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Women In the Armed Forces Group: Quick Lime James Hunter Paul Jessen Anthony Makkar Narek Ohanyan Taylor Mesko Merari Zarceno.

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Presentation on theme: "Women In the Armed Forces Group: Quick Lime James Hunter Paul Jessen Anthony Makkar Narek Ohanyan Taylor Mesko Merari Zarceno."— Presentation transcript:

1 Women In the Armed Forces Group: Quick Lime James Hunter Paul Jessen Anthony Makkar Narek Ohanyan Taylor Mesko Merari Zarceno

2 Overview of Women in the Armed Forces…  Women have served in the United States Army since  Nursed the ill and wounded, laundered and mended clothing, and cooked for the troops in camp on campaign; James Hunter Group: Quicklime

3  Physical  Biological make up (Less dense)  45-50% less upper body strength than men  25-30% less aerobic ability than men  Data from Center for Military Readiness  Physiological  Romance  Influence on Men (IDF – Israel defense force)  Tactical  IDF reported enemy wouldn’t surrender to women  Casualty vs. Intelligence  Other  Commander Kathleen McGrath  Army Culture changed  Quote: Army Captain  “People used to stay because they felt like warriors, making a difference, with commanders they respected, in units they were proud of. Those feelings today don’t exist.” James Hunter Overview of Women in the Armed Forces…Conflicts Group: Quicklime

4  14% of todays military are Women  90% of Military's branch's have women involved  21% of men in the military have college experience  27% of women in the military have college experience  February 1946, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower prepared legislation to make the Women’s Army Corps a permanent part of the Army.  June 12, 1948 the bill was renamed to the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act.  Bill was signed into law by President Truman.  Specialty training Taylor Mesko Overview of Women in the Armed Forces… Group: Quicklime

5 Paul Jessen Women in the Navy, Joy Bright Hancock  1918, Joy Bright Hancock joined navy as yeoman (F), 1st class: courier at Camden shipyard  most yeoman were clerical workers  no women officers; could not pursue a military career in navy  1923, Obtained a private pilot's license after transferring to Naval Air Station at Cape May  one of only a few women at that time with pilot’s license  learned to assemble and disassemble plane engines  wrote or edited aviation articles for magazines  1930, Rejoined the U.S. Navy Bureau of Aeronautics  for over a decade and into WWII was responsible for the public affairs activities of The Bureau of Aeronautics as civilian head of the General Information Section Hancock (achieved rank of Commander by the end of the War )  1938, Wrote her first book: Airplanes in Action  1942, Congress authorized the Women’s Reserve of the U.S. Naval Reserve  women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service a.k.a. the WAVES  primary function: take over shore jobs, freeing men to fight”  1942, Hancock commissioned Lieutenant in the new Women's Reserve (WAVES)  highest-ranking woman at The Bureau of Aeronautics  “Her own administrative, aviation, and mechanical abilities convinced her that properly trained women could undertake almost anything”  persuaded Bureau of Aeronautics, to allow women to take specialist training (all-male aviation schools)

6  “Hancock opened the way for coeducational training in the Bureau of Aeronautics”  1944, Hancock examined the logistics of sending WAVES overseas  Women could free more men for front-line duty,  “many overseas assignments would not expose women to the hazards of combat or require the navy to construct new facilities”  1946, Assistant Director (Plans) of the Women's Reserve, promoted to WAVES Director with the rank of Captain same year  Role of women in Navy subsequently evolved  peacetime utilization: Hospital Corps, routine communications, teaching, and tasks involving manual dexterity  enlisted women attend basic training followed by “all specialists’ schools”  1947, Hancock took the lead in building an effective lobbying effort to allow women permanent standing in Navy  1948, Congress passed the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act  allowed women permanent standing in the regular or reserve service  Hancock provided testimony before Congress  1953, Retired as WAVES director  when she began her career with the Navy women could not pursue a military career  35 years later, she retired at the level of Captain  receiving the Legion of Merit “for her years of service” Women in the Navy, Joy Bright Hancock Paul Jessen

7 Women in the Coast Guard Sandra L. Stosz  1982 graduate of the United States Coast Guard Academy United States Coast Guard Academy  First female to:  Be a commander of the US Coast Guard Academy  Lead a United States Military Service Academy  Graduate the academy and be chosen for the rank “Rear Admiral”  Manage United States Coast Guard Cutter at Katmai BayUnited States Coast Guard Cutter Narek Ohanyan Group: Quicklime

8  She managed training center “Cape May”  2001-Present Sandra is Coast Guard Headquarters Director of Reserve and Leadership in Washington D.C.  Managed 7600 Coast Guard reservists of the in 2010 and increased that number to 8100 by  She was in charge of the 140 foot cutter that breaks ice for the ships navigating through the St. Mary's River in the Great Lakes.  Her and her crew were involved in 14 Coast Guard’s missions each lasting about 18 months and involved preventing many of the illegal drug trades and search and rescue projects. Women in the Coast Guard Sandra L. Stosz Narek Ohanyan Group: Quicklime

9 DOD – Department of Defense  Flournoy honored with Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service in 1996, Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service in 1998 & Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff’s Joint Distinguished Civilian Service Award in  Michele Flournoy: highest-ranking woman in history of DOD  Has been working through 2 presidencies (Bush/Obama)  Congressional resolution March 3 rd, 2011 (honored women in armed forces) Anthony Makkar Group: Quicklime

10  Overlooked nearly 7 critical issues in relation to other Policy offices in the OSD: Strategy, Requirements, Plans and Counter proliferation ; along international work in Russia, Ukraine and Eurasian affairs.  After November 2008 presidential election, became chosen as one of the DOD Review Team Leads for the Obama administration (then promoted).  Ultimately lead to peak success to be named as the “highest ranking woman” in the DOD. DOD – Department of Defense Anthony Makkar Group: Quicklime

11  Women are a great asset to the military as managerial roles as demonstrated by the 3 women previously discussed  Legislation diminishing legal barriers has allowed women to increase their influence in armed forces  Participation of women in direct combat remains controversial  Advancement of women to higher ranks in the military has brought fresh perspectives to managerial roles.  Specialty training: (ELABORATE!!!!) Merari Zarceno Conclusion: Group: Quicklime

12 References…           Group: Quicklime


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