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Mathematics: Smarter Balanced Item Types and Interim Assessments Terri Sappington Coordinator, Office of Assessment and Accountability West Virginia Department.

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Presentation on theme: "Mathematics: Smarter Balanced Item Types and Interim Assessments Terri Sappington Coordinator, Office of Assessment and Accountability West Virginia Department."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mathematics: Smarter Balanced Item Types and Interim Assessments Terri Sappington Coordinator, Office of Assessment and Accountability West Virginia Department of Education

2 Questions from Last Week 1.Are 9 th, 10 th, and 11 th grade students taking the same test? No 2.Will achievement levels be set for each grade? Yes 3.How will performance task be structured? Two parts (Classroom Activity and computer-based Performance Task) 4.Scheduling assessments? Math will be three different sessions. CTCs will get information on scheduling at the next CTC meeting. 5.What baseline data will be used to measure growth? Rob Surface and Jason Perdue 6.Please provide specific terminology and resources to use to familiarize students? What skills do students need to be familiar with on the computer to perform well? Item specifications specify the terminology required. Students should take the “Training Test” on the SBAC website to become familiar with the tools.

3 7.How will Smarter Balance work in kindergarten? Please provide more information on how to prepare students. Contact: Teresa Hammond, Office of Early Education, or John Ford, Office of Secondary Learning 8.How can this test pass as fair to all students when it is computer adapted? It should more accurately reflect their abilities. What about grades 3-5 students who have an IEP that says the can use calculators? In elementary school, students are working to become mathematically fluent; use of calculators would defeat that purpose. 9.Will the testing schedules be the same across the nation? Testing windows are set for the last 80% of the instructional year. 10.Item types? Today’s webinar 11.How to access practice tests? SBAC quick links document 12.Calculator use? 3-5 no calculators, 6-11 embedded calculators for items allowing calculator use. 13.Please provide more sample questions to practice with students. Today’s webinar will show you different item types. Last week’s webinar discussed Item Specifications, the item specs contain examples of specific items used for various clusters.

4 Smarter Balanced and Evidence-Centered Design Common Core State Standards Smarter Balanced Content Specifications Smarter Balanced Item and Task Specifications Items and Performance Tasks

5 Six Item Types Selected Response Constructed Response Extended Response Performance Tasks Technology-Enabled Technology-Enhanced

6 Selected Response

7 Benefits and Limitations of Selected Response Items Benefits – Answered quickly – Assess a broad range of content in one test – Inexpensive and objectively scored – Results collected quickly Limitations – Limited ability to reveal a student’s reasoning process – Difficult to assess higher- order thinking skills

8 Selected Response Single Response – Multiple Choice

9 Selected Response Multiple Correct Options Which of the following statements is a property of a rectangle? Select all that apply. ☐ Contains three sides ☐ Contains four sides ☐ Contains eight sides ☐ Contains two sets of parallel lines ☐ Contains at least one interior angle that is acute ☐ Contains at least one interior angle that is obtuse ☐ All interior angles are right angles ☐ All sides have the same length ☐ All sides are of different length Which of the following statements is a property of a rectangle? Select all that apply. ☐ Contains three sides ☐ Contains four sides ☐ Contains eight sides ☐ Contains two sets of parallel lines ☐ Contains at least one interior angle that is acute ☐ Contains at least one interior angle that is obtuse ☐ All interior angles are right angles ☐ All sides have the same length ☐ All sides are of different length

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11 Constructed Response

12 Purpose of Constructed Response Items Constructed Response items – Address assessment targets and claims that are of greater complexity – Require more analytical thinking and reasoning

13 Administration of Constructed Response Items Administered during the computer-adaptive component Scored using artificial intelligence Most constructed response items take between 1 and 5 minutes to complete Some more complex items may take up to 10 minutes to complete

14 A teacher asked her students to use estimation to decide if the sum of the problem below is closer to 4,000 or 5, , , = One student replied that she thinks the sum is closer to 4,000. She used the estimation shown below to support her reasoning. Is the student’s reasoning correct? In the space below, use numbers and words to explain why or why not. If the student’s reasoning is not correct, explain how she should have estimated. A teacher asked her students to use estimation to decide if the sum of the problem below is closer to 4,000 or 5, , , = One student replied that she thinks the sum is closer to 4,000. She used the estimation shown below to support her reasoning. Is the student’s reasoning correct? In the space below, use numbers and words to explain why or why not. If the student’s reasoning is not correct, explain how she should have estimated. Components of a Constructed Response Item

15 Sample Top-Score Response: The student’s reasoning is incorrect. She was rounding to the thousands place. She had 2 numbers that were less than 500, and she decided to round these numbers to 0. This is like saying these numbers were not in the problem at all. She needs to account for these two numbers. Together, they have a sum that is very close to 1,000. I think adding 1, , ,000 is a better strategy. This means the sum is closer to 5,000 than to 4,000. TOP-SCORE Scoring Rubric: Responses to this item will receive 0–2 points, based on the following: 2 points: Student has thorough understanding of how to estimate and how improper estimation can lead to flawed reasoning. Student states that the student in the scenario used reasoning that is incorrect and provides reasoning that shows a better estimation strategy. 1 point: Student has partial understanding of how to estimate and how improper estimation can lead to flawed reasoning. Student states that the student in the scenario used reasoning that is incorrect, but alternate estimation strategy is also flawed. 0 points: Student has little or no understanding of how to estimate and how improper estimation can lead to flawed reasoning. Student states that the student in the scenario used reasoning that is correct. SCORING RUBRIC

16 Qualities of a Rubric Focus on the essence of the primary claim and sometimes secondary claim Address the requirements of the specific assessment targets Distinguish between different levels of understanding and/or performance Contain relevant information, details, and numbers that support different levels of competency related to the item or task

17 Essential Requirements of Selected Response and Constructed Response Items Aligned to claims and assessment targets Mathematical accuracy Clarity, readability, and accessibility Free from bias issues More complex constructed response items may include scaffolding Selected response items must have appropriate distractors

18 General Guidelines for Developing Selected Response and Constructed Response Items Each item should be written to assess a primary claim Secondary content claims are also possible

19 General Guidelines for Developing Selected Response and Constructed Response Items May include mathematical concepts detailed in the Common Core State Standards for lower grades Central focus Clearly stated to ensure that students understand the task Clearly elicit the desired evidence Appropriate grade-level difficulty, cognitive complexity, and reading level Depth of Knowledge considered Grades 3–5: items do not require a calculator

20 Constructed Response The table below shows the number of students in each third-grade class at Lincoln School. There are 105 fourth-grade students at Lincoln School. How many more fourth-grade students than third-grade students are at Lincoln School? Show or explain how you found your answer. The table below shows the number of students in each third-grade class at Lincoln School. There are 105 fourth-grade students at Lincoln School. How many more fourth-grade students than third-grade students are at Lincoln School? Show or explain how you found your answer. Students in Third-Grade ClassNumber of Students Mrs. Roy24 Mr. Grant21 Mr. Harrison22 Ms. Mack25

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25 Examples of Poorly Written Items The table below shows the weights of three vehicles. Which list shows the vehicles in order from lightest to heaviest? ☐ car, motorcycle, truck ☐ motorcycle, car, truck ☐ truck, car, motorcycle ☐ truck, motorcycle, car The table below shows the weights of three vehicles. Which list shows the vehicles in order from lightest to heaviest? ☐ car, motorcycle, truck ☐ motorcycle, car, truck ☐ truck, car, motorcycle ☐ truck, motorcycle, car VehicleWeight (in pounds) Car4,050 Motorcycle497 Truck 12,159 The table below shows the number of apples three students picked. Which list shows the number of apples picked in order from greatest to the least? ☐ 95, 107, 121 ☐ 95, 121, 107 ☐ 121, 107, 95 ☐ 121, 95, 107 The table below shows the number of apples three students picked. Which list shows the number of apples picked in order from greatest to the least? ☐ 95, 107, 121 ☐ 95, 121, 107 ☐ 121, 107, 95 ☐ 121, 95, 107 StudentNumber of Apples Bobby107 Carlos95 Jenna121

26 Examples of Poorly Written Items Mercedes received 32 pieces of candy on Halloween. She ate ¼ of the candy. How many pieces of candy did Mercedes have left? Show or explain how you found your answer.

27 Examples of Poorly Written Items Look at the rectangle below. What is the area, in square feet, of the rectangle? ☐ 3 ☐ 15 ☐ 18 ☐ 63 Look at the rectangle below. What is the area, in square feet, of the rectangle? ☐ 3 ☐ 15 ☐ 18 ☐ 63 3 feet 6 feet

28 Constructed Response Extended Response Ms. McCrary wants to make a rabbit pen in a section of her lawn. Her plan for the rabbit pen includes the following: It will be in the shape of a rectangle. It will take 24 feet of fence material to make. Each side will be longer than 1 foot. The length and width will measure whole feet. Part A Draw 3 different rectangles that can each represent Ms. McCrary’s rabbit pen. Be sure to use all 24 feet of fence material for each pen. Use the grid below. Click the places where you want the corners of your rectangle to be. Draw one rectangle at a time. If you make a mistake, click on your rectangle to delete it. Continue as many times as necessary. Use your keyboard to type the length and width of each rabbit pen you draw. Then type the area of each rabbit pen. Be sure to select the correct unit for each answer. [Students will input length, width, and area for each rabbit pen. Students will choose unit from drop down menu.] Pen 1: Length: (feet, square feet) Width: (feet, square feet) Area: (feet, square feet) Part B Ms. McCrary wants her rabbit to have more than 60 square feet of ground area inside the pen. She finds that if she uses the side of her house as one of the sides of the rabbit pen, she can make the rabbit pen larger. Draw another rectangular rabbit pen. Use all 24 feet of fencing for 3 sides of the pen. Use one side of the house for the other side of the pen. Make sure the ground area inside the pen is greater than 60 square feet. Use the grid below. Click the places where you want the corners of your rectangle to be. If you make a mistake, click on your rectangle to delete it. Pen 2: Length: (feet, square feet) Width: (feet, square feet) Area: (feet, square feet) Pen 3: Length: (feet, square feet) Width: (feet, square feet) Area: (feet, square feet) Use your keyboard to type the length and width of each rabbit pen you draw. Then type the area of each rabbit pen. Be sure to select the correct unit for each answer. Length: (feet, square feet) Width: (feet, square feet) Area: (feet, square feet)

29 Capitalize on Technology Technology-Enabled items Technology-Enhanced items

30 Technology-Enabled Items Digital Media – Video – Animation – Sound – Interactive tools Response Types – Selected – Constructed

31 Technology-Enabled Brianna is running for class president. She needs to give a speech to the 4th grade class. Listen to the draft of her speech and then answer the questions that follow. (Test-takers listen to an audio version of the following speech.) “Hi, My name is Brianna. I am running for class president, and I hope you will vote for me. You know many of my friends said they would. I am involved in many activities, including track and theater. If I am elected, I will hold several fundraisers so that all students in the 4th grade can go on a trip at the end of the year. Also, we can donate a portion of the money to a charity of our choice. If you want a class president who will work hard for you and listen to your needs, please vote for me next week!” This speech needs to be revised before the student presents it. Which sentence should be omitted to improve the speech. A. I am running for class president, and I hope you will vote for me. B. You know many of my friends said they would. C. If I am elected, I will hold several fundraisers so that all students in the 4th grade can go on a trip at the end of the year. D. If you want a class president who will work hard for you and listen to your needs, please vote for me next week!” Selected or Constructed Responses that include Multimedia

32 Example of Technology-Enabled Item Gregory is installing tile on a rectangular floor. He is using congruent square tiles that each have a side length of ½ foot The area of the floor is 22 square feet. The width of the floor is 4 feet. Use the grid and the tile below to model the floor. What is the length, in feet, of the floor? Gregory is installing tile on a rectangular floor. He is using congruent square tiles that each have a side length of ½ foot The area of the floor is 22 square feet. The width of the floor is 4 feet. Use the grid and the tile below to model the floor. What is the length, in feet, of the floor?

33 Technology-Enhanced Items Specialized interaction May have digital media for stimulus Same requirements as selected and constructed response items Students manipulate information Defined responses

34 Technology-Enhanced Items Draw a line of symmetry through the figure below. The graph on the right shows a triangle. Draw the triangle after it is reflected over the y-axis. Reorder the fractions below so that they are ordered from smallest to largest. 3/5 3/4 2/6 1/2 2/3 Classify each shape below based whether it contains at least one pair of parallel sides.

35 Comparing Technology-Enabled and Technology-Enhanced Items Draw a line of symmetry through the figure below. Gregory is installing tile on a rectangular floor. He is using congruent square tiles that each have a side length of ½ foot. The area of the floor is 22 square feet. The width of the floor is 4 feet. Use the grid and the tile below to model the floor. What is the length, in feet, of the floor? Gregory is installing tile on a rectangular floor. He is using congruent square tiles that each have a side length of ½ foot. The area of the floor is 22 square feet. The width of the floor is 4 feet. Use the grid and the tile below to model the floor. What is the length, in feet, of the floor? 5.5 feet

36 Technology-Enhanced Collects Evidence through a Non-Traditional Response

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38 The value of y is proportional the the value of x. The constant of proportionality for this relationship is 1. On the grid below, graph this proportional relationship. Technology-Enhanced Collects Evidence through a Non-Traditional Response

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48 Performance Tasks From the Smarter Balanced website (at the bottom of the Practice and Training Tests page):

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51 Performance Task

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61 Interim Assessments

62 The Smarter Balanced Interim Assessments are to be available in January.

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65 SBAC Interims Test Format Interim Comprehensive Assessments (ICAs) Same blueprints as summative Computer adaptive or fixed form Interim Assessment Blocks (IABs) Smaller than ICAs Focus on sets of targets Fixed form and can also be computer adaptive

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69 WV Printable Interim Resources

70 Balanced Assessment System Interim assessments and practice performance tasks

71 The WV Printable Interim Resources Are: Practice questions aligned to the currently used WV standards in all 4 content areas (ELA, Math, Science, and Social Studies) Assessments that could be used by teachers as bell ringers, cluster assessments, interim practice, or group activities Writing performance tasks modeled from SBAC writing performance tasks (grades 3-11) Optional interim choices for schools during the transition to SBAC interims Slide 71

72 The WV Printable Interim Resources Are NOT Not diagnostic assessments or benchmarks Not aligned to a particular or determined curriculum map; however, they do align to WV NxG clusters and standards and Smarter Balanced Claims for ELA and Math Not mandated or required Not secure test questions; however, the answer keys should be kept secure Slide 72

73 Printable Interim Resources- West Virginia Developed ELA, includes practice writing performance tasks Math, practice performance tasks under development Science Social Studies Available to educator at

74 Type in your account and password.

75 Select a folder

76 View and Print

77 Questions? Please complete the survey on this training session. Go here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VX8GGQX


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