Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

MOTORCYCLE RIDER ASSESSMENT. History Previous approaches to FoMC from NABD Previous approaches to FoMC from NABD No further developments No further developments.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "MOTORCYCLE RIDER ASSESSMENT. History Previous approaches to FoMC from NABD Previous approaches to FoMC from NABD No further developments No further developments."— Presentation transcript:

1 MOTORCYCLE RIDER ASSESSMENT

2 History Previous approaches to FoMC from NABD Previous approaches to FoMC from NABD No further developments No further developments Increased local enquiries re Axs Increased local enquiries re Axs Rural areaRural area Poor public transport systemPoor public transport system Increase in petrol costsIncrease in petrol costs Increased running costs for carsIncreased running costs for cars Greener optionsGreener options Freedom of choiceFreedom of choice DVLA Medical Branch enquiries re assessment for licencing DVLA Medical Branch enquiries re assessment for licencing

3 Establishing Need Chicken and egg situation - Difficult to establish need until people know the service is available Chicken and egg situation - Difficult to establish need until people know the service is available Ideally, 9 – 12 month pilot required in order to collect meaningful data. Ideally, 9 – 12 month pilot required in order to collect meaningful data. Does it fit with DfT objectives? Does it fit with DfT objectives?

4 Who would the assessments be for ? Initially it was thought for any biker with disabilities, but: Initially it was thought for any biker with disabilities, but: NABD are good at what they do ie adaptations to bikes.NABD are good at what they do ie adaptations to bikes. Huge set up costsHuge set up costs No assessment was available of “fitness to ride”No assessment was available of “fitness to ride”

5 Initial Proposal Carry out whole assessment Carry out whole assessment 1 st part similar to car driver assessment1 st part similar to car driver assessment 2 nd part on off-road area2 nd part on off-road area 3 rd part on road3 rd part on road Types of assessment to be provided: Types of assessment to be provided: Fitness to ride (cognitive issues; physical disabilities)Fitness to ride (cognitive issues; physical disabilities) Adaptations requirementsAdaptations requirements Ability to learnAbility to learn

6 This was soon deemed to be impractical because: This was soon deemed to be impractical because: Suitable location required, including a large, flat riding areaSuitable location required, including a large, flat riding area Appropriately qualified and experienced motorcycle instructor/assessor requiredAppropriately qualified and experienced motorcycle instructor/assessor required Suitable machines required – greater variety than cars due to complex licencing laws.Suitable machines required – greater variety than cars due to complex licencing laws. Large selection of clothing and protective equipment required – all expensive.Large selection of clothing and protective equipment required – all expensive.

7 Re-Think………… Q.What are we good at? A. Assessment, problem solving and teamwork.

8 Feasibility of using existing rider training establishments explored. Already approved by DSA Already approved by DSA Entire infrastructure already in place Entire infrastructure already in place Mobility Centre could make use of instructors, bikes, clothing, protective equipment, approved training areas on ‘as & when’ basis Mobility Centre could make use of instructors, bikes, clothing, protective equipment, approved training areas on ‘as & when’ basis Insurance covered Insurance covered

9 2 nd Proposal 1 st part Ax in similar format to car drivers’ assessment, carried out by clinician. 1 st part Ax in similar format to car drivers’ assessment, carried out by clinician. 2 nd part Ax to be practical, carried out off-road, at the rider training base. 2 nd part Ax to be practical, carried out off-road, at the rider training base. 3 rd part Ax to be practical on-road, accompanied by the instructor and our assessor, both on m/bikes. 3 rd part Ax to be practical on-road, accompanied by the instructor and our assessor, both on m/bikes.

10 Assessment Format Part 1 Part 1 Physical abilityPhysical ability Effect of Medical conditionEffect of Medical condition ROM, Strength, tone etcROM, Strength, tone etc Cognitive abilityCognitive ability

11 Part 2 – carried out on off-road, flat, riding area Part 2 – carried out on off-road, flat, riding area Use of controlsUse of controls Balance, riding in pre-determined patternsBalance, riding in pre-determined patterns Normal braking, emergency brakingNormal braking, emergency braking Slow ridingSlow riding Knowledge of highway codeKnowledge of highway code Knowledge of protective equipment requirementsKnowledge of protective equipment requirements Awareness of dangers and hazardsAwareness of dangers and hazards

12

13 The client will only move on to the next part of the assessment if : The client will only move on to the next part of the assessment if : 1. they can demonstrate an acceptable level of vehicle control, and 2. it is considered they are safe to do so. In cases where clients are attending to determine their potential to learn (eg learning difficulties, head injuries etc) the next stage would not be undertaken but they may be referred on for Compulsory Basic Training as per the standard requirements for all motorcyclists. In cases where clients are attending to determine their potential to learn (eg learning difficulties, head injuries etc) the next stage would not be undertaken but they may be referred on for Compulsory Basic Training as per the standard requirements for all motorcyclists.

14 Part 3 – carried out on-road Client riding appropriate machine, Client riding appropriate machine, Instructor and Assessor following, Instructor and Assessor following, Route to be agreed between Mobility Centre and Instructor Route to be agreed between Mobility Centre and Instructor One hour on road One hour on road Debrief Debrief

15

16

17 Next Steps Further investigation into motorbike adaptations Further investigation into motorbike adaptations Approach NABD again; are they open to referrals from us once “fitness to ride” issues have been covered? Approach NABD again; are they open to referrals from us once “fitness to ride” issues have been covered? Establish a working group of interested centres within Forum who have staff and facilities available. Establish a working group of interested centres within Forum who have staff and facilities available. Gain approval from DfT Gain approval from DfT

18 CASE STUDY

19 Motorcycle Assessment – Vehicle Handling Assessment Confidential Name: Ash Name: Ash Address:XxxxxxxXxxxxxxx Address:XxxxxxxXxxxxxxx Postcode:xxxxxx Postcode:xxxxxx Telephone: Address Telephone: Address Date of Birth: Date of Birth: DVLA ref Number DVLA ref Number KMAC ref No:xxxx TMA KMAC ref No:xxxx TMA Diagnosis: Learning difficulties; injured right shoulder Diagnosis: Learning difficulties; injured right shoulder Date of Onset: 2005, following accident Date of Onset: 2005, following accident Referring Agency: Self Referring Agency: Self Assessors: IC (OT) & RW (ADI) Assessors: IC (OT) & RW (ADI) Persons Present:Mother Persons Present:Mother Date of Assessment: Date of Assessment: Date of report: Date of report:

20 Medical History Ash has a history of learning difficulties and depression. In 2005 he was involved in a road accident when he was hit by an oncoming car, as a result of which he sustained multiple injuries. He still has an intramedullary nail in situ and a metal plate in his wrist. His right shoulder joint was injured and has resulted in reduced range of movement with loss of sensation and loss of deltoid muscle bulk. Ash’s current medication includes: Risperidone and paracetamol. Ash has a history of learning difficulties and depression. In 2005 he was involved in a road accident when he was hit by an oncoming car, as a result of which he sustained multiple injuries. He still has an intramedullary nail in situ and a metal plate in his wrist. His right shoulder joint was injured and has resulted in reduced range of movement with loss of sensation and loss of deltoid muscle bulk. Ash’s current medication includes: Risperidone and paracetamol.

21 Date of Onset: 2005, following accident Social Situation: Ash recently started living on his own in a flat. He receives assistance from his mother but is having some difficulties looking after himself ie cooking and cleaning. Driving Experience: He has a provisional licence and has completed CBT twice – it is now expired. He reported having an assessment previously (supplier not known but referred by GP). This was an ‘on-road’ assessment with the assessor (who walked with a stick) following Ash on his motorbike in a car. It was not concluded and no report was provided.

22 Physical Range of Movement and Strength Head and Neck Full TrunkFull Upper LimbsReduced right shoulder Lower LimbsFull Balance Good Vision:Able to read number plate at 20.5 metres; Peripheral vision adequate Cognitive Assessment Ash undertook a number of cognitive tests designed to demonstrate his processing ability. Ash undertook a number of cognitive tests designed to demonstrate his processing ability. Short term memoryvery good Acoustic reaction test 0.55 secs (Acceptable range= 0.4 – 1 sec) Visual reaction test0.66 secs (Acceptable range= 0.4 – 1 sec) 27 lamp reaction test Average 0.55 secs (Acceptable range= 0.4 – 1 sec)

23 Off Road Circuit Assessment Motorcycles used:Honda MT50 (50cc) with 5 gears Starting method:Kick start Basic maintenance/service questions (a per DSA riding test)Not assessed Basic highway code awareness Not assessed Awareness of dangers of motorcycles v other traffic Not assessed

24 Awareness of protective clothing requirements: Able to state basic requirements came equipped with full protective clothing of medium to high quality which appeared to have been well cared for. Awareness of static hazards: Aware of consequences of wet roads

25 Taking off/putting on stand: Independent Starting: Independent Moving off/stopping: Independent Balance at walking pace: Not assessed Balance at normal driving speed: Good Use of gears:Good – no instruction necessary Use of brakesGood – no instruction necessary Use of throttleGood – no instruction necessary Use of indicators when moving: Not assessed Use of lights when moving: Not assessed

26 Steering control round circuit No instruction necessary Steering control round cones Good – well controlled and balance maintained without putting feet down Controlled brakingGood Emergency stopsNot assessed On Road Assessment Not undertaken

27 Recommendations/ Summary Recommendations/ Summary Ash showed good overall control of the motorcycle in all the exercises asked of him. These were deliberately designed to test his balance and steering control in a variety of situations; including following a course clockwise and anti-clockwise; changing gear, controlled braking; figure of eight pattern around cones; weaving in between a series of cones; controlled braking using both brakes and changing gear at the same time; use of throttle. Based on the skills shown during the off road section, there would appear to be no reason why he should not undertake a CBT course – the passing of which would enable him to ride on the road unsupervised for a maximum of two years. There would appear to be no reason why he should not be able to train for and pass his test within that time. Ash showed good overall control of the motorcycle in all the exercises asked of him. These were deliberately designed to test his balance and steering control in a variety of situations; including following a course clockwise and anti-clockwise; changing gear, controlled braking; figure of eight pattern around cones; weaving in between a series of cones; controlled braking using both brakes and changing gear at the same time; use of throttle. Based on the skills shown during the off road section, there would appear to be no reason why he should not undertake a CBT course – the passing of which would enable him to ride on the road unsupervised for a maximum of two years. There would appear to be no reason why he should not be able to train for and pass his test within that time.

28 Update – Ash has now completed CBT with Norfolk Rider Training Ash has now completed CBT with Norfolk Rider Training His mother has bought him a “very nice” bike which he adores and treats with the greatest respect. His mother has bought him a “very nice” bike which he adores and treats with the greatest respect. He is back at work. He is back at work. His depression has lifted and according to his family he is a different person. His depression has lifted and according to his family he is a different person.


Download ppt "MOTORCYCLE RIDER ASSESSMENT. History Previous approaches to FoMC from NABD Previous approaches to FoMC from NABD No further developments No further developments."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google