Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Keystone Nonfiction L.N.1.3 L.N.2.1. L.N.1.3 Use appropriate strategies to comprehend literature during the reading process. L.N.1.3.1 Identify and/or.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Keystone Nonfiction L.N.1.3 L.N.2.1. L.N.1.3 Use appropriate strategies to comprehend literature during the reading process. L.N.1.3.1 Identify and/or."— Presentation transcript:

1 Keystone Nonfiction L.N.1.3 L.N.2.1

2 L.N.1.3 Use appropriate strategies to comprehend literature during the reading process. L.N Identify and/or explain stated or implied main ideas and relevant supporting details from a text. Note: Items may target specific paragraphs. According to the passage, what was Franklin’s first job upon arriving in Philadelphia? A. baker B. sailor C. printer D. teacher

3 L.N.1.3 Use appropriate strategies to comprehend literature during the reading process. L.N Summarize the key details and events of a nonfictional text, in part or as a whole. Read the incomplete summary of the passage. Apples are a commonly eaten fruit with many health benefits. Apples are good for the heart since they contain antioxidants, fiber, and flavonoids. Studies have shown that apples can provide protection against asthma. Which sentence best completes the summary? A. Cloudy apple juice is better for the body than clear apple juice. B. People should eat three medium-sized apples per week to get their key benefits. C. The apple is actually a member of the rose family. D. The apple tree originally came from Europe and Asia.

4 L.N.1.3 Use appropriate strategies to comprehend literature during the reading process. L.N Analyze the interrelationships of ideas and events in text to determine how one idea or event may interact and influence another. Based on information in the passage, how does the fiber in apples relate to improved heart health? A. Fiber can help protect the walls of blood vessels from damage. B. Fiber helps the oxygen in blood work more efficiently. C. Fiber can help keep bad cholesterol levels under control. D. Fiber helps keep blood platelets from clumping together.

5 Quiz Time 1. It was backward day at school. The students had to do things backwards. Some of them wore their t-shirt backward. They took a test before they studied the lesson! Dessert was served first instead of last at lunch. They tried to walk home backward, but they kept bumping into each other and fell down. What is the main idea in this paragraph? A) Students had a backwards day. B) Dessert is supposed to come last. C) It is hard to do things backwards. D) Students failed their test.

6 Quiz Time 2. Jon held the ball in his hands. He bounced it slowly on the ground. Once. Twice. He crouched low and then jumped. The ball flew into the air. Up, up, up it went. Then down, down, down into the basket. "Yes!" he yelled. "Nothing but the net!" What is the main idea in this passage? A) Jon makes a basket. B) How to throw a basketball. C) Jon likes basketball. D) Jon can jump high.

7 Quiz Time Someday we will all have robots that will be our personal servants. They will look and behave much like real humans. We will be able to talk to these mechanical helpers and they will be able to respond in kind! Amazingly, the robots of the future will be able to learn from experience. They will be smart, strong, and untiring workers whose only goal will be to make our lives easier. What is the main idea in this paragraph? A) Someday we will have robots that will be our personal servants. B) We will be able to talk to robots and they will be able to respond. C) Robots will look and behave much like real humans. D) Amazingly, the robots of the future will be able to learn from experience.

8 Quiz Time The frog sat on the side of the pond. He was very still. His green color made him hard to see. A bug flew near him. His tongue zipped out, and he gobbled it up. Then the frog was still again. He waited for the next bug. What is the main idea in this paragraph? A) Frogs live in ponds. B) Frogs do not move. C) Frogs eat bugs and sit on lily pads. D) Frogs are green.

9 Quiz Time Please come home soon! I miss you so much Maria. I can't sleep when you are gone. I need to hear your soft sweet voice and see your quiet brown eyes. I miss the special way you like to eat your spaghetti with your fingers. Please come home soon! What is the main idea in this paragraph? A) Maria, you need to clean your room. B) Maria, I have lost my appetite. C) Maria, I miss you. D) Maria, you have bad manners.

10 Quiz Time The first people to wear sunglasses were the Inuit (Eskimos) in North America. They needed sunglasses because the sun and the snow were too bright for their eyes. They made them out of the skin and bones of animals. What is this passage mainly about? A) Eskimos B) The History of Sunglasses C) Inuits D) Islanders

11 Quiz Time 7. Patty loves to play games. Her favorite game is Chess because it requires a great deal of thought. Patty also likes to play less demanding board games that are based mostly on luck. She prefers Monopoly because it requires luck and skill. if she's alone, Patty likes to play action videos as long as they aren't too violent. What is this paragraph mainly about? A) Patty loves to play games B) Patty loves to play monopoly the most C) Patty likes action videos as long as they aren't too violent D) Patty likes games that require luck

12 Quiz Time 8. Sonny watches too much television. A toddler shouldn't spend hours sitting in front of a television screen. Worse yet, some of his wild behavior has been inspired by those awful cartoons he watches. His parents should spend more time reading or playing games with him and pull the plug on the TV! A baby needs more attention than just keeping them occupied and quiet. What is the main idea of this paragraph? A) Watching a lot of television is bad for Sonny. B) All cartoons are bad. C) Books are good to read to a toddler. D) Watching a lot of television is good for a baby.

13 Quiz Time 9. Many people claim that they do not have time to work exercise into their daily schedules. However, exercise can be easily worked one’’s daily routine. For instance, one can do stretches while taking a shower. While standing in line at the grocery store, one can flex the abs or clench the rear. One can even do calf raises while talking on the phone. More ideas: try walking around the building during lunch breaks and always take the stairs. What is the main idea in this passage? A) Exercise can be easily worked into one’’s daily routine B) Exercise is good for you C) One can even do calf raises while talking on the phone D) Many people claim that they do not have time to work exercise into their daily schedules.

14 Quiz Time 10. There are a number of activities that can be used to enhance your emotional growth. First, you can keep a daily journal. Writing down thoughts is an effective way of achieving better self-understanding. Second, you can join a support group. Sharing experiences creates an environment that will support your efforts to grow as a more interesting person. Third, take an assertiveness training course. Last, seek counseling. What is the main idea of this paragraph? A) Writing down thoughts is an effective way of achieving better self- understanding. B) There are a number of activities that can be used to enhance your emotional growth. C) Sharing experiences creates an environment that will support your efforts to grow as a more interesting person. D) Third, take an assertiveness training course.

15 L.N.2.1 Use appropriate strategies to make and support interpretations of literature. L.N Make inferences and/or draw conclusions based on analysis of a text. Based on information in the passage, what conclusion can be made about apples? A. They should be eaten every day. B. They are usually sweet in flavor. C. They are expensive since many are grown in other countries. D. They have substances that benefit many organs of the body.

16 L.N.2.1 Use appropriate strategies to make and support interpretations of literature. L.N Cite evidence from a text to support generalizations. Which statement from the passage best supports the generalization that the sport of curling requires careful strategy? A. “The weight of a thrown rock affects the amount of curl, but a rock’s progress can be altered by judicious sweeping to polish the ice in front of it... ” B. “You have to think several rocks ahead to make sure that, at the completion of each end of 16 rocks, your rocks are closest to the button, the center of the house.” C. “The team receives one point for each of their rocks that is within the house and is closer to the center than any of the opposition’s rocks.” D. “Added complications are that there are rocks in positions that block your access to the center of the target... ”

17 Quiz time again Preview the questions Read the passage Answer the questions

18 1. What can you infer from the first paragraph? a. Mr. Reyman is a new teacher in the school. b. The kids need to practice for the school musical. c. There's an important math test coming up soon. d. Most of the kids don't understand meteorology. 2. Why might you infer that the narrator's father is bald? a. He likes to wear hats. b. He said he used to have more hair. c. The narrator said he had a shiny head. d. The hat fit the narrator. 3. What can you infer about the fraction find? a. Some kids couldn't find anything with a fraction on it. b. Raquelita found the most interesting item. c. Paco brought in his whole team. d. The Beatles record was the most interesting thing. 4. From the story, what can you infer about the narrator's family? a. They get along well together. b. They argue a lot. c. They live in a trailer. d. They don't have time to do things together.

19 My math teacher, Mr. Reyman, always comes up with really great ideas. Take for example our assignment last weekend. We thought he'd ask us to study for the upcoming test. Instead, on Friday he says, "Some of you have questioned our need to study fractions and how often people really use them in everyday life. So to answer your query, I want you to go on a fraction hunt this weekend!" Raquelita raises her hand and asks, "You mean bring in like part of a fraction, like one shoe because it's half of a whole pair?" "Or bring me," Paco laughs, "since I play baseball, I'm of a team?" "You've got it," Mr. Reyman agrees. "Actually bring things or just draw them. Your families can help. Let's see who can find the most interesting!" At dinner that night, I tell Dad and Mom about the assignment. "Sounds like fun," Mom says. "I bought new shoes today. They're size." "Great! I'm on my way!" I say as I draw a shoe with a label inside. In the kitchen, I spot measuring cups with and on them and a measuring spoon labeled. Dad brings in his toolbox and says, "Look in here. You'll find lots of fractions!" I do, wrenches labeled and ! Over the next two days, we find many other things. Dad asks, "Did you know hats come in fractional sizes?" "No, I usually see them labeled small, medium, and large!" I reply. Dad laughs and shows me his hat with a tag inside labeled. "I used to wear a," he chuckles. "My head must be getting smaller... or maybe I just had more hair then!" In the Sunday paper, I notice ads for sales, where things are or off. And Sunday night Dad shows me something special he has with a fraction written on it. "You can take this to school, but just be very careful with it," he says as he wraps it carefully in a soft cloth and puts it into a bag. "It's one of my favorites... and kind of rare." Monday everyone brings bags of stuff and lots of pictures to class. Other kids have wrenches, measuring utensils, and clothes. But no one else has the special thing my Dad gave me. "Wow!" says Mr. Reyman when I take it carefully out of the bag. "An old Beatles record!" He holds the record up for everyone to see. There, on the label, is the fraction and some letters: 33 RPM. Mr. Reyman explains that the letters stand for Revolutions Per Minute... the number of times the record spins around on a turntable each minute. He adds that today, CDs spin at between 200 and 500 RPM and produce a cleaner, clearer sound. We all agree that fractions are useful and people do use them a lot in everyday life. I wonder what fun assignment Mr. Reyman will think up next?

20 1. What can you infer from the first paragraph? a. Mr. Reyman is a new teacher in the school. b. The kids need to practice for the school musical. c. There's an important math test coming up soon. d. Most of the kids don't understand meteorology. 2. Why might you infer that the narrator's father is bald? a. He likes to wear hats. b. He said he used to have more hair. c. The narrator said he had a shiny head. d. The hat fit the narrator. 3. What can you infer about the fraction find? a. Some kids couldn't find anything with a fraction on it. b. Raquelita found the most interesting item. c. Paco brought in his whole team. d. The Beatles record was the most interesting thing. 4. From the story, what can you infer about the narrator's family? a. They get along well together. b. They argue a lot. c. They live in a trailer. d. They don't have time to do things together.

21 5. From the first paragraph, you can infer that a. you can see dinosaurs only in museums. b. all dinosaurs were very tall. c. the author doesn't like dinosaurs. d. people of all ages are interested in dinosaurs. 6. Scientists found a rare blue lizard in Colombia, so you can infer that a. the scientists were looking for missing people. b. some dinosaurs might have been blue. c. no dinosaurs had ever lived in Colombia. d. the lizards built nests near the top of a volcano. 7. Since scientists are always discovering new things about dinosaurs, you can infer that a. they still might not have found the smallest or biggest dinosaurs. b. science is no longer interested in looking for fossils. c. prehistoric people left written records with descriptions of dinosaurs. d. when scientists make inferences, they are always right. 8. What can you infer from the fact that Stegosaurus has just one row of plates? a. Stegosaurus wasn't as old as scientists thought. b. Old pictures and museum models of Stegosaurus had to be changed. c. Someone stole the other row of plates from a museum. d. Stegosaurus means "roof lizard." 9. What can you infer about lizard eggs? a. Cooler temperatures should produce more female lizards. b. Hot weather should produce female lizards. c. Cold temperatures will produce more male lizards. d. Hot weather will produce more orange lizards. 10. What can you infer about scientists? a. They never watch TV. b. All scientists study about dinosaurs. c. They don't always agree. d. They never make mistakes.

22 Ancient Animals Dinosaurs are everywhere. You see them in movies, books, museums, and TV documentaries. They show up as stuffed toys or on T-shirts. These prehistoric beasts may be extinct—no longer living—but they're definitely not forgotten! It's been a long time since dinosaurs roamed and ruled Earth. Scientists say the last ones died about 65 million years ago. We know the dinosaurs are gone, but no one knows exactly why. After all, no one was here to witness what happened! Most scientists believe dinosaurs died out after a gigantic meteorite hit Earth's surface and drastically changed the planet's climate. Birds and mammals that were protected by feathers and fur, were better able to adapt to the weather changes than cold-blooded dinosaurs. Other scientists say dinosaurs aren't extinct, they just look different! These experts believe the prehistoric beasts changed and developed into birds! Still other scientists say that Earth's warmer weather caused more male than female dinosaurs to develop. So, they say, dinosaurs died out because there were no more females to increase the population! How do scientists know what dinosaurs looked like? There were no cameras millions of years ago, so dinosaurs are the only ones who know... and they're not talking! Scientists get clues from dinosaur fossils, and infer the rest. Bones, footprints, and other remains are evidence of how big dinosaurs were and how they moved. To figure out how they looked with their skin on, scientists look at animals that live today. Because dinosaurs were lizard-like, scientists can infer that dinosaurs looked a lot like modern-day lizards. And since modern lizards are brown, gray, or green, then dinosaurs probably were, too! That's why dinosaur pictures and museum models have the same colors as today's lizard populations. Scientists are always discovering new things about dinosaurs. In recent years, fossils were found in Antarctica, proving that dinosaurs lived on every continent. Experts also figured out that Stegosaurus had only one spread-out row of plates down its back, not two individual rows. And fossils of the smallest and the largest dinosaurs have been found. What will scientists discover next?

23 5. From the first paragraph, you can infer that a. you can see dinosaurs only in museums. b. all dinosaurs were very tall. c. the author doesn't like dinosaurs. d. people of all ages are interested in dinosaurs. 6. Scientists found a rare blue lizard in Colombia, so you can infer that a. the scientists were looking for missing people. b. some dinosaurs might have been blue. c. no dinosaurs had ever lived in Colombia. d. the lizards built nests near the top of a volcano. 7. Since scientists are always discovering new things about dinosaurs, you can infer that a. they still might not have found the smallest or biggest dinosaurs. b. science is no longer interested in looking for fossils. c. prehistoric people left written records with descriptions of dinosaurs. d. when scientists make inferences, they are always right. 8. What can you infer from the fact that Stegosaurus has just one row of plates? a. Stegosaurus wasn't as old as scientists thought. b. Old pictures and museum models of Stegosaurus had to be changed. c. Someone stole the other row of plates from a museum. d. Stegosaurus means "roof lizard." 9. What can you infer about lizard eggs? a. Cooler temperatures should produce more female lizards. b. Hot weather should produce female lizards. c. Cold temperatures will produce more male lizards. d. Hot weather will produce more orange lizards. 10. What can you infer about scientists? a. They never watch TV. b. All scientists study about dinosaurs. c. They don't always agree. d. They never make mistakes.

24 Questions 11. Which can you infer about mushrooms? a. They are all poisonous. b. They grow on soil. c. They are all yellow. d. They are all toadstools. 12. After reading the article, what can you infer about blue mushrooms? a. They are extremely poisonous. b. They are always safe to eat. c. They will upset your stomach. d. I don't have enough information to infer anything. 13. Which can you infer about mushrooms? a. They are very expensive. b. They are all flat. c. People cook them. d. They only grow under the ocean.

25 Toadstool or Mushroom All toadstools are mushrooms, but not all mushrooms are toadstools! That's because toadstools are mushrooms that are either poisonous or have a bad taste. There are more than 2,000 mushroom species, and there's no simple test to tell the poisonous ones from those safe to eat! You just have to learn to recognize which is which. Most toadstools aren't deadly if eaten, but they're likely to make you very sick. For example, the Jack-o'-Lantern toadstool, whose bright orange cap glows in the dark, might give you an upset stomach or diarrhea. But some toadstools have deadly poison, and no amount of cooking can get rid of it. They damage the liver and kidneys, and unless the eater gets immediate treatment, he or she will die. That's why experts warn, never eat a mushroom you find growing anywhere unless you know it's the safe kind. Some of the loveliest toadstools are deadly. For example, the fly agaric has a bright yellow, orange, or red cap with white bumps on top. Some people cut up this deadly beauty, sprinkle it with sugar, and tempt pesky flies to drop in for a meal. If they do, they get the specialty of the house: instant death!

26 Questions 11. Which can you infer about mushrooms? a. They are all poisonous. b. They grow on soil. c. They are all yellow. d. They are all toadstools. 12. After reading the article, what can you infer about blue mushrooms? a. They are extremely poisonous. b. They are always safe to eat. c. They will upset your stomach. d. I don't have enough information to infer anything. 13. Which can you infer about mushrooms? a. They are very expensive. b. They are all flat. c. People cook them. d. They only grow under the ocean.

27 Quiz Time Answers 1.A 2.B 3.A 4.A 5.C 6.B 7.A 8.A 9.A 10.B

28 Answers 1.c 2.b 3.d 4.a 5.d 6.b 7.a 8.b 9.a 10.c 11.b 12.d 13.c


Download ppt "Keystone Nonfiction L.N.1.3 L.N.2.1. L.N.1.3 Use appropriate strategies to comprehend literature during the reading process. L.N.1.3.1 Identify and/or."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google