Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

State Instructors John Gardner Mike Briski

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "State Instructors John Gardner Mike Briski"— Presentation transcript:

1 State Instructors John Gardner Mike Briski
4-H Pistol Course State Instructors John Gardner Mike Briski

2 Introduction to the Pistol
Objectives Understand the fundamentals of safety Recognize and identify parts of pistols and their function Understand proper sight alignment Understand proper trigger control Understand range commands Understand basic shooting procedures Have FUN while learning

3 Introduction Facility and Rules Food and Drink Time Schedule
Discipline and Courtesy Safety Eye Protection Ear Protection Common Sense Responsibility Range Etiquette Firing Line

4 What are some Basic Safety Rules??
Muzzle Control Action Open Trigger Finger off Eyes and Ears What are some Basic Safety Rules??

5 Semi-automatic Pistol Knowledge
Semi-automatic pistol (def) Fires a single cartridge each time the trigger is pulled Automatically extracts and ejects the empty case Inserts a new cartridge into the chamber

6 Revolver Knowledge Revolver (def)
A revolver is a pistol that has a rotating cylinder containing a number of firing chambers. The action of the trigger or hammer will line up the chamber with the barrel and firing pin.

7 Handgun Knowledge Barrel Revolvers and Semi-Automatics consists of three major components Frame or Stock Barrel Action Action Frame Barrel

8 Air Pistols Operating Parts of Pistol Bolt or Breechblock
Holds Projectile in Place May Cock Action Ejects Spent Cartridge

9 Semi-automatic Pistol Knowledge
Parts Grip Panels Trigger Rear Sight Slide Stop Front Sight Slide Stop Front Sight Rear Sight Trigger Grip Panels

10 Handgun Knowledge Action (def) Working Parts of Pistol Trigger Hammer
Releases Mechanical Parts of Action Causing Pistol to Fire Firing Pin or Hammer Air Charge May Cock Action in Some Pistols Hammer Some semi-automatics are hammerless Trigger

11 Handgun Knowledge Grip Panels Wood, Plastic, Rubber
Rear Sight Grip Panels Wood, Plastic, Rubber Attached to lower portion of the frame Trigger Guard Protects the trigger to prevent accidental firing Rear Sight Front Sight Trigger Releases mechanical parts to cause firing Trigger Trigger Guard Grip Panels Front Sight

12 Semi-automatic Pistol Knowledge
Safety Mechanical device designed to reduce the chance of accidental discharge Mechanical devices can fail Safety

13 Safety Mechanism Mechanical Device to Block Operation of Action
Trigger Only Firing Pin Block Hammer Blocks Potential for Failure Shooter Ultimately Responsible for Safety Muzzle Pointed in Safe Direction Personally Check Safety of Any Shot Before Firing Kept in the “ON” position till ready to fire

14 Handgun Knowledge Barrel Chamber
Unlike revolvers, semi-automatic pistols have a single chamber located at the rear of the barrel Holds cartridge at the instant of firing The revolver, in contrast, has multiple chambers which are located in the cylinder Cylinder

15 Handgun Knowledge Barrel (def) Metal tube through which bullet passes
Launches the projectile Bore - Inside of Barrel Bore

16 Muzzle Where the Projectile Exits Points Toward Impact Site

17 Rifling Spiral Lands (Ridges) and Grooves
Rotating Projectile on Its Long Axis Stabilizing Flight Path

18 Types of Sights Partridge Sights Electronic Sights Telescopic Sights
Laser Sights

19 Types of Open Sights A) U-notch and post B) Patridge
C) V-notch and post D) express E) U-notch and bead F) V-notch and bead G) trapezoid H) ghost ring. The gray dot represents the target.

20 Eye Dominance

21 Determining the Dominant Eye
Each individual has a dominant eye, which should be used to aim the pistol. Reduced Eye Fatigue Reduced Tension Quicker Target Acquisition Both Eyes Open Better Depth Perception

22 Sight Alignment Sights As Reference Points
Aligning the Eye With the Bore Aligning the Bore With the Intended Point of Impact 

23 Achieving Sight Alignment
Focus on Front Sight Center Front Sight in Rear Sight Notch Align Top of Front Sight Maintain Front Sight Focus

24 Trigger Control What is the function of the trigger?
When pressed, the trigger activates the hammer and fires the gun. The index finger is placed with the trigger halfway between the tip of the finger and the first joint.

25 Trigger Control The trigger is pressed in a smooth, continuous manner directly to the rear, while not disturbing sight alignment.

26 Follow Through The act of Maintaining the proper sight picture and sight alignment after you fire Watch for the “LOOK SEE” student

27 Introduction to Shooting Range
Basic Range Procedures Range Officer in Charge at All Times In Charge of Calling commands, Safety, and enforcement of rules. Safety First Personal Responsibility Eye and Ear Protection Hearing Loss is non reversible Possible with any powder burning firearm. No Nonsense, Disruptive or Abusive Behavior on or Near the Range Any Special Circumstances RANGE

28 Basics of Pistol Safety on the Range
Muzzles Pointed Down Range Actions Open and Empty Except When Firing Finger off the Trigger Except When Firing Eyes and Ears on the range

29 Procedure If a Problem Occurs
Cease Fire If Necessary Keep Pistol Pointed Down Range Raise Hand for Help

30 Range Commands Shooters to the Line
Is the Line Ready? Respond by Firing Point Number The Line Is Ready Pick up Your Pistols (or Make Ready) Fire When Ready Cease Fire Make Your Pistols Safe Ground Your Pistols

31 Cease Fire!! Immediate Response Necessary Finger off Trigger
Make Pistol Safe Open Action Remove All Ammunition Called by anyone Repeated if heard

32 Basic Pistol Shooting Procedure
Pick up your Pistol Muzzle Remains Pointed Down Range Shooter Responsibility Coach Reinforcement Safety on Location of Safety Explain “Safe” or “On” Explain “Fire” or “Off” Action Open Finger off Trigger

33 Loading or Unloading Firearm
Loading Process Open Chamber Place Projectile in Chamber Close Action Reverse Process to Unload Control of Ammunition Ensure Correct Caliber All Live Ammunition Under Control Coach or Instructor Distributes Ammunition Charging Air Pistols Use of Dummy Ammunition

34 Basic Shooting Procedure
Assume Position Take the proper grip Arms are extended Rest Muzzle on bench or table Safety Off Sight Alignment Raise Pistol Pistol and arms lift as a unit Fire When Ready Maintain Sight Alignment Trigger Press Follow Through

35 Basic Shooting Procedure
Make the Pistol Safe Open the Action Remove all ammunition

36 Ground Pistol Pistol on Bench Action Open and Exposed CBI

37 “Coaches” and Range Assistants
Watch Form and Safety Muzzle Control Focus on Front Sight Trigger Control Follow Through

38 Lesson 1 Summary Facilities Safety Pistol Parts and Function Sight Alignment Trigger Control Range Procedures Eye and Ear Protection

39 Dry Firing and Live Firing on Target Backs
Objectives Understand and practice dry firing Understand and practice live firing Understand and practice proper stance and grip Practice safe range and shooting procedures Have FUN while learning

40 Review of Previous Lesson
Facilities Basic Rules of Pistol Safety Pistol Parts and Function Sight Alignment Trigger Control Range Commands Eye and Ear Protection Shooting Procedures

41 Safety is always the primary concern when handling firearms.
Pistol Ownership What is the most important aspect of handling firearms? Safety!!! Safety is always the primary concern when handling firearms.

42 Safe Gun Handling What do you think are the major causes of gun accidents? IGNORANCE CARELESSNESS

43 #1: ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction
What do you think is meant by a “safe direction”? Term: safe direction Term: muzzle If the gun were to discharge, it would not cause injury or damage.

44 #2: ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot
If your finger is kept off the trigger, where should it be? Term: trigger Term: trigger guard Term: frame The finger should rest outside the trigger guard or along the side of the gun (on the frame).

45 #3: Always keep the gun unloaded until ready to use
How do you know whether or not a gun is unloaded? Term: magazine Term: action Term: chamber Check that a gun is unloaded by removing the magazine, opening the action, and inspecting the chamber.

46 Safe Gun Handling An agent with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency has been suspended after video surfaced showing the man shooting himself during a gun safety class in front of a group of Orlando fourth-graders.

47 Shooting Positions Supported Seated Seated at Bench
Pistol Supported on Rest Grip Resting on Table

48 Stance for Two-handed Standing Position
Standing Facing Target Feet Shoulder-width Apart Nearly Touching Shooting Bench or Table At Least 1 M (3 Feet) Apart

49 Two-handed Grip Thumb-lock Grip
Heel of Grip Placed in Web of Shooting Hand Thumb Along Side of Grip Fingers Around Grip Trigger Finger Along Trigger Guard Bracing or Supporting Hand Fingers on Fingers Thumb on Thumb Grip Consistent, Firm but Relaxed Arms Evenly Extended Elbows Rotated Down Relaxed Arms Shoulder High

50 Palm-rest Grip Shooting Hand As Above
Supporting Hand Cupped Under Base of Grip and Fingers Arm of Shooting Hand Pushing Forward Slightly Arm of Cupped Hand Slightly Bent and Pulling Back Slightly

51 Dry Firing Going Through the Shooting Sequence Without Ammunition
Avoid Tension and Noise of Live Firing Greater Concentration on Learning How to Shoot Develop Feel for Trigger Develop Smoothness Develop Consistent Sight Alignment Use Dummy Ammunition

52 Dry Firing at Target Backs
Reasons for Using Blank Targets Less Distraction Concentration on Sight Alignment Concentration on Trigger Control

53 Coaches and Range Asst. SAFETY Muzzle Control Front Sight Focus
Trigger Control Follow Through

54 Are you comfortable with what you know?
Any questions? Let’s go shoot! Are you comfortable with what you know?

55 Dry Firing by Command Assume Pistol Shooting Position
Expanded Range Commands Expanded Shooting Procedures Repeat Several Times Reverse Roles and Repeat Sequence

56 Live Firing at Target Backs
Actually Firing a Projectile Point of Impact Obvious Indicates Where Muzzle Was Pointed

57 Ammunition Being Used Type “Coaches” Control Ammunition Rim Fire
Center Fire Pellet “Coaches” Control Ammunition

58 Shooting for Groups How to Shoot Groups
Proper Sight Alignment Good Trigger Control Consistent Hold on Target Center “Coaches” and Assistants Watch Form and Safety Muzzle Control Focus on Front Sight Trigger Control Proper Loading Procedures Refer to Owner’s Manual Reinforce Safety Rules

59 Live Firing at Target Backs
Assume Proper Pistol Shooting Position Dry Fire by Command Live Fire by Command Live Fire on Shooter’s Discretion Reverse Roles and Repeat Sequence

60 Evaluating Groups Review Shooting for Groups Consistency
Sight Alignment Trigger Control Center of Mass Hold

61 Fire a Carefully Held, Five-Shot Group
Small Groups Adequate Mastery of Basics Ready to Move on to Target Faces Location Not Important

62 Large or Inconsistent Groups
Continue Using Supported Position Keep Pressure OFF Shooter by Staying With Target Backs Allow Shooters to Proceed As They Are Ready.

63 Lesson 2 and 3 Summary Sight Alignment Trigger Control
Range Safety and Procedures Dry Firing at Target Backs Live Firing at Target Backs Shooting for Groups

64 Sight Picture and Sight Adjustment for Pistols
Objectives Demonstrate and understanding of sight picture Demonstrate the ability to shoot groups using consistent and proper shooting form Demonstrate a sound two-handed shooting technique from the standing position Demonstrate and understanding of how to adjust sights to move and scoring ability using standard bulls-eye targets

65 Sight Picture and Sight Adjustment for Pistols
Objectives (con’t) Improve scoring ability using standard bulls-eye targets Have fun while learning

66 Sight Picture Sight Picture Elements of a Proper Sight Picture
Aligned Sights in Relation to a Target Elements of a Proper Sight Picture Focus on Front Sight Rear Sight and Target Slightly Out of Focus

67 Focus is on the… front sight

68 Types of Sight Pictures
Six O’clock “Pumpkin on a Post” Center of Mass Both Acceptable, but Stick With One Type

69 Are you comfortable with what you know?
Any questions? Let’s go shoot! Are you comfortable with what you know?

70 Live Firing at Target Faces
Shooting bulls-eye targets Watch for consistent groups Provide support for shooters who need it

71 Developing Consistent Sight Picture
Precise Shooting Requires Consistent Sight Alignment Alignment Errors Magnified by Distance to Target Precision Comes From Consistent Action Practice Essential for Consistency

72 Triangulation Exercise
Mount Pistol in Vise or Set in Notches in a Small Box Align Pistol With Blank Target Move Box or Vise to Position Sights Fix Box or Vise in Place Have Participant Align Sights Have Participant Direct the Marker to the Aligned Sights With Verbal Directions Mark Location Through Center of Marker Repeat at Least Three Times Size of Group Shows Precision in Sight Alignment Group Sizes of Quarter to Dime Size Adequate Large Groups Shows Inconsistent Sight Alignment Discuss and Repeat Exercise If Needed

73 Sight Adjustment Objective Is to Match Point of Aim and Point of Impact Move Sights to Align With the Bore

74 Rear Sight Adjustment Most Common
Move Rear Sight in the Direction You Want the Point of Impact to Move Use Center of Group for Reference Point Note Distance and Direction From Desired Point of Impact

75 Front Sight Adjustment
Less Commonly Needed Move Front Sight Toward the Current Point of Impact (Chase the Hits With the Sight) Adjust Sights to Place Group Center in Center of Bulls Eye

76 Are you comfortable with what you know?
Any questions? Let’s go shoot! Are you comfortable with what you know?

77 Shoot Ten Shots for Scoring

78 Scoring Scoring in Concentric Bands Highest Band Touched Is Scored
Lines Between Bands Part of Higher Scoring Area Scored From Center Out Center Is Scored As “10” Each Ring One Point Less Shots Outside Scoring Area Are Scored As “0”

79 Use of Scoring Gauge

80 Use of Scoring Gauge

81 Summary Sight Alignment and Sight Picture Sight Adjustment Scoring

82 LESSON 5

83 Pistols, Revolvers and Ammunition
Objectives Distinguish handgun ammunition and understand safety considerations for handgun ammunition Identify other types of handguns

84 Revolver Knowledge Frame Stock Holds the gun together
Contains the Grip Panels Frame

85 Revolver Knowledge Barrel (def)
Metal tube through which bullet passes. Bore Inside of Barrel Rifling (Handbook Page 2) Spiral lands and grooves cut into the bore Barrel Bore

86 Revolver Knowledge Action (def)
Group of moving parts used to load, fire and unload the pistol (Handbook Page 2) Trigger Activates the hammer when pulled Hammer Causes the firing pin to strike and fire the cartridge Hammer Trigger

87 Revolver Knowledge Hammer Ejector Rod Cylinder Trigger
Cylinder Release Latch Ejector Rod Cylinder Trigger

88 Revolver Knowledge Differences between single and double action
Single Action Trigger performs one action; Releases Hammer Hammer is manually cocked with thumb Double Action Trigger performs two actions; Cocks and releases hammer May also be fired in single action mode by cocking hammer with thumb

89 Double Action Revolvers
May be used single-action May be cocked and fired by trigger press alone Cylinder usually exposed for loading and unloading

90 Semi-automatic Pistol Knowledge
Parts Grip Panels Trigger Rear Sight Slide Stop Front Sight Slide Stop Front Sight Rear Sight Trigger Grip Panels

91 Semi-automatic Pistol Knowledge
Action Slide On some models, slide fits around the barrel On other models, located at the rear of the barrel When fired, slide moves to the rear Returns to closed position due to pressure from a slide spring

92 Semi-automatic Pistol Knowledge
Action (con’t) Magazine (Handbook Storage device that holds cartridges ready for insertion into the chamber of a semi-automatic Magazine Release Button Device that releases magazine so it can be removed from the pistol Magazine

93 Semi-automatic Pistol Knowledge
Safety Mechanical device designed to reduce the chance of accidental discharge Mechanical devices can fail Safety

94 Operating Revolvers and Semi-Automatic Pistols
Loading Procedure Load Magazine Place Magazine into the frame under the grip Cocking Procedure Pull the slide back and release

95 Bolt-Action Pistol Similar to Bolt-action Rifles Usually Single Shot
Specialized Uses Silhouette Shooting Varmint Hunting Big Game Hunting

96 Break-Action Pistols Similar to Break Action Rifles and Shotguns
Usually Single Shot Specialized Uses Silhouette Shooting Hunting Survival Arm

97 Black Powder Handguns Muzzle loading Pistols
Single Shot or Multiple Barrels Cap-and-ball Revolvers Revolver With Cylinders Loaded Like Muzzleloader Importance of Grease Sealer Over Balls

98 Center-fire Ammunition
Numerous Calibers and Chamberings Varies With Intended Use Paper Target Shooting .38 Special (.357) 9 MM 10 MM .45 ACP Silhouettes 7 MM to .44 Magnum Hunting .224 to .458 in Many Chambering Varies With Game,Distance and Regulations.

99 Ammunition

100 Air Gun Ammunition BBs “Round” Steel Projectiles .177 Caliber
Will Damage Rifled Barrels

101 Pellets Three Sizes Common Several Designs Grades and Weights
.177 Caliber 5 MM .22 Caliber Several Designs Grades and Weights Air Pistol Competitions Use Standard .177 Pellets

102 Rim Fire Ammunition .22 Caliber Most Common Components
Rimmed Case Priming Compound Powder Bullet or Shot Capsule Used in Small Bore Shooting of All Types and in Olympic Pistol Events

103 Caliber Distance between the lands inside of the barrel
Measured in hundredths of an inch or millimeters Paper Target Shooting .22 Rimfire .38 SP / .357 Mag 9mm 10mm .45 ACP Silhouettes 7mm Mag Hunting Varies with game, distance and regulations

104 Ammunition Basic Structure
Case (Rimmed or Rimless) Primer Powder Bullet (Many Different Styles and Designs)

105 Pistol Ammunition Rimfire and Center-fire cartridges Rimfire cartridge
Primer is contained in the inside rim of the case’s base Center-fire cartridge Primer is contained in a small metal cup, and is in the center of the case’s base

106 Pistol Ammunition What three items should be checked to be sure that you are using the correct ammunition for your gun? The barrel of the gun The box of ammunition The base of the cartridge

107 Potential ammunition malfunctions
Misfire Hangfire Squib Load

108 FIRING SEQUENCE Ammo Loaded into Chamber Firing Pin Strikes the Primer
Powder Is Ignited and burns Pressure from the Powder launches the bullet

109 Fitting Handguns to Your Use
Rules and Regulations Power and Regulations Handgun Design Using Available Information

110 Lesson 5 Summary Learned Basics of Range Behavior
Learned Basic Pistol Shooting Techniques Learned Variety and Uses of Handguns Rest up to You

111 LEGAL STUFF This is not an all inclusive list please check with you local jurisdiction.

112 ATF Regulations All pistol shooters under the age of 18 must have in their possession a written permission statement from their parent or guardian stating their permission to possess and fire pistols to be in compliance with BATF regulations. A simple statement, shrunken to card size with the name of the shooter, and the parent’s name and address as well as their signature and that of a witness and dates.

113 Federal Regulations § Possession or transportation of certain firearms by persons under the age of 18; penalty. It shall be unlawful for any person under 18 years of age to knowingly and intentionally possess or transport a handgun or assault firearm anywhere in the Commonwealth. For the purposes of this section, "handgun" means any pistol or revolver or other firearm originally designed, made and intended to fire single or multiple projectiles by means of an explosion of a combustible material from one or more barrels when held in one hand and "assault firearm" means any (i) semi-automatic centerfire rifle or pistol which expels single or multiple projectiles by action of an explosion of a combustible material and is equipped at the time of the offense with a magazine which will hold more than 20 rounds of ammunition or designed by the manufacturer to accommodate a silencer or equipped with a folding stock or (ii) shotgun with a magazine which will hold more than seven rounds of the longest ammunition for which it is chambered. A violation of this section shall be a Class 1 misdemeanor. This section shall not apply to: 1. Any person (i) while in his home or on his property; (ii) while in the home or on the property of his parent, grandparent, or legal guardian; or (iii) while on the property of another who has provided prior permission, and with the prior permission of his parent or legal guardian if the person has the landowner's written permission on his person while on such property; 2. Any person who, while accompanied by an adult, is at, or going to and from, a lawful shooting range or firearms educational class, provided that the weapons are unloaded while being transported; 3. Any person actually engaged in lawful hunting or going to and from a hunting area or preserve, provided that the weapons are unloaded while being transported; and 4. Any person while carrying out his duties in the Armed Forces of the United States or the National Guard of this Commonwealth or any other state.

114 Federal Regulations § Furnishing certain weapons to minors; penalty. If any person sells, barters, gives or furnishes, or causes to be sold, bartered, given or furnished, to any minor a dirk, switchblade knife or bowie knife, having good cause to believe him to be a minor, such person shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. B. If any person sells, barters, gives or furnishes, or causes to be sold, bartered, given or furnished, to any minor a handgun, having good cause to believe him to be a minor, such person shall be guilty of a Class 6 felony. This subsection shall not apply to any transfer made between family members or for the purpose of engaging in a sporting event or activity.

115 Pistol Competitions

116 PISTOL MATCH EVENTS Slow Fire Timed /Rapid Fire Camp Perry Silhouette
Air .22 Timed /Rapid Fire Camp Perry Silhouette International Competitions

117 4-H Nationals Rules and Events
All matches are “single pistol” matches. A shooter is to shoot the entire course of fire of that event with the same pistol. No pistol changes between stages. Only one pistol per shooter allowed be on the line.

118 CAMP PERRY ROUND (modified)
Target-NRA B-8 Distance-25 yards Course of Fire 10 shots each slow fire 15-timed fire and 15-rapid fire. (40 record shots) Time Limits Slow fire: 5 minutes (10 shot string) Timed fire: 20 seconds per 5 shot string Rapid fire: 10 seconds per 5 shot string

119 CAMP PERRY ROUND Shooting Position-One-handed standing
Equipment:Iron sights only. Smallbore pistol or revolver firing the .22 rimfire long rifle, long or short cartridge with a sight radius no greater than 10 inches, and a trigger pull no less than 2 pounds. (Rule 3.4-except iron sights only.) Rule book:NRA Pistol Rules CP16650 (Most Recent printing)

120 SLOW-FIRE BULLS EYE – single stage
Target-NRA B-8 Distance-25 yards Course of Fire-All slow-fire, 40 record shots at 25 yards Time Limit-10 shots per 10 minute string. Shooting Position-one hand standing.

121 SLOW-FIRE BULLS EYE Equipment-Any smallbore pistol or revolver firing the .22 rimfire long rifle, long or short cartridge with a sight radius no greater than 10 inches, equipped with any sights that do not project an image onto the target and a trigger pull no less than 2 pounds. (Rule 3.4, any sights.) Rule book: NRA Pistol Rules CP16650 (Most Recent printing)

122 SMALLBORE HUNTER PISTOL SILHOUETTE
Target: ½ scale metallic silhouettes Course of Fire: All shooting in banks of 5 targets, shooting from left to right. 10 chickens at 40 meters 10 pigs at 50 meters 10 turkeys at 75 meters 10 rams at 100 meters. 40 record shots.

123 SMALLBORE HUNTER PISTOL SILHOUETTE
Time Limit:30 second ready time and 2 minute firing time for each bank of 5 targets Equipment: Any factory available smallbore pistol weighing no more than 5.0 pounds, chambered for the .22 rimfire long rifle cartridge and having a factory standard barrel length of no more than 12 inches measured from breech face to muzzle equipped with any sights that do not project an image on the target and a safe trigger. (NRA Pistol Silhouette Rule 3.1 and 3.2)

124 SMALLBORE HUNTER PISTOL SILHOUETTE
Shooting Position: Only standing positions may be used, two-hand holds permitted but the hands and arms must be fee of the body and may not touch beyond the wrist (NRA Rule 5.8) Scoring: Targets knocked down in order are scored as hits, those not knocked down or shot out of order are scored as misses. Rule book: NRA Pistol Silhouette Rules CS16830 (most recent printing)

125 SLOW FIRE –BULLSEYE AIR
Target: NRA B-40 or B-40/4 Distance: 10 meters or 33 feet. Course of Fire: 40 shots, 10 shot strings, 5 shots per bull. Time Limit:1½ minute per record shot (15 minutes per string) 10 min preparation time, 15 min for unlimited sighting shots. Shooting Position:one-handed hold, standing

126 SLOW FIRE –BULLSEYE AIR
Equipment:any .177 caliber (4.5 mm) air pistol weighing less than 3.3 pounds with a trigger pull of at least 17.6 ounces, metallic sights only. Overall size is limited to those that will permit the pistol to be enclosed completely in a rectangular box having inside dimension of 420mm x 200mm x 50mm (approximately 16.35” x 7.87” x 1.76”). Pellets must be single loaded. Rule book: NRA International Style Pistol Rules CI16500 (Most Recent printing)

127 TIMED FIRE/RAPID FIRE COMBO
Target-NRA B-40 or B-40/4 Distance-10 meters or 33 feet Course of Fire- Total of 40 record shots. Strings of 5 shots 5 shots per bull. Time Limit Timed-fire-20 seconds per string of 5 shots. Rapid-fire-10 seconds per string of 5 shots.

128 TIMED FIRE/RAPID FIRE COMBO
Shooting Position: Two-handed unsupported. Hands and arms must be free of the body and may not touch beyond the wrists (as silhouette) or one-hand; standing Equipment:Only pistols utilizing the 12.0 gram disposable CO2 powerlets are allowed. Revolver or semi-automatic; capable of firing 5 rounds; .177 caliber (4.5mm) weighing less than 3.5 pounds with a trigger pull of at least 2.0 pounds. Any sights - that do not project an image on the target. Rule book: NRA International Style Pistol Rules CI16500 (Most recent printing)

129 AIR PISTOL SILHOUETTE Target:1/10 scale metallic silhouettes
Course of Fire: 10 chickens at 10 yards 10 pigs at 12.5 yards 10 turkeys at 15 yards 10 rams at 18 yards Banks of 5 targets and shooting from left to right on each bank of targets. Time Limit:30 seconds ready time and 2 minute firing time for each bank of 5 targets.

130 AIR PISTOL SILHOUETTE Equipment-Any air pistol caliber .22 or smaller equipped with any sights that do not project an image on the target and having a safe trigger. Shooting Position: only standing positions may be used, two-hand holds permitted but the hands and arms must be free of the body and may not touch beyond the wrists (NRA Rule 5.8). Scoring: targets knocked down in order are scored as hits, those not knocked down or shot out of order are scored as misses. Rule book: NRA Pistol Silhouette Rules CS16830 (Most recent printing)

131 Progressive Pistol The Progressive-Position Pistol (PPP) program is intended to introduce young pistol shooters to competitive pistol target shooting and give them a natural progression into the Junior Olympic pistol competitions sponsored by USA Shooting (USAS) and the conventional pistol competitions sponsored by the National Rifle Association of America (NRA).

132 Shooting Positions There are five positions authorized
Youth Basic Supported Basic Supported Advanced Supported Two-Handed One-Handed

133 Youth Basic Supported Minimum age: None,However, a club or other governing body may establish a minimum age within its jurisdiction. Maximum age: Nine. Must be seated. May use supporting material, such as boxes, duffel bags, bean bags, or sand bags, on the table or bench.

134 Youth Basic Supported Shooting arm must be fully extended, with the sights at eye level. The non-firing hand may provide support for the firing hand or the butt of the pistol. The shooter may rest any part of either or both hands and forearms and the pistol, including the barrel, on the supporting material.

135 Youth Basic Supported

136 Basic Supported Minimum age: None However, a club or other governing body may establish a minimum age within its jurisdiction. Maximum age: Twelve. Must be seated May use supporting material, such as boxes, duffel bags, bean bags, or sand bags, on the table or bench.

137 Basic Supported Shooting arm must be fully extended, with the sights at eye level. The non-firing hand may provide support for the firing hand or the butt of the pistol. The shooter may rest the butt of the pistol on the supporting material.

138 Basic Supported

139 Advanced Supported Minimum age: None However, a club or other governing body may establish a minimum age within its jurisdiction. Maximum age: Fifteen. Must be seated. The shooter may use supporting material, such as boxes, duffel bags, bean bags, or sand bags, on the table or bench.

140 Advanced Supported The competitor’s shooting arm must be fully extended, with the sights at eye level. The non-firing hand may provide support for the firing hand or the butt of the pistol. The shooter may rest his or her elbows on the supporting material.

141 Two-Handed Minimum age: Ten.
Must shoot from a standing position, with the pistol held with both hands. The pistol must be supported entirely by the strength of the shooter. No artificial support of any kind is allowed. Shooting arm must be fully extended, with the sights at eye level. Non-firing hand will be used to provide support for the firing hand. The support hand may contact any part of the shooting hand and wrist.

142 Two-Handed

143 One-Handed Minimum age: Thirteen
Must shoot from a standing position, with the pistol held with only one hand. The pistol must be supported entirely by the strength of the shooter. No artificial support of any kind is allowed. Shooting arm must be extended, with the sights at eye level. Non-firing hand and arm may not contact any part of the firing hand or arm.

144 One-Handed

145 One-Handed

146 Coaching Coaching on the line is allowed for shooters using any of the three Supported positions. The coach or assistant may also assist the shooter in setting up and clearing the firing point and loading and cocking the pistol. The coach or assistant may not offer any physical help in making the shot. The coach or assistant may not interfere with adjacent shooters.

147 Coaching For the two standing, unsupported positions, coaching is not allowed on the firing line after the beginning of the official preparation period. While on the firing line, after the beginning of the official preparation period, a competitor may speak only with a Range Officer. Permission must be requested from the nearest range officer. Once permission is granted, the shooter will make his or her pistol safe, place it on the bench or table with the muzzle pointing downrange, and retire to the rear of the firing line for the consultation

148 Target Heights Target holders on the range must facilitate the placement of the targets at the correct height. Correct target heights, when measured from the level of the firing point to the center of the target are: Seated Position Thirty-six inches (plus or minus four inches) Standing Positions Fifty-five inches (plus or minus two inches)

149 Competition Air Pistols
Tau Brno 7 Match Custom $600 - $800 Anschutz LP $ $1500 Morini Free Pistol $ $1800


Download ppt "State Instructors John Gardner Mike Briski"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google