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Purpose, places and partners A new opportunity in curriculum Mick Waters Director of Curriculum 22 April 2008.

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1 Purpose, places and partners A new opportunity in curriculum Mick Waters Director of Curriculum 22 April 2008

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3 Develop a modern, world-class curriculum that will inspire and challenge all learners and prepare them for the future

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5 A Changing Society…  technology  an ageing population  the gap between rich and poor  global culture and ethnicity  sustainability  changing maturity levels in schools  expanding knowledge of learning  a changing economy

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7 The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? Assessment fit for purpose Whole curriculum dimensions Learning approaches Components Accountability measures Every Child Matters outcomes Focus for learning Curriculum aims Be healthy Stay safe Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic wellbeing Attitudes and attributes eg determined, adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising Knowledge and understanding eg big ideas that shape the world Skills eg literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal, learning and thinking skills Successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society Confident individuals who are able to lead safe, healthy and fulfilling lives The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become To make learning and teaching more effective so that learners understand quality and how to improve Embraces peer- and self- assessmen t Uses tests and tasks appropriately Links to national standards which are consistently interpreted Helps identify clear targets for improvement Gives helpful feedback for the learner and other stakeholders Maximises pupils’ progress Promotes a broad and engaging curriculum Draws on a wide range of evidence of pupils’ learning Is integral to effective teaching and learning Informs future planning and teaching Statutory expectations PSHE PW EW+FC PEMuMFL RE SCMaICTHiGeEnD & TCiA & D Physical development Personal, social and emotional development Mathematical development Knowledge and understanding of the world Communication, language and literacy Creative development 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? Attainment and improved standards Behaviour and attendance Further involvement in education, employment or training Civic participation Healthy lifestyle choices To secure Including all learners with opportunities for learner choice and personalisation Using a range of audience and purpose Matching time to learning need eg deep, immersive and regular frequent learning In tune with human development A range of approaches eg enquiry, active learning, practical and constructive Building on learning beyond the school including community and business links Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development Overarching themes that have a significance for individuals and society, and provide relevant learning contexts: Identity and cultural diversity - Healthy lifestyles – Community participation – Enterprise – Global dimension and sustainable development – Technology and the media – Creativity and critical thinking. LessonsOut of schoolExtended hoursRoutinesEventsLocationsEnvironment A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

8 A big picture of the curriculum Copies of this CD are available from Twofour Learning, Stand S36 (near the Gallery Bar upstairs)

9  from concern about subject content  to concern about the nature and impact of subjects  to a focus on effectiveness of learning  supporting schools and settings in building their curriculum  harmonising thinking and practice in learning Some issues…

10 The Aims The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become: successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve confident individuals who are able to live safe, healthy and fulfilling lives responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society

11 Coherence… for the learner Subjects Skills Personal Development

12 Cross-curriculum dimensions The cross curricular dimensions reflect the major ideas and challenges that face society and have significance for individuals. They can provide powerful unifying themes that give learning relevance and help young people make sense of the world. Identity and cultural diversity Healthy lifestyles Community participation Enterprise Sustainable futures and the global dimension Technology and the media Creativity and critical thinking

13 A new look at subjects Subjects now… linked to curriculum aims focused on the essentials explicit links to each other support broader learning

14 Subject programmes of study Rethinking subjects

15 The importance of information and communication technology The increasing use of technology in all aspects of society makes confident, creative and productive use of ICT an essential skill for life. ICT capability encompasses not only the mastery of technical skills and techniques, but also the understanding to apply these skills purposefully, safely and responsibly in learning, everyday life and employment. ICT capability is fundamental to participation and engagement in modern society.

16 A new look at subjects: ICT Capability Communication and collaboration Exploring ideas and manipulating information Impact of technology Critical evaluation Finding information Developing ideas Communicating information Evaluating Key concepts Key processes

17 Bringing it all together in a well designed curriculum A well designed curriculum… …has clear aims and purposes reflecting learners needs local priorities national priorities …is organised in a way that is likely to achieve the aims Orchestrates time, staffing, space, approaches to teaching, learning and assessment to best effect Makes links across subjects, skills and cross-curricular dimensions …is evaluated and developed in response to changing needs is self-evolving and improving 1. What are we trying to achieve? 2. How do we organise learning? 3. How well are we achieving our aims?

18 The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? Assessment fit for purpose Whole curriculum dimensions Learning approaches Components Accountability measures Every Child Matters outcomes Focus for learning Curriculum aims Be healthy Stay safe Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic wellbeing Attitudes and attributes eg determined, adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising Knowledge and understanding eg big ideas that shape the world Skills eg literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal, learning and thinking skills Successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society Confident individuals who are able to lead safe, healthy and fulfilling lives The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become To make learning and teaching more effective so that learners understand quality and how to improve Embraces peer- and self- assessmen t Uses tests and tasks appropriately Links to national standards which are consistently interpreted Helps identify clear targets for improvement Gives helpful feedback for the learner and other stakeholders Maximises pupils’ progress Promotes a broad and engaging curriculum Draws on a wide range of evidence of pupils’ learning Is integral to effective teaching and learning Informs future planning and teaching Statutory expectations PSHE PW EW+FC PEMuMFL RE SCMaICTHiGeEnD & TCiA & D Physical development Personal, social and emotional development Mathematical development Knowledge and understanding of the world Communication, language and literacy Creative development 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? Attainment and improved standards Behaviour and attendance Further involvement in education, employment or training Civic participation Healthy lifestyle choices To secure Including all learners with opportunities for learner choice and personalisation Using a range of audience and purpose Matching time to learning need eg deep, immersive and regular frequent learning In tune with human development A range of approaches eg enquiry, active learning, practical and constructive Building on learning beyond the school including community and business links Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development Overarching themes that have a significance for individuals and society, and provide relevant learning contexts: Identity and cultural diversity - Healthy lifestyles – Community participation – Enterprise – Global dimension and sustainable development – Technology and the media – Creativity and critical thinking. LessonsOut of schoolExtended hoursRoutinesEventsLocationsEnvironment A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

19 The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? Assessment fit for purpose Whole curriculum dimensions Learning approaches Components Accountability measures Every Child Matters outcomes Focus for learning Curriculum aims Be healthy Stay safe Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic wellbeing Attitudes and attributes eg determined, adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising Knowledge and understanding eg big ideas that shape the world Skills eg literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal, learning and thinking skills Successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society Confident individuals who are able to lead safe, healthy and fulfilling lives The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become To make learning and teaching more effective so that learners understand quality and how to improve Embraces peer- and self- assessmen t Uses tests and tasks appropriately Links to national standards which are consistently interpreted Helps identify clear targets for improvement Gives helpful feedback for the learner and other stakeholders Maximises pupils’ progress Promotes a broad and engaging curriculum Draws on a wide range of evidence of pupils’ learning Is integral to effective teaching and learning Informs future planning and teaching Statutory expectations PSHE PW EW+FC PEMuMFL RE SCMaICTHiGeEnD & TCiA & D Physical development Personal, social and emotional development Mathematical development Knowledge and understanding of the world Communication, language and literacy Creative development 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? Attainment and improved standards Behaviour and attendance Further involvement in education, employment or training Civic participation Healthy lifestyle choices To secure Including all learners with opportunities for learner choice and personalisation Using a range of audience and purpose Matching time to learning need eg deep, immersive and regular frequent learning In tune with human development A range of approaches eg enquiry, active learning, practical and constructive Building on learning beyond the school including community and business links Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development Overarching themes that have a significance for individuals and society, and provide relevant learning contexts: Identity and cultural diversity - Healthy lifestyles – Community participation – Enterprise – Global dimension and sustainable development – Technology and the media – Creativity and critical thinking. LessonsOut of schoolExtended hoursRoutinesEventsLocationsEnvironment A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

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22 ICT can be used to find, develop, analyse and present information, as well as to model situations and solve problems. ICT enables rapid access to ideas and experiences from a wide range of people, communities and cultures, and allows pupils to collaborate and exchange information on a wide scale. ICT acts as a powerful force for change in society and citizens should have an understanding of the social, ethical, legal and economic implications of its use, including how to use ICT safely and responsibly. Increased capability in the use of ICT supports initiative and independent learning, as pupils are able to make informed judgements about when and where to use ICT to enhance their learning and the quality of their work. The importance of information and communication technology

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25 School grounds as the workplace

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32 The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? Assessment fit for purpose Whole curriculum dimensions Learning approaches Components Accountability measures Every Child Matters outcomes Focus for learning Curriculum aims Be healthy Stay safe Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic wellbeing Attitudes and attributes eg determined, adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising Knowledge and understanding eg big ideas that shape the world Skills eg literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal, learning and thinking skills Successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society Confident individuals who are able to lead safe, healthy and fulfilling lives The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become To make learning and teaching more effective so that learners understand quality and how to improve Embraces peer- and self- assessmen t Uses tests and tasks appropriately Links to national standards which are consistently interpreted Helps identify clear targets for improvement Gives helpful feedback for the learner and other stakeholders Maximises pupils’ progress Promotes a broad and engaging curriculum Draws on a wide range of evidence of pupils’ learning Is integral to effective teaching and learning Informs future planning and teaching Statutory expectations PSHE PW EW+FC PEMuMFL RE SCMaICTHiGeEnD & TCiA & D Physical development Personal, social and emotional development Mathematical development Knowledge and understanding of the world Communication, language and literacy Creative development 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? Attainment and improved standards Behaviour and attendance Further involvement in education, employment or training Civic participation Healthy lifestyle choices To secure Including all learners with opportunities for learner choice and personalisation Using a range of audience and purpose Matching time to learning need eg deep, immersive and regular frequent learning In tune with human development A range of approaches eg enquiry, active learning, practical and constructive Building on learning beyond the school including community and business links Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development Overarching themes that have a significance for individuals and society, and provide relevant learning contexts: Identity and cultural diversity - Healthy lifestyles – Community participation – Enterprise – Global dimension and sustainable development – Technology and the media – Creativity and critical thinking. LessonsOut of schoolExtended hoursRoutinesEventsLocationsEnvironment A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

33 Teaching 5 outcomes through ICT HealthSafe Enjoy and Achieve Participate Economic stats medical data fitness apparatus future projection diet & food music ‘e’ safe netiquette respect for others CCTV tagging identity creativity experiment music video/film photography digital media presentation audience aware global communications web logs forums voting formats basic skills business application robot controls finance online customer information career opportunities

34 What are the characteristics of a good learner? creative makes connectionsquestioning communicates well confident takes risks thirst for knowledge curious generates ideas flexible perseveres listens and reflects critical self-editing skilled shaper literate willing to have a go thinks for themselves shows initiative gets on well with others makes a difference acts with integrity self-esteem ‘can do’ attitude learns from mistakes independent

35 What are the prospects for ICT?

36 antarctic explorer systems analystair traffic controller pathologist neuro-scientist automobile technician medical equipment developer logistics analyst forensic scientist surveyor demographic analyst engineer

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39 Learning about…..  engineering  stereotyping  media  the impact of technology  future careers Confident individuals, responsible citizens, successful learners

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41 ICT can be used to find, develop, analyse and present information, as well as to model situations and solve problems. ICT enables rapid access to ideas and experiences from a wide range of people, communities and cultures, and allows pupils to collaborate and exchange information on a wide scale. ICT acts as a powerful force for change in society and citizens should have an understanding of the social, ethical, legal and economic implications of its use, including how to use ICT safely and responsibly. Increased capability in the use of ICT supports initiative and independent learning, as pupils are able to make informed judgements about when and where to use ICT to enhance their learning and the quality of their work. The importance of information and communication technology

42 The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? Assessment fit for purpose Whole curriculum dimensions Learning approaches Components Accountability measures Every Child Matters outcomes Focus for learning Curriculum aims Be healthy Stay safe Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic wellbeing Attitudes and attributes eg determined, adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising Knowledge and understanding eg big ideas that shape the world Skills eg literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal, learning and thinking skills Successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society Confident individuals who are able to lead safe, healthy and fulfilling lives The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become To make learning and teaching more effective so that learners understand quality and how to improve Embraces peer- and self- assessmen t Uses tests and tasks appropriately Links to national standards which are consistently interpreted Helps identify clear targets for improvement Gives helpful feedback for the learner and other stakeholders Maximises pupils’ progress Promotes a broad and engaging curriculum Draws on a wide range of evidence of pupils’ learning Is integral to effective teaching and learning Informs future planning and teaching Statutory expectations PSHE PW EW+FC PEMuMFL RE SCMaICTHiGeEnD & TCiA & D Physical development Personal, social and emotional development Mathematical development Knowledge and understanding of the world Communication, language and literacy Creative development 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? Attainment and improved standards Behaviour and attendance Further involvement in education, employment or training Civic participation Healthy lifestyle choices To secure Including all learners with opportunities for learner choice and personalisation Using a range of audience and purpose Matching time to learning need eg deep, immersive and regular frequent learning In tune with human development A range of approaches eg enquiry, active learning, practical and constructive Building on learning beyond the school including community and business links Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development Overarching themes that have a significance for individuals and society, and provide relevant learning contexts: Identity and cultural diversity - Healthy lifestyles – Community participation – Enterprise – Global dimension and sustainable development – Technology and the media – Creativity and critical thinking. LessonsOut of schoolExtended hoursRoutinesEventsLocationsEnvironment A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

43 Perhaps you could let me know:  What you were studying  How you came to interview the astronaut  What you found out  Whether there were any logistical problems in the interview As I understand it, an astronaut from the Discovery Programme was interviewed by children about the challenge of living for a while in space

44 We researched into how we could set up a base on the moon and be self sufficient for a period of time. We looked at how to recycle our waste, how could we communicate easily with earth, how could we generate heat, how could we grow our own food using only water. We also looked at how we could keep hives of bees to provide food. We also looked at the effect of gravity and space in getting ourselves and the bees to the moon. We also searched the moon for a suitable landing place and base for our space station that was suitable to carry on communicating with earth. We wrote a letter to NASA asking for help and advice. We were very lucky that they agreed that we could interview Nicholas Patrick. He was born near to our school and travelled on one of the Discovery Missions. We spoke to NASA and ed NASA to set up a video link. It was quite a challenge because NASA is in the U.S.A. central time which is about eight hours after our time. We used our local authority's learning centre to carry out the video conferencing. We had to carry out a test run to make sure all the technology worked properly.

45 Learning about…..  science  space exploration  communication technology  future careers Confident individuals, responsible citizens, successful learners

46 Apart from learning about space, I think you probably learned much about Information Communication Technology and how video conferencing works. When people landed on the moon we only dreamed of being able to see people with whom we were speaking.

47 ICT can be used to find, develop, analyse and present information, as well as to model situations and solve problems. ICT enables rapid access to ideas and experiences from a wide range of people, communities and cultures, and allows pupils to collaborate and exchange information on a wide scale. ICT acts as a powerful force for change in society and citizens should have an understanding of the social, ethical, legal and economic implications of its use, including how to use ICT safely and responsibly. Increased capability in the use of ICT supports initiative and independent learning, as pupils are able to make informed judgements about when and where to use ICT to enhance their learning and the quality of their work. The importance of information and communication technology

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49 Civic Participation Reduced NEET Healthy Lifestyle Choices Attainment and Achievement Successful Learners Confident Individuals Responsible Citizens Attitude and Engagement

50 Rethinking subjects school garden international visit choir band school council old people’s links fieldwork clubs and societies school performance Duke of Edinburgh charity work school team school newspaper work placement volunteering orchestra assembly mock trials Young Enterprise retreats scouts & guides animal care Subject programmes of study

51 What do schools need to do?  help adolescents develop an appetite for learning  use the ingredients  to create a learning feast  recognising individual taste, considerations and needs  see a big picture for curriculum

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54 Is it too obvious to state that young people will enjoy and value a curriculum that enables them to enjoy and value themselves? British Association of Advisers and Lecturers in Physical Education Is it too obvious to state that young people will enjoy and value a curriculum that enables them to enjoy and value themselves? British Association of Advisers and Lecturers in Physical Education

55 Purpose, places and partners A new opportunity in curriculum Mick Waters Director of Curriculum 22 April 2008

56 A big picture of the curriculum Copies of this CD are available from Twofour Learning, Stand S36 (near the Gallery Bar upstairs)

57 The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? Assessment fit for purpose Whole curriculum dimensions Learning approaches Components Accountability measures Every Child Matters outcomes Focus for learning Curriculum aims Be healthy Stay safe Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic wellbeing Attitudes and attributes eg determined, adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising Knowledge and understanding eg big ideas that shape the world Skills eg literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal, learning and thinking skills Successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society Confident individuals who are able to lead safe, healthy and fulfilling lives The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become To make learning and teaching more effective so that learners understand quality and how to improve Embraces peer- and self- assessmen t Uses tests and tasks appropriately Links to national standards which are consistently interpreted Helps identify clear targets for improvement Gives helpful feedback for the learner and other stakeholders Maximises pupils’ progress Promotes a broad and engaging curriculum Draws on a wide range of evidence of pupils’ learning Is integral to effective teaching and learning Informs future planning and teaching Statutory expectations PSHE PW EW+FC PEMuMFL RE SCMaICTHiGeEnD & TCiA & D Physical development Personal, social and emotional development Mathematical development Knowledge and understanding of the world Communication, language and literacy Creative development 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? Attainment and improved standards Behaviour and attendance Further involvement in education, employment or training Civic participation Healthy lifestyle choices To secure Including all learners with opportunities for learner choice and personalisation Using a range of audience and purpose Matching time to learning need eg deep, immersive and regular frequent learning In tune with human development A range of approaches eg enquiry, active learning, practical and constructive Building on learning beyond the school including community and business links Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development Overarching themes that have a significance for individuals and society, and provide relevant learning contexts: Identity and cultural diversity - Healthy lifestyles – Community participation – Enterprise – Global dimension and sustainable development – Technology and the media – Creativity and critical thinking. LessonsOut of schoolExtended hoursRoutinesEventsLocationsEnvironment A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

58 Curriculum opportunities During the key stage pupils should be offered the following opportunities that are integral to their learning and enhance their engagement with the concepts, processes and content of the subject. The curriculum should provide opportunities for pupils to: a) make choices about when and where it is appropriate to exploit technology to support them in learning and everyday life b) work creatively and collaboratively c) be independent, discriminating and reflective when choosing when to use technology d) apply ICT to real-world situations when solving problems and carrying out a range of tasks and enquiries e) share their views and experiences of ICT, considering the range of its uses and its significance to individuals, communities and society f) use ICT in other subjects and areas of learning with contexts that are relevant and interesting to them.

59 Range and content This section outlines the breadth of the subject on which teachers should draw when teaching the key concepts and key processes The study of ICT should include: a) use a range of information, with different characteristics, structures and purposes, and evaluation of how it matches requirements and its fitness for purpose b) use of a variety of information sources, including large data sets, in a range of contexts c) use and review of the effectiveness of different ICT tools, including a range of software applications, in terms of meeting user needs and solving problems d) Developing an understanding of the need to: - employ safe working practices in order to minimise physical stress - keep information secure - manage information organisation, storage and access to secure content and enable efficient retrieval e) The impact of ICT on individuals, communities and society, including the social, economic, legal and ethical implications of access to, and use of, ICT

60 Applications….. Software applications: For example, multimedia, desktop publishing, image manipulation, sound manipulation, word processing, spreadsheets, graphic, web browsers and . Safe working practices: For example, adjusting seating and lighting, avoiding hazards, taking breaks, arranging hardware and cables safely and using wrist rests and other devices where appropriate. Keep information secure: For example, keeping copies safe, backing up work and protecting passwords or PINs to avoid identity theft. Organisation, storage and access: For example, using appropriate file names, classifying folders in a meaningful way, using password protection and using back up files. The impact of ICT: This could include: issues relating to ownership, copyright, plagiarism and privacy of information; effects on employment and working practices; effects on local communities; sustainability issues; the causes and implications of unequal access to ICT locally, nationally and globally; and the abuse of ICT, including the issue of cyber bullying.

61 So what’s changed? An increased focus on whole curriculum design underpinned by Aims Increased flexibility – less prescription but focus on key concepts and processes in subjects. More room for personalisation and locally determined curriculum More emphasis on skills –functional and wider skills for learning and life More emphasis on personal development and ECM More opportunities for coherence and relevance - linking learning to life outside school, making connections between subjects, cross-curricular themes and dimensions A real opportunity for renewal and re-invigoration (BSF, Diplomas)

62 A distinctive purpose for key stage 3  a world of learning  open eyes to potential and possibilities  extended horizons  register and confidence  a rite of passage… with adults  approaches to learning

63 Range and content This section outlines the breadth of the subject on which teachers should draw when teaching the key concepts and key processes The study of ICT should include: a) use a range of information, with different characteristics, structures and purposes, and evaluation of how it matches requirements and its fitness for purpose b) use of a variety of information sources, including large data sets, in a range of contexts c) use and review of the effectiveness of different ICT tools, including a range of software applications, in terms of meeting user needs and solving problems d) Developing an understanding of the need to: - employ safe working practices in order to minimise physical stress - keep information secure - manage information organisation, storage and access to secure content and enable efficient retrieval e) The impact of ICT on individuals, communities and society, including the social, economic, legal and ethical implications of access to, and use of, ICT

64 Applications….. Software applications: For example, multimedia, desktop publishing, image manipulation, sound manipulation, word processing, spreadsheets, graphic, web browsers and . Safe working practices: For example, adjusting seating and lighting, avoiding hazards, taking breaks, arranging hardware and cables safely and using wrist rests and other devices where appropriate. Keep information secure: For example, keeping copies safe, backing up work and protecting passwords or PINs to avoid identity theft. Organisation, storage and access: For example, using appropriate file names, classifying folders in a meaningful way, using password protection and using back up files. The impact of ICT: This could include: issues relating to ownership, copyright, plagiarism and privacy of information; effects on employment and working practices; effects on local communities; sustainability issues; the causes and implications of unequal access to ICT locally, nationally and globally; and the abuse of ICT, including the issue of cyber bullying.

65 An increased focus on Skills A new framework for Personal, learning and thinking skills Independent enquirers Creative thinkers Reflective learners Team workers Self-managers Effective participators Functional skills English, Maths and ICT In POS Embedded in GCSE and Diploma Stand-alone qualifications

66 An increased focus on personal development The new Aims and the PLT skills framework emphasise the importance of personal development and ECM in the curriculum. New non-statutory programmes of study for personal wellbeing economic wellbeing draw together, in a coherent way, requirements for personal, social and health education, sex education, the social and emotional aspects of learning, careers education, enterprise, financial capability and work-related learning.

67  a secure base  a changing society  greater expectations for our young  the role and organisation of schooling  new leadership, new buildings, new workforce  the capacity to re-engineer The future for curriculum

68 The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Whole curriculum dimensions Creativity and critical thinking Community participation Global dimension and sustainable development Identity and cultural diversity Healthy lifestyles Enterprise Technology and the media Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

69 ICT can be used to find, develop, analyse and present information, as well as to model situations and solve problems. ICT enables rapid access to ideas and experiences from a wide range of people, communities and cultures, and allows pupils to collaborate and exchange information on a wide scale. ICT acts as a powerful force for change in society and citizens should have an understanding of the social, ethical, legal and economic implications of its use, including how to use ICT safely and responsibly. Increased capability in the use of ICT supports initiative and independent learning, as pupils are able to make informed judgements about when and where to use ICT to enhance their learning and the quality of their work. The importance of information and communication technology

70 The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? Assessment fit for purpose Whole curriculum dimensions Learning approaches Components Accountability measures Every Child Matters outcomes Focus for learning Curriculum aims Be healthy Stay safe Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic wellbeing Attitudes and attributes eg determined, adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising Knowledge and understanding eg big ideas that shape the world Skills eg literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal, learning and thinking skills Successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society Confident individuals who are able to lead safe, healthy and fulfilling lives The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become To make learning and teaching more effective so that learners understand quality and how to improve Embraces peer- and self- assessmen t Uses tests and tasks appropriately Links to national standards which are consistently interpreted Helps identify clear targets for improvement Gives helpful feedback for the learner and other stakeholders Maximises pupils’ progress Promotes a broad and engaging curriculum Draws on a wide range of evidence of pupils’ learning Is integral to effective teaching and learning Informs future planning and teaching Statutory expectations PSHE PW EW+FC PEMuMFL RE SCMaICTHiGeEnD & TCiA & D Physical development Personal, social and emotional development Mathematical development Knowledge and understanding of the world Communication, language and literacy Creative development 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? Attainment and improved standards Behaviour and attendance Further involvement in education, employment or training Civic participation Healthy lifestyle choices To secure Including all learners with opportunities for learner choice and personalisation Using a range of audience and purpose Matching time to learning need eg deep, immersive and regular frequent learning In tune with human development A range of approaches eg enquiry, active learning, practical and constructive Building on learning beyond the school including community and business links Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development Overarching themes that have a significance for individuals and society, and provide relevant learning contexts: Identity and cultural diversity - Healthy lifestyles – Community participation – Enterprise – Global dimension and sustainable development – Technology and the media – Creativity and critical thinking. LessonsOut of schoolExtended hoursRoutinesEventsLocationsEnvironment A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

71 Routines Extended hours Lessons EnvironmentEvents Locations Out of school The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Components Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

72 The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Learning approaches Using a range of audience and purpose Matching time to learning need eg deep, immersive and regular frequent learning In tune with human development A range of approaches eg enquiry, active learning, practical and constructive Building on learning beyond the school including community and business links Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development Including all learners with opportunities for learner choice and personalisation Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? A big picture of the curriculum Working draft January 2008 Adapted with thanks to colleagues at the Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment (CCEA)

73 Learning about….  relationships  PHSEE  adolescence  communication Responsible citizens, successful learners, confident individuals,


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