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CHAPTER 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, 1600-550 B.C.E. The West Encounters and Transformations Levack/Muir/Veldman/Maas.

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Presentation on theme: "CHAPTER 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, 1600-550 B.C.E. The West Encounters and Transformations Levack/Muir/Veldman/Maas."— Presentation transcript:

1 CHAPTER 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. The West Encounters and Transformations Levack/Muir/Veldman/Maas Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007

2 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 I. The Egyptian Empire II. The Hittite, Assyrian and Babylonian Empires III. Minoans and Mycenaeans IV. The End of the International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath

3 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 Uluburun Bronze from 3200 B.C.E. tin and copper International Bronze Age, B.C.E. Spread of bronze working Four areas connected: Egypt Anatolia Mesopotamia Crete, Aegean Rise of empires

4 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 I. The Egyptian Empire Middle Kingdom, ends c B.C.E. Hyksos chariot A. New Kingdom, c B.C.E. Ahmose I ( B.C.E.) standing army borders extended Bureaucracy Upper Egypt, Thebes Lower Egypt, Memphis Vizier Temples labor force e.g. Karnak, 100,000 people Women priesthoods "Singers of Amun" Mummification

5 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 I. The Egyptian Empire B. Expansion: Canaan and Nubia "The People" Thutmose I ( B.C.E.) Palestine Thutmose III ( B.C.E.) conquers from Orontes to Euphrates Canaan, rich in natural resources Nubia (Sudan) gold c B.C.E., conquered ruled by "King's Son of Kush" colonization Diplomacy Akkadian documents from Tell-el- Amarna Cultural borrowing from Canaan Baal and Astarte into Egypt

6 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 I. The Egyptian Empire C. Pharaohs Hatshepsut ( B.C.E.) male image son of Amun-Re Thutmose III ( B.C.E.) son of Hatshepsut 13 campaigns into Canaan Megiddo, victory D. Amarna Period Amenhotep III ( B.C.E.) Aten Amenhotep IV ( B.C.E.) > Akhenaten wife, Nefertiti move to Amarna E. Kadesh and the Age of Ramesses Ramesses I Ramesses II ( B.C.E.) Muwatallis, king of Hittites Battle of Kadesh, 1274 B.C.E. stalemate, treaty

7 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 II. The Hittite, Assyrian and Babylonian Empires A. The Growth of Hittite Power by 1650 B.C.E., control Anatolia Great King God of Storms Cuneiform "Thousand Gods" B. Babylonia Kassites, from 1600 B.C.E. by 1400 B.C.E. control southern Mesopotamia c c B.C.E., single dynasty Enuma Elish Marduk Epic of Gilgamesh translated, new versions B. Assyria Ashur-Uballit (c B.C.E.) expansion diplomacy Tukulti-Ninurta ( B.C.E.)

8 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 III. Minoans and Mycenaeans A. Minoan Crete 2000 B.C.E. urbanization 2d millennium navy trading center Religion Mistress of Animals Snake Goddess Economy Palaces: Knossos, Phaistos, Mallia, Zakros Knossos 3 acres Warehouses Production controlled Linear A c B.C.E. Destructions, c B.C.E.

9 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 III. Minoans and Mycenaeans B. Mycenaean Greece, B.C.E. Definition: location and Greek culture 1400 B.C.E., height Palaces redistributive centers Linear B Greek Mycenae 30 royal burials B.C.E. Aristocracy chariots Diplomacy Hittites, Egypt Amenhotep III Succeed Crete

10 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 III. Minoans and Mycenaeans C. Two Coastal Kingdoms Ugarit 2,000 square miles 10,000 inhabitants 25,000 in hinterland Ugaritic Semitic alphabet Troy, B.C.E. Troy VI, c B.C.E. 14th-15th B.C.E., height trade with Greeks, Hittites, Cypriots c B.C.E., earthquake Troy VII ruined c B.C.E. possibly Homer's Troy

11 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 IV. The End of the International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath, B.C.E. A. The Raiders of the Land and Sea Mycenean Greece warfare palace system collapses, c B.C.E. literacy disappears Greeks migrate to Asia Minor Hittites decline, invasions by 1190 B.C.E., invasions Hattushas burned "Raiders of the Land and Sea" Egyptian documents Egypt by 1170 B.C.E., loss of Syria, Canaan period of decline Babylonia, Assyria disruption, but continuity

12 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 IV. The End of the International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath B.C.E. B. The Phoenicians Byblos, Tyre, Sidon Trade network by 950 B.C.E. Carthage by 800 B.C.E. Baalat, Baal Alphabet based on Ugaritic alphabet

13 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 IV. The End of the International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath, B.C.E. C. Assyria and Babylon, B.C.E. Neo-Assyrian Imperialism Tiglath-Pileser III ( B.C.E.) Ashurbanipal ( B.C.E.) Ninevah 500,000 by 500 B.C.E. Rebellions Nabopolassar king of Babylon

14 Chapter 2: The International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath: Trade, Empire and Diplomacy, B.C.E. Levack et al., The West: Encounters and Transformations Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Longman, Copyright 2007 IV. The End of the International Bronze Age and Its Aftermath, B.C.E. C. Assyria and Babylon, B.C.E. Neo-Babylonian Empire Nabopolassar ( B.C.E.) Nebuchadnezzar II ( B.C.E.) conquers Egypt, Syria, Phoenicia, Judah Babylon Ishtar Gate Temples to Marduk Astronomy prediction of eclipses


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