Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Created By Colleen Maestas-Taylor For Palmdale School District Palmdale School District Language Arts Content Standard: 7th and 8th Reading - Vocabulary.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Created By Colleen Maestas-Taylor For Palmdale School District Palmdale School District Language Arts Content Standard: 7th and 8th Reading - Vocabulary."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Created By Colleen Maestas-Taylor For Palmdale School District Palmdale School District Language Arts Content Standard: 7th and 8th Reading - Vocabulary and Concept Development 1.1

3 Figurative Language in Poetry and Prose zSimiles zMetaphors zAnalogies

4 …faces with smiles like a piano keyboard. A comparison of two seemingly unlike objects using “like” or “as.”

5 Familiar similes Peter eats like a pig My father is as strong as an ox Jane is neat as a pin Jamal is sly as a fox

6 What simile are you reminded of in this picture?

7 Does this one sound familiar? After the birth of his granddaughter, John was “proud as a peacock.”

8 A comparison of two seemingly unlike objects without a qualifying term such as “like” or “as.” “If life is a bowl of cherries, why am I always in the pits.” Erma Bombeck

9 “But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.” Who wrote these famous lines? What comparison is being made?

10 The extended use of simile or metaphor. Taking the metaphor to the next level by developing the comparison in several sentences a paragraph or throughout an entire piece of literature. No matter where John turned, the jungle closed in. The tigers were at the door, hungry for more, more, more. Each and every board meeting was another opportunity for the slithering snakes to wrap themselves around John’s body and smother the life out of him.

11 Why would I want to use a simile, metaphor, or analogy? zEnliven your writing zEconomize your use of language zExplore the use of powerful images

12  Metaphors enliven language. People get so accustomed to using the same words and phrases over and over, and always in the same ways, that they no longer know what they mean. Creative writers have the power to make the ordinary strange and the strange ordinary, making life interesting again.

13 Economy of words By writing "my dorm is a prison," you suggest to your readers that you feel as though you were placed in solitary, you are fed lousy food, you are deprived of all of life's great pleasures, your room is poorly lit and cramped-- and a hundred other things, that, if you tried to say them all, would probably take several pages.

14 Powerful Images Nobel Prize Winner Nelly Sach Sachs is famous for her use of metaphors in her poetry, here are some of her most common ones and their possible meanings: Butterflies- symbol of hope, freedom and change Metamorphoses- change during metamorphoses gives hope Stones-how the hearts of the victims have been hardened by their experiences; or the hearts and feelings of the torturers in the Holocaust. Sand -the coarseness of evil Dust-the fragileness of the human spirit (it could be blown away by a single breath)

15 More Sach (images): Knives-the razor-sharp edge that inflicts pain can cut into the human spirit causing permanent damage or death; or a wound from a knife can heal symbolizing hope. Wind-freedom; no boundaries Children-innocence Hourglass-passing time Stars-unreachable hope

16 Butterfly What lovely aftermath is painted in your dust You were lead through the flaming core of the earth through its stony shell, webs of farewell in the transcient measure. The weights of life and death sink down with your wings on the rose which withers with the light ripening homewards. What lovely aftermath is painted in your dust What royal sign in the secret of the air -Nelly Sachs

17 Do you recognize the metaphor in the following familiar sonnet? No man is an Iland, intire of it selfe; … any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankinde; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee. "Donne, John," Microsoft® Encarta® 98 Encyclopedia. © Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

18 Comparisons such as metaphors and analogies...are not only used in literature, painters often use images to convey a concept. Take a look at the following painting entitled...

19 Painter and poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti in his painting Roman de la Rose (1864, Tate Gallery, London, England) is based on the medieval poem of the same name and depicts a young poet who dreams of idealized love, symbolized by rosebuds in a garden that represents courtly life. The Rose

20 What comparisons are being made in the following?

21

22

23 There is no frigate like a book To take us lands away, Nor any coursers like a page Of prancing poetry. This traverse may the poorest take Without oppress of toll; How frugal is the chariot That bears a human soul! Now, try this one...

24 A well-written metaphor is...

25 ...A sign of genius Or so says Aristotle in Poetics:

26 He wrote... "[T]he greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor." It is "a sign of genius, since a good metaphor implies an intuitive perception of the similarity in dissimilars."

27 Are you ready to give it try?

28 Create your own metaphor

29 as verbs The news that ignited his face snuffed out her smile. as adjectives and adverbs Her carnivorous pencil carved up Susan's devotion. as prepositional phrases The doctor inspected the rash with a vulture's eye. as appositives or modifiers On the sidewalk was yesterday's paper, an ink-stained sponge. Creative ways to use metaphors

30 .

31


Download ppt "Created By Colleen Maestas-Taylor For Palmdale School District Palmdale School District Language Arts Content Standard: 7th and 8th Reading - Vocabulary."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google