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Part 1 Roman Missal The Overview of the Catechesis Process Drawn from Bishop Arthur J. Serratelli’s presentation on Oct. 13, 2008 at the FDLC National.

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Presentation on theme: "Part 1 Roman Missal The Overview of the Catechesis Process Drawn from Bishop Arthur J. Serratelli’s presentation on Oct. 13, 2008 at the FDLC National."— Presentation transcript:

1 Part 1 Roman Missal The Overview of the Catechesis Process Drawn from Bishop Arthur J. Serratelli’s presentation on Oct. 13, 2008 at the FDLC National Meeting in Milwaukee

2 ► How can we be open to the good this new Roman Missal promises to bring, at the same time be honest about some of the difficulties that it poses? ► How can we implement the new Roman Missal in a spirit of charity and obedience? ► How can we maximize the good this Roman Missal can bring about in our parishes and other liturgical communities? ► How can we ease the discomfort many people are experiencing? Introductory Comments ● The issues before us are

3 ► Issues with the current translation ● The present translation sometimes strays pretty far from the original Latin ● Much of the rich language and imagery of the Latin has been lost ● Sometimes there are theological inaccuracies or lack of precision ● There is desire to render the translation such that It is more easily a proclamation text that is singable. DISCUSSION Recall some difficulties with the current translation. What needs improving? 1. Need for a New Translation ► Two factors: ● Promulgation of Liturgiam authenticam ● Promulgation of the third edition of the Roman Missal

4 ► Many people were involved in the translating, editing ► Compromises were essential at every level ► Everyone recognizes that the translation is not perfect; but we must also recognize that translation is an art rather than a perfect science. CHALLENGES One English translation for all English-speaking countries, but English is not the same for all peoples. Also, our English translation serves as an editio typica for those without translation resources. DISCUSSION Examples of language variations: gas :: petrol / elevator :: lift pop (father) :: pop (drinking soda) [name other examples] 2. Process of Translation

5 ● A deeper sense of the mystery of God’s presence in all the faithful ● A prime opportunity for fuller catechesis on the Mass and Christian living ● A more visible unity among Roman Rite Catholics, even though there will remain some diversity ● A favorable time to renew our eucharistic theology, spirituality, and practice DISCUSSION Why else, in particular parishes, would a new translation be important? What other good things will a new Roman Missal accomplish? 3. Why a New Translation is Important/What It Will Accomplish ► Liturgy is central to the life of the Church ► The new translation, will promote/accomplish

6 1) Latin orations often employ inversion, that is, they end with the most important words. 2) Biblical references embedded in the Roman Rite are more clearly evident 3) Allusions from patristic writings are more clear. 4) Rich and varied vocabulary of Roman Rite is respected. 5) Anthropomorphic expressions allow for greater imagery. 6) Concern for exactness of vocabulary whereby the catechetical, formative aspect of liturgical prayer is safeguarded. 7) Latin prayers are concise and noble in tone, often using “passive” (not everyday) vocabulary rather than “active” (everyday use) vocabulary. 4. Seven Characteristics of Latin Prayers this Translation Respects

7 ► Our liturgical language must be theologically accurate and free from ideologies. ► No translation is perfect, so this third edition of the Roman Missal is neither the last nor the final word on translation. ► This translation is a moment of organic growth within the ongoing liturgical renewal of the Church. 5. Principles We Honor ► This phase of Vatican II’s liturgical renewal (the third edition of the Missale Romanum) is not simply about changing rites or words, but about changing hearts. The work of renewal is ongoing and ongoing renewal requires ongoing catechesis. ► The ritual text and their language must be transcultural; that is, they cannot bear the cultural stamp or preference of any one particular country. ► The language must be intelligible but not banal.

8 Use for notes. Respond to the questions as soon as possible. Permission is granted to reprint the bulletin insert. God’s blessing and peace! Clergy Handout

9 Part 2 Roman Missal Sacrosanctum Concilium and Liturgical Renewal

10 ● While there was some catechesis in the early 1970s about the renewed rites that were being implemented, in too many cases the focus was on the changes rather than instilling an underlying theology of liturgy in general and Eucharist in particular ● Despite remarks to the contrary, there is no desire on the part of the Holy See to negate the principles set forth in Sacrosanctum Concilium. ● We wish to do two things in our time together: ► Consider some basic liturgical principles from Sacrosanctum Concilium ► Consider how far we’ve come and where growth still needs to happen Introductory comments ● Sacrosanctum Concilium (the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy; SC) remains the blueprint for liturgical renewal for the Church

11 ► Liturgy enacts the paschal mystery (cf. SC nos. 5, 6, 106) ► Liturgy is centered on Christ and his saving work (SC no. 7) > Christ is present in the person of his minister > Christ is present especially in the eucharistic species > Christ is present in the proclamation of the word; he himself speaks > Christ is present “when the Church prays and sings,” in the gathered assembly DISCUSSION How do you experience the paschal mystery in the celebration of liturgy? How do you experience the various presences of Christ in the liturgy? 1.Key Liturgical Principles from Sacrosanctum Concilium ● “For it is the liturgy through which, especially in the divine sacrifice of the Eucharist, ‘the work of our redemption is accomplished,’ and it is through the liturgy, especially, that the faithful are enabled to express in their lives and manifest to others the mystery of Christ and the real nature of the true Church” (no. 2).

12 ► Evangelization, conversion, penance, catechesis, works of charity are all activities of the Church which flow from and lead to liturgy (cf. SC no. 9) ► Popular devotions are to be encouraged, provided that they accord with the liturgy and are sound in theology and properly ordered (cf. SC no ) ► Liturgy is a foretaste of the heavenly liturgy and a pledge of future glory (cf. SC no. 8) DISCUSSION How is this statement about liturgy as source and summit played out in your daily living? How is this statement about liturgy as source and summit manifested in the life of your parish? 1.Key Liturgical Principles from Sacrosanctum Concilium ● “[T]he liturgy is the summit toward which the activity of the Church is directed; it is also the fount from which all her power flows” (SC no. 10).

13 ► Active participation = engagement in the postures and processions, acclaiming and praying, singing and silences of the rite ► Conscious participation = surrender to becoming assembly/Church; giving self over to something bigger than self; saying a conscious yes to God’s presence and activity ► Full participation = openness to God’s transforming action; being transformed by the Holy Spirit into ever more perfect members of the body of Christ DISCUSSION What enables this full, conscious, active participation? How do you as presider promote it more effectively? 1.Key Liturgical Principles from Sacrosanctum Concilium ● “Mother Church earnestly desires that all the faithful be led to that full, conscious, and active participation in liturgical celebrations which is demanded by the very nature of the liturgy, and to which the Christian people... have a right and obligation by reason of their baptism” (SC no. 15; also, nos. 21, 30, 48).

14 ► Always safeguard that liturgy is celebration of the whole Church (cf. SC nos ) ► Distinguished by simplicity: short, clear, and free of useless repetitions (cf. SC no. 34) ► Make clear intimate connection between rite and words (cf. SC no. 35) ► Because of different peoples and cultures, liturgy may be carefully adapted (cf. nos ) ► Liturgical catechesis must be ongoing and thorough (cf. SC no. 19) DISCUSSION What is the value of liturgical renewal? What are the unchangeable elements of the Mass? What are changeable elements of the Mass? 1.Key Liturgical Principles from Sacrosanctum Concilium ● “In order that the Christian people may more certainly derive an abundance of graces from the sacred liturgy, holy Mother Church desires to undertake with great care a general restoration of the liturgy itself. For the liturgy is made up of unchangeable elements divinely instituted, and of elements subject to change” (SC no. 21).

15 ● Sense of paschal mystery● Come to deeper lived experience of liturgy ● Genuine spirit of caring community● Liturgical community as body of Christ ● Active participation● Full, conscious, active participation ● Liturgy as external rubrics● Liturgy as internal surrender ● Vernacular liturgy ● Genuine inculturation ● Presence through sound and song● Presence through shared silence ● Music in the rite● Music as the rite DISCUSSION What needs to be added to this list? DISCUSSION What encourages you about this list? What discourages you about this list? 2. How Far We Have Come – Where We Still Need to Grow WHERE WE ARE TODAY ► WHERE WE STILL NEED TO GROW

16 Use for notes. Respond to the questions as soon as possible. Permission is granted to reprint the bulletin insert. God’s blessing and peace! Clergy Handout

17 Part 3 Roman Missal Structural Elements of the Missals Of Pius V ( ), Paul VI (1975), John Paul II (2002)

18 ► In the first centuries of the Church there was diversity in the way the Mass was celebrated from Christian community to Christian community. It was always understood, however, to be the one Eucharist of the whole Church. ► The first Mass book to bear the title of Roman Missal came in 1474 and was similar to the Missal of Innocent III (+1216). ► The Missal of Pius V (promulgated in 1570 after the Council of Trent) was used with only slight revisions for four centuries. ► Post-Vatican II; Missals in 1965 (provisional), 1970, 1975, 2002 Introductory comments ● The Mass ritual has undergone many changes since its present fourfold structure became recognizable (probably by mid- to-late- second century), consisting of some type of introductory rites; a Liturgy of the Word, Liturgy of the Eucharist and some kind of brief concluding rite.

19 ● Liturgy of the Word ► Pius V (1570/1962) ► Paul VI (1975) ► John Paul II (2002) ● Liturgy of the Eucharist ► Pius V (1570/1962) ► Paul VI (1975) ► John Paul II (2002) ● Concluding rite ► Pius V (1575/1962) ► Paul VI (1975) ► John Paul II (2002) 1. Comparison of Structural Elements ► John Paul II (2002) ● Introductory rites (all three missals begin Mass with the sign of the cross) ► Pius V (1570/1962) ► Paul VI (1975)

20 DISCUSSION Obviously, the most significant structural changes are between the Missal of Pius V (1570/1962) and the Missal of Paul VI (1975). What are they? How have these changes helped/hindered the celebration of Mass with the faithful? The structural changes between the Missal of Paul VI (1975) and that of John Paul II (2002) are much more minor and subtle. Name some of them. 1. Comparison of Structural Elements

21 ► Shift from oblation language to blessing language ► Fewer prayers acknowledging sinfulness and begging God’s mercy ► Elimination of repetitions (e.g., Confiteor, multiple signs of the cross) ► More biblical texts used in rite itself ► Shift in language so offering is clearly in third part of Eucharistic prayer ► More options for introductions in words fitting a particular community, choices for texts, alternative opening prayer, more eucharistic prayers (with explicit double epiclesis in most) and prefaces ► Old Testament reading added, three-year Sunday and two-year weekday cycles of readings ► From sermon to homily (even encouraged on weekdays) 2. Analysis of Theological, Pastoral, and Spiritual Implications ● From the Missal of Pius V (1570/1962) to the Missal of Paul VI (1975)

22 DISCUSSION [large group] Other differences... Implications of these differences... Where is there organic development from one Missal to the other? 2. Analysis of Theological, Pastoral, and Spiritual Implications ● From the Missal of Pius V (1570/1962) to the Missal of Paul VI (1975), cont. ► Addition of Gospel procession, procession and presentation of gifts, general intercessions, sign of peace, Communion under both species, emphasis on receiving Bread consecrated at same Mass, acclamations ► Lay liturgical ministries opened up, use of vernacular, free-standing altar ► Fewer private prayers of priest and people

23 ► More submissive stance of people before God and more emphasis on unworthiness ► Preference for proper chants over hymns ► Use of Book of Gospels and only it may be carried in procession ► Communion under both kinds permitted, but not included in ritual text; no rubrical emphasis on receiving hosts consecrated at same Mass ► New translation principle, new translation [discussed in later segment] DISCUSSION [large group] Other differences... Implications of these differences Analysis of Theological, Pastoral, and Spiritual Implications ● From the Missal of Paul VI (1975) to the Missal of John Paul II (2002) ► Shifts in language (e.g., penitential rite to penitential act; opening prayer to collect; general intercessions to universal prayer or prayer of the faithful)

24 Clergy Handout Use for notes. Respond to the questions as soon as possible. Permission is granted to reprint the bulletin insert. God’s blessing and peace! Clergy Handout

25 Part 4 Roman Missal The Art of Presiding

26 ► While the liturgy is never focused on the presider, per se, the presider plays a crucial role in the liturgy’s unfolding in a prayerful way. ► If the presider prays, the community prays. If the presider does not pray, it is very difficult for the community to be led in prayer. ► All the gestures, postures, proclaiming, speaking, singing and use of symbols by the presider must reflect something beautiful. This doesn’t mean the presider does all these necessarily perfectly, but he must do them with sincerity and to the best of his ability. ● Sacrosanctum Concilium (the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy) says this about clergy and the art of presiding : “Priests, both secular and religious, who are already working in the Lord’s vineyard, are to be helped by every suitable means to a fuller understanding of what they are about when they perform sacred rites, to live the liturgical life and to share it with the faithful entrusted to their care” (SC no. 18). Introductory Comments ● Presiding is an “art”; that is, the deliberate human production of something beautiful.

27 Introductory Comments ► We must constantly seek to understand the liturgy better so we can convey to the people entrusted to our care the mystery and awe of this celebration we do to praise and thank our God for the many gifts given to us. ► This understanding of liturgy cannot simply be theoretical knowledge, but must be something lived every day. A priest’s spirituality is essentially a liturgical spirituality.

28 ● Genuine love for the people you serve ● Patience when the celebration doesn’t unfold quite the way you might wish ● Surrender of self to the liturgical action. Get yourself out of the way so Christ can shine and minister through you ● Care about all you are and do: deportment of life, appropriateness of dress, careful preparation of homily and other elements of the liturgy ● Humility in being chosen to be God’s servant ● Joy in celebrating and living, in ministering and leisure times DISCUSSION Other qualities of effective presiding you think are important and why... PERSONAL REFLECTION What I do well in my presiding is... Where I think I need to improve is Qualities of Effective Presiding ● Prayerfulness both during liturgy and in your everyday living

29 ► Silences > GIRM: The purpose of silence “depends on the time it occurs in each part of the celebration. Thus, within the Act of Penitence and again after the invitation to pray, all recollect themselves; but at the conclusion of a reading or the homily, all meditate briefly on what they have heard; then after Communion, they praise and pray to God in their hearts” (no. 45). -How long ought these silences be? The presider is to “read” the assembly’s prayer and know when to move on; the silences won’t be the same length during any one Mass, or from Mass to Mass. In general, they ought to be at least ten to fifteen seconds long, longer as the assembly becomes more used to the silences and knows what to “do” during them. 2. Facility in Effective Presiding ● Pace the liturgy; this rhythm is presider’s responsibility, not that of other ministers

30 1) The presider and other liturgical ministers are actually praying themselves. Bowed head, perhaps closed eyes, relaxed and still body signal prayer to the assembly. No other action or sound ought to happen during this time. 2) A bulletin notice that is repeated weekly until silence is “heard” in the assembly. The following is a suggestion: The prayer of liturgy unfolds in a rhythm of sound and silence. Silence is not simply an absence of sound, but a time for prayer, recollection, and meditation. Whenever there is an invitation to silence—for example, “Let us pray”—then we become quiet and speak to our caring God in the depths of our hearts. 2. Facility in Effective Presiding CATECHESIS OF THE ASSEMBLY Two things help the assembly to know that the silences are part of the prayer, and not just a “refreshing pause.”

31 - During the penitential act after the invitation, “Brethren (brothers and sisters), let us acknowledge our sins, that we may prepare ourselves to celebrate the sacred mysteries.” [LEAVE SUFFICIENT TIME SO THAT A SINCERE ACKNOWLEDGMENT AND PREPARATION CAN ACTUALLY HAPPEN] - During presidential prayers (except the prayer after Communion, if silence has been already observed) STRUCTURE OF PRESIDENTIAL PRAYERS (COLLECTS) > Invitation to pray (“Let us pray.”) > Prayer (individually during the silence) > Collect > Assembly response (Amen) - At the prayer of the faithful, after each intention is announced the assembly prays during a brief silence (unless another form of the prayer of the faithful with different response is used; GIRM 71 ). - Except for the voice of the presider and when the assembly responds with the appropriate acclamations, there is silence during the eucharistic prayer ( cf. GIRM nos. 78; 147 ) - After the Communion procession is completed (unless a psalm or canticle or hymn of praise is sung) 2. Facility in Effective Presiding > Required silences (because of the very structure of the liturgical element)

32 - Before Mass “observed in the church, in the sacristy, in the vesting room, and in adjacent areas, so that all may dispose themselves to carry out the sacred action in a devout and fitting manner” (GIRM no. 45). - During the Liturgy of the Word which “is to be celebrated in such a way as to promote meditation, and so any haste that hinders recollection must clearly be avoided... it is also appropriate to include brief periods of silence, accommodated to the gathered assembly, in which, at the prompting of the Holy Spirit, the word of God may be grasped by the heart and a response through prayer may be prepared. It may be appropriate to observe such periods of silence, for example, before the Liturgy of the Word itself begins, after the first and second reading, and lastly at the conclusion of the homily” (GIRM no. 56). ► Processions and other movements (e.g., a minister approaching the ambo) should not be hurried, but rather a steady, reverent pace is befitting the liturgy. 2. Facility in Effective Presiding > Recommended silences (but not required)

33 > Orans position: elbows slightly bent, arms lifted, palms turned upward, traditional Jewish and Christian prayer posture, usually indicated in rubrics by “with hands extended” > Greeting: usually indicated in rubrics with “extending his hands,” this would be a simple gesture of inclusivity, reaching out to the assembly > Epiclesis: indicated in the rubrics with “holding his hands extended over the offerings,” the hands are held slightly above the bread and wine, palms down ► Other gestures (e.g., sign of the cross) are to be made reverently and fully ► Bows and genuflections need to be done slowly and reverently ► Sitting (in presider chair) is never a slouch, never with legs crossed; standing is on both feet ► “Custody of the eyes” - When prayer text addressed to God, the eyes need to be either reading from the Roman Missal or slightly lifted up; it is not appropriate to have eye contact with the assembly during prayer because this sends the wrong signal to the assembly about the speech act. - When greeting the assembly, it is not only appropriate but even proper to have eye contact with them. - When listening to the proclamations, the presider should look at the lector; when praying the responsorial psalm, either have eyes closed or else look at the cantor. 2. Facility in Effective Presiding ● Gestures and postures ► Three types of “extended hands” gesture

34 ● Principle of progressive solemnity: “The ‘principle of progressive solemnity’... offers the possibility of a rich and pleasing variety. The criteria are the particular day or hour being celebrated, the character of the individual elements comprising the [liturgy], the size and composition of the community, as well as the number of singers available in the circumstances” ( General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours, no. 273 ). ► This principle suggests that the degree of festivity (Sunday, solemnity, feast, optional or obligatory memorial) be marked by the way various liturgical elements are enhanced ► Singing ( cf. GIRM nos ): the new Roman Missal includes much more notation and encouragement for more of the Mass to be sung (even with a “not so good voice,” a presider can chant with a pleasant sound). > Singing by presider and assembly is not to be absent on Sundays and solemnities ( GIRM no. 40 ) > The number of elements sung would increase as the degree of festivity increases ► Incensation ( Cf. GIRM nos ) 2. Facility in Effective Presiding ● Attitude: one of respect, prayer, attention

35 PERSONAL REFLECTION What I do well to facilitate prayerful and beautiful liturgy is... Where I think I need to improve is Facility in Effective Presiding DISCUSSION Other things to facilitate effective presiding you think are important and why...

36 Clergy Handout Use for notes. Respond to the questions as soon as possible. Permission is granted to reprint the bulletin insert. God’s blessing and peace! Clergy Handout

37 Part 5 Roman Missal Praying the Prayers of the New Missal

38 ► The 1975 translation in many cases is much more a paraphrase, rendered in fairly colloquial US English, lost much of the imagery of the original Latin, and was much shorter than the original text. In some cases, the English translation was significantly different from the Latin. Some of the English orations were so short as to barely function as prayer. ► The translation of the 2002 Missale Romanum corresponds as closely as possible to the Latin, retains its imagery (even when the language is not part of the everyday vocabulary of the average person), and is much more metaphoric. ► The new ordo Missae translation also duplicates to a large extent the Latin word order, which in some cases will sound very foreign to English speakers. Introductory Comments ● There is a significant difference in the way the Latin editio typica has been translated.

39 ● It will be challenging to priest presiders to pray familiar prayers that they have memorized and often pray without referring to the Missal. Until the former translation is “unlearned” and the new translation comes easily, the priest will have to refer to the Roman Missal much more often. ● The priest cannot take for granted the proper prayers of the Mass but will need to prepare them so they can be prayed well. Introductory Comments ● Careful attention will have to be paid to implementing the changes in the people’s prayers and responses. Probably the easiest way to facilitate this is to have pew cards for each worshiper with the new texts clearly printed out. This will be particularly challenging when only a few words have been changed in responses.

40 ► Different genres of texts > Greetings (rendered in a pleasant, welcoming tone with direct eye contact) > Acclamations (rendered in a strong voice ringing with conviction; the acclamations are best when they are sung) > Proclamation (usually include different genres in a single reading; hence, proclamation always requires different “voices”; eye contact) > Narrative (rendered as a story being told; speak to the assembly as those hearing the story) > Supplication (rendered with a humble, pleading, confident voice) > Prayer (rendered with a voice filled with awe, wonder, and breadth of voice) > Doxology (rendered with a strong, joyful voice of praise) > Creed (rendered with a recitation tone filled with conviction) > Invitations (rendered with direct eye contact and an appealing voice) 1.The Vocal Nature of our Liturgical Prayer ● Not all liturgical texts are to be rendered in the same “voice.”

41 REFLECTION The genres I am most comfortable using are... The genres I need to pay more attention to are... The genres I have the most difficulty rendering well are... 1.The Vocal Nature of our Liturgical Prayer DISCUSSION Other kinds of texts/genres and how to render them...

42 > Projection (“throwing the voice”—not a matter of increasing volume) > Rhythm (pacing of introductions, invitations, body of prayers, conclusions) > Cadence (rhythmic flow of a sequence of sounds or words) > Volume (loudness or softness of voice; e.g., acclamations sung more forcefully than a supplication) > Emphasis (increased volume, change in body language, very slight pause before and after a word or phrase) > Connection with body language (e.g., leaning toward the assembly slightly when addressing them, head slightly raised in supplication) 1.The Vocal Nature of our Liturgical Prayer ► Different voice qualities

43 DISCUSSION Other kinds of voice qualities and when to use them... REFLECTION The “voices” I am most comfortable using are... The “voices” I need to pay more attention to are... The “voices” I have the most difficulty rendering well are... 1.The Vocal Nature of our Liturgical Prayer ● Voicing will vary greatly not only according to the text, but also according to the occasion, degree of progressive solemnity, time of day for the celebration, size of the assembly, the kind of liturgical celebration.

44 ● Readily recognizable improvements in the presidential prayers ► Collect for Epiphany (Mass during the day) Latin 2002 Deus, qui hodierna die Unigenitum tuum gentibus stella duce revelasti, concede propitius, ut qui iam te ex fide cognovimus, usque ad contemplandam speciem tuae celsitudinis perducamur. Per Dominum Father, you revealed your Son to the nations by the guidance of a star. Lead us to your glory in heaven by the light of faith. We ask this through our Lord… 2010 O God, who on this day revealed your Only-Begotten Son to the nations by the guidance of a star, grant in your mercy that we who know you now by faith may be brought to behold the beauty of your sublime glory. Through our Lord Some Examples from the New Translation

45 > No translation of “hodierna” in the 1975 translation, so no reference to this feast > The petition in the 1975 translation focuses on our being led to glory; the 2010 translation focuses on our knowing God by faith and beholding (contemplandam) the beauty (speciem, shape form, especially beautiful form) of God’s glory. 2. Some Examples from the New Translation > unigenitum, propitius, cognovimus, contemplandam were not translated at all

46 ► Prayer over the offerings (Christmas: Mass at Dawn) Latin 2002 Munera nostra, quaesumus, Domine, nativitatis hodiernae mysteriis apta proveniant, ut sicut homo genitus idem praefulsit et Deus, sic nobis haec terrena substantia conferat quod divinum est. Per Christum Father, may we follow the example of your Son who became man and lived among us. May we receive the gift of divine life through these offerings here on earth. We ask this in the name of Jesus the Lord May these gifts, O Lord, we pray, offered on this feast of our Savior’s birth, be worthy of the mystery we celebrate: just as he who was born a man shone forth also as God, so may these earthly gifts bring us gifts divine. Through Christ our Lord. 2. Some Examples from the New Translation

47 > Two petitions in the former prayer: follow Christ’s example and receive the gift of divine life. In 2010 prayer, seamless prayer with one petition connecting “these earthly gifts” with “gifts divine.” Much more poetic rendering 2. Some Examples from the New Translation > Reference to the feast omitted in 1975 translation

48 ► Prayer after Communion (Wednesday of Second Week of Easter) Latin 2002 Populo tuo, quaesumus, Domine, adesto propitius, et, quem mysteriis caelestibus imbuisti, fac ad novitatem vitae de vetustate transire. Per Christum Merciful Father, may these mysteries give us new purpose and bring us to a new life in you. Grant this through Christ our Lord Graciously be present to your people, we pray, O Lord, and lead those you have nourished with heavenly mysteries to pass to a new way of life from the old. Through Christ our Lord. > The sense of passing over (transire) from the old to the new, so important for what is celebrated in the Easter season, is lost in the former translation. 2. Some Examples from the New Translation

49 ► Collect (9 th Sunday in Ordinary Time) Latin 2002 Deus, cuius providentia in sui dispositione non fallitur, te supplices exoramus, ut noxia cuncta submoveas, et omnia nobis profutura concedas. Per Dominum Father, your love never fails. Hear our call. Keep us from danger and provide for all our needs. Grant this through our Lord… 2010 O God, whose providence never fails in its design, humbly we implore you to banish all that would harm us and to grant all that works for our good. Through our Lord... > Deus is consistently translated as God (rather than “Father,” which is bothersome to some members of the assembly) 2. Some Examples from the New Translation

50 ● Inconsistencies in the presidential prayers ► Collect for First Sunday of Advent Latin 2002 Da, quaesumus, omnipotens Deus, hanc tuis fidelibus voluntatem, ut, Christo tuo venienti iustis operibus occurrentes, eius dexterae sociati, regnum mereantur possidere caeleste. Per Dominum All–powerful God, increase our strength of will for doing good that Christ may find an eager welcome at his coming and call us to his side in the Kingdom of heaven, where he lives and reigns … 2010 Almighty God, grant, we pray, to your faithful people, the will to run to meet Christ with good deeds at his coming, so that, gathered at his right hand, they may be worthy to possess the heavenly kingdom. Through our Lord… > Although the Latin begins with “grant, we pray, and then the address to God, this collect begins with the address to God. 2. Some Examples from the New Translation

51 > Address to God (sometimes embellished; e.g., “Almighty everlasting” God) > Attribute (says something about God) > Petition (states our need) > Statement of mediation [address + embellishment] Almighty everlasting God, [attribute] who in your overflowing compassion surpass the merits and desires of those who pray, [petition] pour out your mercy upon us, to pardon what conscience dreads and to add what prayer does not venture to ask. [mediation] Through our Lord… (Collect, 27 th Sunday in Ordinary Time) 2. Some Examples from the New Translation ► Typical elements of a collect structure (but sometimes the order is changed):

52 ► Sometimes the address to God is delayed until after an initial statement: We celebrate, O God, the most sacred Supper, in which your Only-Begotten Son, soon to hand himself over to death, entrusted to the Church for ever the new sacrifice and the banquet of his love; grant us, we pray, that out of so great a mystery we may draw the fullness of charity and life. Through our Lord... (Collect, Thursday of the Lord’s Supper: Evening Mass) 2. Some Examples from the New Translation ► Sometimes the collects place the address to God first: O God, who make this most holy night radiant with the glory of the Lord’s Resurrection, stir up in your Church the spirit of adoption, so that, renewed in body and mind, we may render you undivided service. Through our Lord... (Collect, Paschal Vigil)

53 ► Omitted from the 2010 Roman Missal opening prayers > Alternative opening prayer (original US texts not in Latin editio typica) > Optional prayer intention (original US texts not in Latin editio typica) 2. Some Examples from the New Translation ► Sometimes the attribute is not clear at all or is absent: Turn our hearts to you, eternal Father, and grant that, in seeking always the one thing necessary and carrying out the works of charity, we may be dedicated to your worship. Through our Lord... (Collect, Saturday of the First Week of Lent)

54 ● The new presidential prayers have multiple clauses and are one sentence. ► Careful preparation (especially by practicing out loud) will help the presider hear what needs to be emphasized. ► It is not always helpful to pause after every line; meaning determines pauses. ► The more formal language and use of perhaps unfamiliar terms and imagery means that the prayers must be prayed distinctly. ● The texts of the Roman Missal cannot be changed by any individual. “Therefore no other person, not even a priest, may add, remove, or change anything in the liturgy on his own authority” (SC 22[3]). REFLECTION What I hear that leaves me enthusiastic about the new translation is... What I hear that I find myself resisting is Praying the New Texts ● The unfamiliar translation of the presidential prayers and Eucharistic prayers will need to be slowed down in pace and truly prayed if the richness of their meaning is to come through.

55 Use for notes. Respond to the questions as soon as possible. Permission is granted to reprint the bulletin insert. God’s blessing and peace! Clergy Handout

56 Part 6 Roman Missal Leadership in a Time of Change Drawn from “Liturgical Leadership in a Time of Change” by Most Rev. Gerald F. Kicanas, Bishop of Tucson

57 ● Those primarily responsible for the essential catechesis on liturgy and reception of the new Roman Missal include the US bishops, the USCCB, the Bishops Committee on Divine Worship, the Secretariat for Divine Worship, diocesan worship committees (commissions), diocesan worship office directors, pastors and priests, parish liturgists and parish musicians. ● The best approach leadership can take is to understand; ► The implementation of the Roman Missal is an opportunity for catechesis on the liturgy ► That how smoothly the implementation goes depends on careful preparation ► That not everyone will be happy about the changes; but with a positive implementation process they may grow into being less resistant ► That liturgy is at the center of the Church’s life and doing it well is part of our responsibility in carrying on Christ’s saving mission ► That leadership’s attitude and gentle patience will have an enormous effect on the folks in the pew. Introductory Comments ● The success of the implementation of the new Roman Missal depends largely on how the leadership receives the Missal and implements it. Attitude is key.

58 PERSONAL ASSESSMENT The major changes in my life that have made me who I am are... I respond to changes in these ways... 1.Change as Fact of Life and Human Responses ● Change is a fact of life: growing from infancy to adulthood, from ignorance to knowledge, from selfishness to generosity, from self- centeredness to self-giving... ● Our responses to change are varied: anticipation and acceptance, enthusiasm and creativity, acceptance and integration, resistance and sense of loss, indifference and non-acceptance, shock and refusal...

59 “In order that the Christian people may more certainly derive an abundance of graces from the sacred liturgy, holy Mother Church desires to undertake with great care a general restoration of the liturgy itself. For the liturgy is made up of unchangeable elements divinely instituted, and elements subject to change. These latter not only may be changed but ought to be changed with the passage of time... ” (SC no. 21) DISCUSSION Name the most significant and positive liturgical changes that have occurred in our lifetime... Name the changes that have occurred in our lifetime that remain problematic for some and why Liturgical Change as a Fact of the Church ● The Magisterium keeps the Church in continuity with the intentions of Jesus Christ; the Church, as a living and human institution, changes through time.

60 ► Our preparation must include catechesis that is much broader than simply informing people about what is going to change > Encouragement for everyone to prepare diligently to celebrate liturgy > Deepen the sense of the sacred > Enrich the proclamation of the word as it is read and heard > Improve the content and delivery of homilies > Help for learning how to pray better, especially liturgically > Add to the beauty and care given to how liturgy is celebrated, how the liturgical environment is enhanced, how welcoming is our liturgy ► Our preparation must be sustained over a length of time (actually, years) and be undertaken with a positive attitude PERSONAL ASSESSMENT My attitude toward ongoing liturgical catechesis for myself is... My attitude toward ongoing liturgical catechesis for the people I serve is Liturgical Change as a Fact of the Church ● The changes in the translation of the new Roman Missal will occur. That is a given. But what is not given is how priests and people prepare, receive, and implement those changes. Preparation is critical for how the changes will be received.

61 ► Help self and others learn why the liturgical changes are happening, how to embrace them, and what the changes are meant to accomplish ► The best change occurs slowly, with time for the change to be internalized ► If possible, introduce one change at a time ● The bishop is the chief liturgist in his diocese and bears responsibility for faithfully implementing all legitimate liturgical changes and norms ► He cannot fulfill his diocesan liturgical responsibilities without the help and wholehearted cooperation, first, of the priests serving in the diocese and, second, of all who bear any kind of leadership responsibility at the diocesan or parish levels. 3. Liturgical Leadership Matters ● Leadership bears the responsibility for helping people understand the reasons for changes, help for responding positively to the changes, and patience and understanding with people’s concerns and frustrations.

62 ► Revitalization of people’s sense of liturgy as the “summit toward which the activity of the Church is directed;... [as] the fount from which all her power flows” (SC no. 10). > Developing a strong liturgical spirituality as the foundation for Christian living > Increased sensitivity to the plight of all peoples and generous care for them ► Bringing people back to the Church’s household of the faith ► Renewed self-understanding as a eucharistic people DISCUSSION I am most comfortable with my liturgical leadership role when... I am uncomfortable with these things that I am hearing Liturgical Leadership Matters ● Many other benefits to the Church are anticipated if the implementation of the Roman Missal is carried forth carefully, sensitively, and fruitfully

63 ► Step 1: Development of catechetical materials > Materials available from -USCCB Web site -National groups (e.g., FDLC, NAAL, CAL, NOCERCC, NDCL) -Commentaries being published as books and periodical issues or articles -Diocesan bishops and liturgy offices 4. Process of Implementation ● Stage 1: From the present to the time of recognitio by the Holy See

64 > Refresher on core liturgical documents - Sacrosanctum Concilium (Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy) - Mirae caritatis (May 28, 1902 encyclical, Pope Leo XIII) - Mediator Dei (November 20, 1947 encyclical, Pope Pius XII) - Mysterium fidei (September 3, 1965 encyclical, Pope Paul VI) - Ecclesia de Eucharistia (April 17, 2003 encyclical, Pope John Paul II) - Dies Domini (May 31, 1998 apostolic letter, Pope John Paul II) - Sacramentum caritatis (2007 post synodal spostolic exhortation, Pope Benedict XVI) > Series of homilies (throughout the year) that would touch on the -History of liturgy -Roman Missal -Structure of the Mass -Liturgy as encounter with Christ (spirituality of liturgy) -Importance of symbols and gestures -Other pertinent topics 4. Process of Implementation ► Step 2: Distributing and teaching the materials

65 > Schools, Parish Schools of Religion or CCD, parish meetings, etc. would all incorporate liturgical instruction ► Step 3: Introduction and integration of mystagogy > Celebrate liturgy beautifully and well > Provide reflection opportunities (perhaps lead questions in the bulletin) to help internalize what is being learned 4. Process of Implementation > Diocesan and parish liturgy workshops

66 ► Focused effort by priests and other liturgical leaders to prepare all for changes > Become familiar with revised texts > Begin learning new music for ritual texts ► Acquaint folks with changes in people’s parts > Distribute texts (diocesan papers, bulletin inserts, pew cards) > Practice familiar responses that have been memorized for years but are now changed > Learn new music for common texts 4. Process of Implementation ● Stage 2: Time between recognitio and implementation

67 ► Implementation will go well to the extent that Stages 1 and 2 have been carried out well ► Changes need to be introduced reverently and respectfully ► Help people realize that when changes become learned and they are comfortable with them, then the changes will not distract or deter from the liturgy but add value and beauty and greater mystery to its celebration “... it is through the liturgy, especially, that the faithful are enabled to express in their lives and manifest to others the mystery of Christ and the real nature of the true Church” (SC no. 2). 4. Process of Implementation ● Stage 3: During and after implementation

68 Use for notes. Respond to the questions as soon as possible. Permission is granted to reprint the bulletin insert. God’s blessing and peace! Clergy Handout


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