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South Orangetown Central School District Presenters: Ken Mitchell, Ed. D. Brian Culot, Ed.D.

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Presentation on theme: "South Orangetown Central School District Presenters: Ken Mitchell, Ed. D. Brian Culot, Ed.D."— Presentation transcript:

1 South Orangetown Central School District Presenters: Ken Mitchell, Ed. D. Brian Culot, Ed.D.

2 What is the Common Core and the rationale for its implementation? What are the promises, concerns, and questions?

3 How is the SOCSD managing the implementation of the Common Core standards? How are staff learning how to adapt curriculum and instruction to the Common Core?

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5 Building on the strength of current state standards, the Common Core State Standards are designed to be: Focused, coherent, clear and rigorous Internationally benchmarked Anchored in college and career readiness. Evidence- and research-based

6 What is the rationale for the Common Core? (and who is making it?)

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8 George W. Bush Chester Finn Barack Obama Arne Duncan Michele Rhee Bill Gates Jeb Bush Cathie Black (former NYC Chancellor) Meryl Tisch David Steiner Davis Guggenheim (Waiting for Superman) 8

9 George W. Bush Phillips Andover Chester Finn Phillips Exeter Barack Obama Punahou School Arne Duncan Univ. of Chicago Lab School Michele Rhee Maumee Valley Country Day Bill Gates Lakeside School Jeb Bush Phillips Andover Cathie Black Aquinas Dominican Meryl Tisch Ramaz School David Steiner Perse School Davis Guggenheim Sidwell Friends 9

10 a system that is absolutely ineffective in its results.” - Newspaper Editorial 1912 “A large majority of students showed they had virtually no knowledge of elementary aspects of American History. They could not identify, Lincoln, Jefferson or Roosevelt.” -New York Times survey of college freshmen

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13 A Nation at Risk (1983) 13 Arne Duncan’s “Sputnik Moment” (2009) Sputnik (1958)

14 CountryPoverty RatePISA Score United States<10%551 Finland3.4%536 Netherlands9.0%508 Belgium6.7%506 Norway3.6%503 Switzerland6.8%501 France7.3%496 Denmark2.4%495 Czech Republic7.2%478 14

15 CountryPoverty RatePISA Score United States10%-24.9%527 Canada13.6%524 New Zealand16.3%521 Japan14.3%520 Australia11.6%515 Poland14.5%500 Germany10.9%497 Ireland15.7%496 Hungary13.1%494 United Kingdom16.2%494 Portugal15.6%489 Italy15.7%486 Greece12.4%483 Austria13.3%471 15

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18 “The independence and social skills American children develop give them a huge advantage when they join the workforce. They learn to experiment, challenge norms, and take risks. They can think for themselves, and they can innovate. This is why America remains the world leader in innovation; why Chinese and Indians invest their life savings to send their children to expensive U.S. schools when they can. India and China are changing, and as the next generations of students become like American ones, they too are beginning to innovate. So far, their education systems have held them back.” Vivek Wadhwa Bloomberg Business Week January 2011

19 Where the U.S. “leads” the world 25% of U.S. children under age 6 are below the poverty level

20 Where the U.S. “leads” the world 25% of U.S. children under age 6 are below the poverty level 45% of U.S. children under age 18 in a single parent home live below the poverty level.

21 Where the U.S. “leads” the world 25% of U.S. children under age 6 are below the poverty level 45% of U.S. children under age 18 in a single parent home live below the poverty level. U.S. life expectancy and infant mortality rates at bottom of top industrialized nations.

22 Where the U.S. “leads” the world 25% of U.S. children under age 6 are below the poverty level 45% of U.S. children under age 18 in a single parent home live below the poverty level. U.S. life expectancy and infant mortality rates at bottom of top industrialized nations. U.S. ranking on the GINI coefficient – the distribution of income between the richest and poorest citizens – has the U.S. in 94 th place. (Sweden has the smallest gap. Finland is at #11. We are clustered with Cameroon, Iran, Bulgaria, Jamaica, and Cambodia. - CIA 2012)

23 #1 in nation in Intel Semi-finalists; #2 in student participation and success on AP exams; #1 in 2011 CNBC Study of education systems that support business interests; #3 – overall education in “Quality Counts” 2012 report. 23

24 STATE“Quality Counts” National Rank Child Poverty % Maryland#113% Massachusetts#214% New York#322% Virginia#414% New Jersey#614% Pennsylvania#1312% Connecticut#1513% New Hampshire#3410% Arizona#4424% Mississippi#4533% Nevada#4822% D.C.#4930% 24

25 What is the rationale for the Common Core? (and who is making it?)

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29 Concerns Questions &

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33 Focus on Education

34 Focus on Thinking Skills

35 Focus on Education Focus on Thinking Skills Skills & Curricular Integration

36 Focus on Education Focus on Thinking Skills Skills & Curricular Integration Professional Collaboration & Learning

37 Focus on Education Focus on Thinking Skills Skills & Curricular Integration Professional Collaboration & Learning Assessment Literacy & Collaboration

38 “Common Core is the marlin that’s been out to sea and we’ve been reeling it in and it’s almost here. It’s just beside the boat – it’s huge, it’s beautiful and it has a lot of power. But how we bring it on board, how we handle it, that will require incredible skill, patience, vision, and expertise. Because if we get that wrong, and the fish starts flopping around, it has the power to destroy everything.” 38

39 Questions

40 How were the CCLS evaluated for cognitive complexity to ensure that each one is developmentally appropriate?

41 “The proposed standards conflict with compelling new research in cognitive science, neuroscience, child development…” Joint Statement of Early Childhood and Education Professionals on the Common Core Standards Initiative (2012)

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43 “They ignore children’s cognitive, emotional, and social development.” Joanne Yatvin, Past-president of NCTE (2013)

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45 “It is developmentally dangerous and professionally reckless to require all students to master standards that lie outside of normal human cognitive development…” Tienken & Orlich The School Reform Landscape (2013)

46 What was the research methodology used to “internationally benchmark” the CCLS?

47 “Despite making regular requests for evidence of international benchmarking, I received no material on the academic expectations of other leading nations in math or language and literature.” Sandra Stotsky Common Core Validation Committee Member

48 Developmental Gaps

49 How is the CCLS focus on higher-order thinking aligned with the current assessments?

50 “The exams will remain predominantly multiple choice. Heavy reliance on such items continues to promote rote teaching and learning” Strauss (2013)

51 What are concerns of leading literacy experts or groups ?

52 “Changes this significant are not likely to occur successfully without equally significant investments in the knowledge and skills of educators with necessary material supports.” International Reading Association (2012)

53 “On the whole, the image of the curriculum implicit in CCSS (and explicit especially in the new documents attempting to spell out implications for instruction) is not visibly research based; it is not based on large-scale reforms that have demonstrated a method for bringing high-needs students to the levels of the Common Core. If that were the case, then the nation would be invited to observe otherwise typical high-needs schools where most of the graduates are flourishing at their colleges. The CCSS represent an important hypothesis, but the problems are far better researched than the pathway forward.” Lucy Calkins, Mary Ehrenworth, and Christopher Lehman (2012) write, “The CCSS claim to be research based, but the vast majority of the research cited supports the fact that all is not well in America’s schools.” 53

54 What educators developed the Common Core Learning Standards?

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57 How were the standards validated and what is the projected return on investment?

58 “The standards have not been validated empirically and no metric has been set to monitor the intended or unintended consequences they will have on the education system and children.” (Tienken, 2012) 58

59 “Despite all the money and effort devoted to developing the Common Core State Standards – not to mention the simmering controversy over their adoption in several states – the study foresees little to no impact on student learning.” (Loveless, 2012) 59

60 “If states and school districts feel pressured to rush out new systems, those systems could evaluate teachers unfairly and fail to help teachers improve. That would be a disaster. A flawed execution of a good idea could convince people it is a bad idea – and that could kill this push for reform.” 60

61 How were the standards aligned with local curriculum before being used to evaluate students and teachers?

62 Curricular Gaps

63 Concerns

64 “The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision-making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to measure.” 64

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66 TEST PREP & NARROWING OF THE CURRICULUM “Five years after NCLB 60% of districts reported increased instructional time for math and ELA and a 44% decrease in all other subjects.” (Center for Ed Policy 2007) 66

67 ’ ’

68 New York State Assessment Update October 2013

69 MYTHS ABOUT TESTING MYTHSSED “REALITY”FIELD REALITY “COMMON CORE ASSESSMENTS REQUIRE TEACHING TO THE TEST.” “The Department has advised districts against rote test prep practices. Rote test prep is a disservice to students and a waste of taxpayer funds. The best preparation for state assessments is a great teacher providing great instruction.” Source: EngageNY October 2013 Evidence has shown that in high-stakes test environments, teachers are often pressured to ensure that students achieve on state assessments. The new APPR has added to those pressures. Campbell’s Law

70 MYTHS ABOUT TESTING MYTHSSED “REALITY”FIELD REALITY “COMMON CORE ASSESSMENTS ARE INTENDED TO BE OVERWHELMING AND NEEDLESSLY STRESSFUL TO STUDENTS.” “When given proper messages and supports from adults, students can find learning challenges to be rewarding and engaging. In contrast, those who leave school and cannot find a good job struggle without support for the rest of their lives. State tests should be a brief moment for students to demonstrate what they know and can do as one of multiple measures that help educators improve instruction and better support their students.” Source: EngageNY October 2013 Common Core assessments are in their infancy yet they are being used to assess students and hold teachers accountable. Common Core assessments were used before there was adequate time to adapt to the new standards, modify local curriculum, and adapt instruction to the major shifts.

71 MYTHS ABOUT CURRICULUM MythsSED “Reality”Field Reality “THE STATE’S COMMON CORE CURRICULUM MODULES ARE REQUIRED.” “Implementation of standards through curriculum and instructions has always been a local district responsibility. The State’s curriculum modules are not required; rather, they are optional and supplemental and may be adopted or adapted by local school districts. If school districts elect to develop or purchase their own materials, the Tri-state rubric can be used to assist this process.” Source: EngageNY October 2013 The rushed implementation and limited resources drove many districts to rely on materials provided by the state. Some districts believed that using state materials would better align with state assessments. The state argued that they would be providing such support and have done so, albeit through a delayed delivery schedule, via work from Expeditionary Learning.

72 MYTHS ABOUT CURRICULUM MythsSED “Reality”Field Reality “THE STATE’S COMMON CORE CURRICULUM MODULES REQUIRE OR ENCOURAGE SCRIPTED LESSONS.” “The curriculum modules are optional resources, and there is no intention that educators use these modules as a “script” for delivering instruction. Rather, the modules are tools that may be integrated into an educator’s professional practice. Whether or not educators use the state’s curriculum modules, rote and scripted lessons are a disservice to students. Students need great teachers to provide great instruction.” Source: EngageNY October 2013 While they may not “require” scripted lessons, they certainly “encourage” them, especially in light of the “risk averse” culture that has been created.

73 How is the SOCSD managing the implementation of the Common Core standards? How are staff learning how to adapt curriculum and instruction to the Common Core? Discussion

74 I. Providing Students with 21st Century Skills II. Enhancing Student Literacy III. Addressing the Diverse Needs of Learners IV. Fostering a Respectful Learning Environment

75 Common Core Standards Curriculum Work in SOCSD More than 100 teachers participated in summer 2013 work Teachers incorporated components from the ELA & math modules, including assessments and resources into unit plans ELA and math units have been aligned and updated with resources, sample lessons, and student work.

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77 TZE Student Resource Site blogs.socsd.org/tzelearn

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80 Common Core StandardsBest Practice

81 Reading complex texts Independent Reading Fountas & Pinnell Assessment Leveled Literacy Intervention Wilson Reading and Just Words Common Core StandardsBest Practice

82 CCR Reading Standard 3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Informational Text Grade 3: Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. Grade 3: Describe the relationships between a series of historical events, scientific ideas of concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect. Grade 7: Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot) Grade 7: Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events). Grades 11-12: Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). Grades 11-12: Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

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84 The modules were created by Expeditionary Learning (ELA) and Common Core Inc. (Math) The average length of each grade level module is 400 to 500 pages NYSED is working on new modules for science and social studies SOME of the modules were released last summer

85 Operations and Algebraic Thinking Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction. Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction. Add and subtract within 20. Work with addition and subtraction equations. Number and Operations in Base Ten Extend the counting sequence. Understand place value. Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract Measurement and Data Measure lengths indirectly and by iterating length units.

86 Topics from Geometry justifying algebraic steps and mappings using real number properties Topics from Trig/Trig H sequences – recursive, and in particular, arithmetic and geometric sequences re-writing a quadratic equation in vertex form determining the roots of a quadratic by completing the square determining the roots of a quadratic using the quadratic formula transformations of parent graphs, in particular, quadratic, cubic, absolute value Topics from Pre-Calculus describing a function's end-behavior – using the concept of a limit to determine how a function will behave at +/- infinity; determining the interval(s) over which a function is increasing or decreasing; constructing graphs of piecewise functions; determining critical values (maximums and minimums of functions) Topics from AP Statistics skewed data versus symmetrical data and the which measure of central tendency and variability should be used with the data set; once a least-squares regression line is calculated, students will calculate residuals and construct a residual plot to determine if a linear model is the best fit

87 Common Core Standards Testing and Accountability

88 Common Core Standards Testing and Accountability Emphasis on speaking and listening skills The listening component has been eliminated from state 3-8 ELA assessments

89 Common Core StandardsTesting and Accountability College and Career Readiness The majority of students passed the NYS regents in The majority of students did not pass the Common Core aligned state 3-8 assessments in Does this mean that the majority our students are not college and career ready?

90 Common Core Standards Testing and Accountability Close reading Are text-to-self connections not important for developing fluency and comprehension skills? Student background knowledge not emphasized

91 2008 – 2009 School Year (McGraw Hill) (Scale Score of 650 or higher exceeds proficiency on all grade levels) School Year (McGraw Hill) New Cut Scores established after tests were administered School Year (McGraw Hill) Test Changed School Year (Pearson) School Year (Pearson) Common Core Aligned Assessments) Cut score set at NAEP proficiency achievement level

92 The number of objects described in which situation can be represented by 24 ÷ 4? A) There are 24 boxes with 4 pencils in each box. B) There are 24 people on a bus, and 4 people get off the bus. C) There are 24 marbles that need to be sorted into 4 equal groups. D) There are 24 books on a shelf, and 4 more books are put on the shelf.

93 Bradley saw 3 dinosaur skeletons at the museum. To measure the length of each skeleton, he counted the number of his shoe lengths from the head to the tail, as shown in the picture below. Bradley’s shoe length is 17 cm long. Which list shows the dinosaur skeletons that were more than 320 centimeters long? a) Dinosaur X and Dinosaur Y b) Dinosaur X and Dinosaur Z c) Dinosaur Y and Dinosaur Z d) Dinosaur X, Dinosaur Y, and Dinosaur Z

94 The diagram shows the size of 5 different rectangles. Which 2 figures have the same area? Show your work or explain how you got your answer. Answer __________ and __________

95 Sophia asked the students in her class to name their favorite sport. She made this list to display the results. 1 of the students named basketball 3 1 of the students named soccer 8 5 of the students named football 12 The rest of the students in the class named baseball. What fraction of the students in the class named baseball as their favorite sport? Show your work. Answer______________________

96 What’s Next?

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99 REVIEWING EACH STANDARD TO ENSURE THAT IT IS DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE; PROVIDING ADEQUATE TIME, RESOURCES, AND TRAINING TO ENABLE TEACHERS TO LEARN AND ADAPT INSTRUCTION AND CURRICULUM; STOPPING THE USE OF HIGH-STAKES COMMON CORE ASSESSMENTS BEFORE THE STANDARDS HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFULLY IMPLEMENTED INTO THE SYSTEM.

100 USING A STAGGERED EXTERNAL TESTING SCHEDULE THAT ASSESSES STUDENTS AT THE ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE, AND HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS; USING MULTIPLE SOURCES OF DATA TO DIAGNOSE, MAKE DECISIONS ABOUT SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT, AND INFLUENCE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

101 USE OF STUDENT DATA FOR HIGH STAKES DECISION- MAKING; DISTRICT FISCAL AND LOGISTICAL ABILITIES TO EQUITABLY FUND ALL OF THE REFORMS: CCLS, APPR, AND PARCC; LEGAL IMPLICATIONS AND COSTS; ASSURANCES THAT STUDENT DATA ARE PROTECTED


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