Golden Horde states. Describe achievements in Islamic culture and science.

20 Essential Questions How did Islam became a matter of rivalry in Il- khan and Golden Horde states? What were some achievements in Islamic culture and science?

21 Target: The Mongols and Islam ( ) Mongol rivalry – Il-khan state – Golden Horde in Russia – Islamic doctrine clashed with Mongol ways

22 – Batu’s Golden Horde successor declared himself a Muslim – Ghazan, new Il-khan ruler, declared himself a Muslim in 1295.

23 Islam and the State – Il-khan Tax farming – landowners faced debt and servitude. – Agricultural productivity declined, government took land. Paper money resulted in depression (1349 and on) Fighting among factions destabilized government

24 – Timur (Tamerlane, d. 1405) – commanded forces of Khanate of Jagadai. Delhi (1298), Ottoman Empire in Anatolia (1402). Descendants could not hold empire together.

25 Culture and Science in Islamic Eurasia – Il-khans and Timurids – blend of Iranian and Chinese cultures in Iran, Afghanistan, and Central Asia. Dominant cultural tendencies were Muslim. – Science and astronomy Math and cosmology Prediction of eclipses. Decimal notation, pi.

26 Essential Questions How did Islam became a matter of rivalry in Il- khan and Golden Horde states? What were some achievements in Islamic culture and science?

27 Agenda

28 Review How did Islam became a matter of rivalry in Il- khan and Golden Horde states? What were some achievements in Islamic culture and science?

29 Unit 3: Regional and Transregional Interactions (600 C.E. – 1450 C.E.)

30 ESSENTIAL LEARNING: MONGOL EURASIA AND ITS AFTERMATH( )

31 Objectives Assess Mongol influence on Russia. Describe why Lithuania and Serbia became independent states.

32 Essential Questions How did the Mongols influence Russia? Why were Lithuania and Serbia able to rise as independent states?

33 Target: Regional Responses in Western Eurasia Russia and Rule from Afar – Golden Horde gradually lost unity. – Rise of Russian language. – Mongols controlled gold and silver. – Rise of Novgorod and Moscow. – Destructiveness of tax collecting. – Isolated Russia from the West. – Ivan III (prince of Moscow) – autocratic ruler (late 1400s), took title tsar.

34 New States in Eastern Europe and Anatolia. – Europeans learned of passports, coal mining, movable type, high-temperature metallurgy, higher mathematics, gunpowder. – Lithuania escaped Mongol control. – Independent kingdoms in the Balkans. – Rise of Ottoman Empire.

35 Essential Questions How did the Mongols influence Russia? Why were Lithuania and Serbia able to rise as independent states?

36 Agenda

37 Review How did the Mongols influence Russia? Why were Lithuania and Serbia able to rise as independent states?

38 Unit 3: Regional and Transregional Interactions (600 C.E. – 1450 C.E.)

39 ESSENTIAL LEARNING: MONGOL EURASIA AND ITS AFTERMATH( )

40 Objectives Describe how the Mongols fostered a synthesis of Chinese and Mongol traditions. Describe the Yuan social structure. Assess the differences in city and countryside development in the Yuan empire. Identify causes for the fall of the Yuan.

41 Essential Questions How did the Mongols foster a synthesis of Chinese and Mongol traditions? What was the setup of the Yuan social structure? What were the differences in city and countryside development in the Yuan empire? What were the causes for the fall of the Yuan?

42 Target: Mongol Domination in China ( ) The Yuan Empire ( ) – Blended Mongol and Chinese traditions. – Beijing – Mongols, Central Asians and Middle Easterners, northern Chinese, southern Chinese. – Confucians lost status in government.

43 – Administration Persian, Arab, and Uighurs worked in taxation and finance. Muslim scholars – calendar-making and astronomy. Organized China into provinces.

44 – Many cities prospered. – Merchants – privileged group, many were Chinese. – Poor agricultural base.

45 Countryside – Cottage industries. – Brutal tax collection, servitude, homelessness. Warfare, infanticide, bubonic plague, refugee flight, Yellow River flooding. Fall – farmer rebellions, Zhu Yuanzhang established Ming empire. – Many Mongols stayed in China. – Still a threat in the north.

46 Essential Questions How did the Mongols foster a synthesis of Chinese and Mongol traditions? What was the setup of the Yuan social structure? What were the differences in city and countryside development in the Yuan empire? What were the causes for the fall of the Yuan?

47 Agenda

48 Review How did the Mongols foster a synthesis of Chinese and Mongol traditions? What was the setup of the Yuan social structure? What were the differences in city and countryside development in the Yuan empire? What were the causes for the fall of the Yuan?

49 Unit 3: Regional and Transregional Interactions (600 C.E. – 1450 C.E.)

50 ESSENTIAL LEARNING: MONGOL EURASIA AND ITS AFTERMATH( )

51 Objectives

52 Essential Questions

53 Target: The Early Ming Empire ( ) Ming China on a Mongol Foundation – Zhu Yuanzhang Took name Hongwu (r ). Moved capital to Nanjing. Cut ties with Central Asia and Middle East, limited imports and foreign visitors. Silver. Retained provincial structure.

54 – Emperor Yongle (r ) Returned capital to Beijing. Restored ties with Middle East. Admiral Zheng He ( ) – Cement allegiance to Ming and collect taxes. – Trade did not significantly increase.

55 Technology and population – Limited mining. – Death of Yongle – shipbuilding skills deteriorated, few advances in printing, timekeeping, and agriculture. – Reactivation of exams = less commerce. – Population growth. – Scattershot mortars, explosive canisters, cannons. – Closed ports.

56 – Achievements Literature, arts, painting. Earliest novels. Porcelain.

57 Essential Questions

58 Agenda

59 Review

60 Unit 3: Regional and Transregional Interactions (600 C.E. – 1450 C.E.)

61 ESSENTIAL LEARNING: MONGOL EURASIA AND ITS AFTERMATH( )

62 Objectives

63 Essential Questions

64 Target: Centralization and Militarism in East Asia ( ) Korea from the Mongols to the Yi ( ) – Mongols wanted coastal areas. – 1258 – Koryo king surrendered. – Learned Yuan customs. – Ended centuries of isolation. Cotton, gunpowder, calendar-making. New landed and educated class.

65 – 1392 – Yi kingdom, capital in Seoul. Mongol-style land surveys, taxation, military garrison techniques. Breakthrough in printing technology. – Expanded cultivation of cash crops (cotton). – Gained gunpowder knowledge.

66 Political Transformation in Japan ( ) – Failed 1274 Mongol invasion. Kamakura Shogunate – shogun distributed land to followers who paid tribute and gave him samurai. Shogun centralized military government, influence of warlords increased. – Mongols failed again in Wall, Japanese swords, typhoon Increased power of warrior elite, national infrastructure for trade and communication.

67 – civil war. – Ashikaga Shogunate took control at Kyoto. Growing wealth + relative peace = artistic creativity. Onin War (1477) – Fall of Yuan (1368) = resumed overseas trade.

68 The Emergence of Vietnam ( ) – Before Mongol attack in 1257, Annam and Champa had clashed frequently. Annam influenced by China, Champa influenced by the Indian Ocean. – Annam and Champa paid tribute to Mongols until fall of the Yuan (1368). Little cultural impact. Resumed warfare. Ming occupied Annam for 30 years.

69 – By 1500, Annam defeated Champa and established Vietnam. Confucian bureaucratic government and examination system. Legal code preserved village autonomy. Preserved women’s property rights.

70 Essential Questions


Download ppt "Agenda. Review How did Andean societies adapt to their environments? What were the roles of the ayllu and mit’a? What are some elements of the Moche,"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google