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Week 3: Lin Hai-yin and Memories of Peking [Sep 26, 2013] Instructor: Richard Rong-bin Chen, PhD. Adjunct Assistant Professor, Graduate Institute of Taiwan.

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Presentation on theme: "Week 3: Lin Hai-yin and Memories of Peking [Sep 26, 2013] Instructor: Richard Rong-bin Chen, PhD. Adjunct Assistant Professor, Graduate Institute of Taiwan."— Presentation transcript:

1 Week 3: Lin Hai-yin and Memories of Peking [Sep 26, 2013] Instructor: Richard Rong-bin Chen, PhD. Adjunct Assistant Professor, Graduate Institute of Taiwan Literature, NTU Taiwan Fiction and Postwar Urban Experience

2 Lin Hai-yin ( ) Born in Osaka, Japan. Father was a Hakka from Miaoli, mother a Fukien Taiwanese from Taipei. Moved to Peking when she was 5 years old (1923). Father died the year she graduated from the elementary school at a young age of 42. Graduate of Peking Junior College of Journalism [ 世界 新聞專科學校 ]. This work is licensed by 林海音家 屬 for the use of “Course Database of General Education TW” ONLY. The copyright belongs to the above mentioned creator and we do not have the authorization right.

3 More Than an Author Lived in Peking for 25 years, and later in Taiwan for 53 years. Returned Taiwan in The author of 3 novels, 4 story collections, 19 collections of essays and 10 children’s books. Editor of Mandarin Daily News [ 國語日報 ] ( ) Editor-in-chief of the United Daily News literary supplement [ 聯合報副刊 ] ( ). Pure Literature Monthly [ 純文學月刊 ] ( ) Pure Literature Publication House [ 純文學出版社 ] ( )

4 History of the City’s Name 1271—Kublai Khan established Yuan Dynasty. 1272—Khanbaliq [ 大都 ] was chosen as the imperial city; Kublai united China 7 years later —the first two emperors of Ming Dynasty used Nanking [ 南京 ] as the imperial city; Khabaliq was renamed Peiping [ 北平 ]. From 1421, Peiping was renamed Peking [ 北 京 ], and it had since become the capital for 3 different historical period in China, that is, Ming Dynasty ( ), Qing Dynasty ( ), and ROC ( ).

5 In 1928, President Chiang Kai-shek defeated the warlords who had owned North China since 1911 with his military maneuver, “the Northern Expedition” [ 北伐 ], reuniting China, and made Nanking new capital of ROC. Peking was named Peiping again. In 1949, Chairman Mao Tse-tung took Peiping, and changed its name to Beijing according to the pinyin romanization system.

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7 Tiananmen in 1901

8 Tiananmen at sometime before 1940

9 Tiananmen on Oct 1 st, 1940

10 Wikipedia Peter Morgan from Beijing, China

11 Memories of Peking: South Side Stories Published as Ch‘engnan chiushih [ 城南舊事 ] in 1960, and translated into English in Differentiates itself from some of the more anti- communist works of fiction at that time with an innocent, romantic, and witty tone  point of view. Both a story collection and a rite-of-passage autobiographical novel (bildungsroman). “Hui-an Hostel”[ 惠安館 ] “Let Us Go and See the Sea” [ 我們看海去 ] “Lan I-niang” [ 蘭姨娘 ] “Donkey Rolls” [ 驢打滾 ] “Papa’s Flowers Have Fallen—And I Was No Longer A Child” [ 爸爸的花兒落了 我也不再是小孩了 ]

12 Taiwan’s Memories of Peking After the 1949 Great Retreat, more than 1 million and two hundred thousand mainlanders relocated themselves from China to Taiwan. Among them, there were almost 8000 from Peking. During their extended stay in Taiwan, from 1949 to 1987, the year Martial Law was lifted, they were not allowed to visit relatives or to return hometowns legally. Written to remind people their ways of life in the past, one of the reasons why Memories of Peking has become popular and classical might be closely related to its evocation effect of arousing the readers’ feeling of nostalgia.

13 China’s Memories of Peking Memories of Peking was made into a feature film in 1982 by director Wu Yigong [ 吳貽弓 ]. Why it became a best-selling film? Put into the socio-political background of the 1980s in the post-Mao and post-Cultural Revolution Mainland China, as the Old Beijing was beginning to vanish away into history, it was fairly easy to imagine that what the moviegoers wanted to grasp in the film was the old Beijing before urban renovation changed the city once for all.

14 “Hui-an Hostel” ( 惠安館 ) Where is Hui-an? What is Hui-an Hostel? Does it help you know something about Peking? Main characters: Ying-tzu [ 英子 ]: a 6-year-old girl Hsiu-chen [ 秀珍 ]: an insane young woman Niu-erh [ 妞兒 ] / Hsiao Kuei-tzu [ 小桂子 ] (?): another 6-year-old who’s learning to be a singer Hu-t’ung [ 胡同 ] and the details of everyday. What kind of story is this?

15 Lin Hai-yin vs. Anti-communist Stories "Mr. Candlestick." Black Tears: Stories in the War-torn China, Peng Ko [ 彭歌,《黑色的眼 淚》 ] Like “Hui-an Hostel,” also a story about friendship, but written in a completely different way. The lives of the narrator and Mr. Candlestick from their childhood to the narrator’s relocation to Taiwan. Mr. Candlestick’s transformation. Political messages: title of the story; revenge.

16 16 David Der-wei Wang [ 王德威 ] “Reinventing National History: Communist and Anti-Communist Fiction of the Mid-Twentieth Century” in Chinese Literature in the Second Half of a Modern Century (2000).

17 17 The Post-1949 Literary Scene in Taiwan “Insofar as history always involves a narrative through which discrete, tangible data are organized into an intelligible discourse, how would the Nationalist government explain, or explain away, the causes of its mainland debacle? How would the government reclaim its legitimacy over the mainland, if not in political terms, at least in narrative terms?” (Wang, 40) Source: David Der-wei Wang. (2000). Pang-yuan Chi and David Der-wei Wang(Eds.), Chinese Literature in the Second Half of a Modern Century. Bloomington : Indiana University Press.

18 18 “Two interrelated themes, diaspora and nostalgia, prevailed in the anti-Communist fiction of this time. More than 1 million mainlanders, the majority of whom were related to the Nationalist regime politically or economically, escaped to Taiwan in 1949 and the years immediately after. To these émigrés, forced exile was a traumatic experience; their nation had been broken up, families torn apart and familiar value systems turned upside down. (continued) (48)” Source: David Der-wei Wang. (2000). Pang-yuan Chi and David Der-wei Wang(Eds.), Chinese Literature in the Second Half of a Modern Century. Bloomington : Indiana University Press.

19 19 “Looking back across the Taiwan Strait, they felt compelled to write about their past and their lost land. Diaspora indicates a temporary evacuation from a cultural and geographical space that authenticates identity as Chinese, whereas nostalgia suggests an effort to remember and reclaim a lost golden time. Both themes are incorporated into a higher discourse about the re-forming of national history. ” (48) Source: David Der-wei Wang. (2000). Pang-yuan Chi and David Der-wei Wang(Eds.), Chinese Literature in the Second Half of a Modern Century. Bloomington : Indiana University Press.

20 “Hui-an Hostel” Yesterday, I went with Mama to Fu-chao-lou store on Lo-ma-shih Road [ 騾馬市 ]. Mama was going to buy duck egg powder for her face and I loved to eat the eight-flavored preserved plums that were sold there. We came back by way of Lo-ma-shih Road, passing through two other hu-t’ungs to the well house at Ch’un-shu Hu- t’ung [ 椿樹胡同 ], which was diagonally opposite to the hu-t’ung where we lived. As soon as we entered our hu-t’ung I saw the mad girl of Hui-an Hostel. (14) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

21 Hu-t’ung [ 胡同 ] of the Old Peking Wikipedia Ellywa

22 The entry to a courtyard house [ 四合院 ] in a hu-t’ung Wikimedia Snowyowls

23 Geographical Indicators Lo-ma-shih Road [ 騾馬市 ]: just north of Temple of Heaven [ 天壇 ]. Jade Street [ 珠寶市街 ], Lantern Street[ 燈市口 ], Silver Street [ 錢市胡同 ] and Embroidery Street [ 東珠市口 ], etc. Ch’un-shu Hu-t’ung [ 椿樹胡同 ]: not very far from Lo-ma-shih Road. The Ch’i-hua City Gate [ 齊化門/朝陽門 ]: the northeastern side of Peking. Tien-chiao [ 天橋 ]: just east of Temple of Heaven Hsin-lien-tzu Hu-t’ung [ 新簾子胡同 ]: just south of Tiananmen [ 天安門 ].

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25 “Hui-an Hostel” “What’s there to tell about them!” Niu-erh’s lips curled. “In his home during the Ch’ing dynasty when there was an emperor, my pa never had to do any work, just loafed around having a good time. When he lost his home after the fall of the dynasty, he become poor because after spending all his money, he didn’t even know how to work, and could only earn a little by playing his hu-ch’in. He taught me how to sing, hoping that I could quickly learn to sing as well as Pi Yun-hsia and earn as much money as she does.(96) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

26 “Hui-an Hostel” Huh! Hsiao Ying-tzu, now I am going to sing at T’ien-ch’iao. There’s always a whole crowd of people listening but after I finish and pass a small basket around to ask for some money everyone slips away and when I come back, my pa beats me up! He says that those who give money are all your ancestors, you’ve got to show them a smiling face. Just look at that long dour face of yours! Then he beats me with a stick.”(96) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

27 “Hui-an Hostel” (p. 18, 24) “At the very moment, Sung Ma was also peering at Hui-an Hostel when the mother happened to lift her head. Both of them almost simultaneously greeted one another saying, ‘Have you eaten yet?’ Papa said that the people in Peking had nothing to do all day so every time they meet anyone they would ask if they had eaten or not.” (18) “Little southern barbarian!” Hsiu-chen’s mother also began to smile, gently tapping me on the forehead with the tip of her finger. This must be a derogative term, just like the way Papa would often remark to Mama, ”Those northern devils.”(24) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press. Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

28 “Hui-an Hostel” (34) How did Lin Hai-yin try to make her readers sympathize with her stories? How did she arouse a strong feeling of nostalgia?(34) I remember Mama had said that we had come from our homeland far, faraway; an island surrounded by water. We came by a large steamship, then by train before arriving in Peking.(34) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press. Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

29 “Hui-an Hostel” I once asked Mama when we would be going back and she said not for a long time. It was so difficult coming over so we would have to stay for some years. So was the place that Hsiu- chen mentioned as faraway as our island? How could Hsiao Kuei-tzu have gone there all alone? I was sad for Hsiu-chen, also longing for the Hsiao Kuei-tzu whom I didn’t even know. My tears began to fall. My tear-blurred eyes seemed to see that plump baby, riding on the huge red fish, without a single stitch on!(34) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

30 What kind of story is this? A quasi-detective fiction with a 6-year-old female protagonist who tried to solve two mysteries at the same time. Clue 1: Hsiu-chen’s baby had been abandoned at the Chi-hua City Gate. Clue 2: Niu-erh’s family used to live nearby the gate, and her dad and mom were not her natural parents. Clue 3: both Niu-erh and Hsiao Kuei-tzu had a bluish birth mark on the nape, and both Niu-erh and Hsiu- chen had tear dimples. Finally, in her sickness, Ying-tzu was able to figure out that Niu-erh and Hsiao Kuei-tzu were actually the same person. But was she right?

31 “Lan I-niang” ( 蘭姨娘 ) The political background of the story. Might be the 16 th year of ROC, one year before the Northern Expedition [ 北伐 ]. (It should be 1927, since Ying-tzu was 9 years old.) After the Hsin-hai Revolution of 1911, Peking had been ruled by one after another Beiyang warlord [ 北洋軍閥 ]. Ying-tzu the Match-maker. Cf. Emma (1815) by Jane Austen. Did she change? Uncle Te-hsien / Lan I-niang The tone of the story? [The style or manner of expression.] Solemn? Humorous? Sorrowful?

32 Yuan Shih-kai [ 袁世凱 ] ( ) Founder of the Beiyang Army, First President of ROC.

33 Sections I: Uncle Teh-hsien Open with the execution scene took place in front of the Shun-chih Gate [ 順治門 / 宣武門 ], and Ying-tzu’s thought went from the executed student revolutionaries to Uncle Teh-hsien, who had stayed with her family for 6 months. Almost all of the kids disliked Teh-hsien, because, like Ying-tzu said, “he never paid attention to us.... Also his face was too long and he wore a pair of black-rimmed glasses. I didn’t like this kind of face. And then, every time he came, Mama would be in for it.” (202) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

34 Pastimes of the Peking People Hu-fang-ch’iao Road [ 虎坊橋大街 ]. Adults and children gathered before the new department store, listening to a gramophone with a large loudspeaker playing both Peking Opera and “the Laughing Record,” and took their “usual after-dinner airing” (204). Teh-hsien and Lan I-niang’s first “date”: on July 15 th [Chinese Ghost Festival], kids carried lotus flower lantern to see lanterns on display with adults. Visited San P’ei-tzu Park, and went to the movies. Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

35 Sections I: Lan I-niang I would be very happy though, if Lan I-niang could stay with us for a very, very long time. The reason she said that I was going to be a woman principal was because once when I was standing beside a fortune-teller suddenly drew out a fan from inside of his collar at the back of his neck and, pointing it at me, said to the people gathered around waiting to have their fortunes told, ”See ? This little girl will become a woman principle. Her nose is high and straight, and she has a very strong will! Like a man!” These words of Lan I-niang and of the fortune-teller were very pleasant to hear and made me think a lot of myself. [The effect of dramatic irony.] (216) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

36 Sections II: Papa and Lan I-niang “I’m hungry, Mama.” Mama knew nothing about what I had just seen and how deeply I sympathized with her, she just continued scolding me, “What’s the hurry? Going to die after you eat?” She brandished the spatula at me. (220) Mama’s face was set as she pulled at one end of the bolt of silk, crushed a whole of it with a tight fist as if she were strangling someone. When she loosened her hand, the silk slowly spared out, covered with wrinkles. (216) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press. Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

37 Sections III: Teh-hsien and Lan I-niang “Who was that four-eyed dog talking with your papa until the middle of the night?” “Four-eyed dog?” I didn’t understand. Lan I-niang grinned mischievously, used one hand to wipe off the expression from her face, then made two circles with her fingers and placed them against her eyes. “Oh! That person!” “Ah- that’s Uncle Te-hsien.” (224) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

38 The Lotus Lantern Scene “Miss Huang, you seem to be very interested in the traditional folk customs.” Lan I-niang seemed surprised and said in an unnatural manner, asking self-consciously, “Not exactly, just amusing this child! You … how did you know my surname is Huang?” I thought that most probably Lan I-niang had never before been addressed as “Miss Huang.” I knew that only unmarried girl students were called “Miss,” certainly not somebody like Lan I-niang! (230) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

39 I couldn’t help curling my lips as I was filled with resentment, although I was trying with all my heart to drew the two of them together. “I’ve heard Mrs. Lin say that Miss Huang is a very strong willed woman who dares to fight against the evils of environment!” I couldn’t believe that Mama had really ever said this, as she was not capable of using such expressions. That night, I paraded my lantern with Lan I- niang holding tightly to my shoulder as if I were leading a blind man around. ( ) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

40 “Lan I-niang” “Do you want me to tell him ?” “It’s better this way.” Mama didn’t pay any attention to me, just sat there with lowered head as if she were thinking about something and muttering to herself. Then, seeming to remember something, she lifted her head and asked, “What did you say you wanted to buy that day?” “A set of iron rings, a pair of shoes and now I want to add a whole year’s subscription of Children’s World.” I answered without hesitation.(236) Source: Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.), Memories of Peking : South Side stories. Hong Kong : Chinese University Press.

41 Copyright Declaration PageWork LicensingAuthor/Source 2 This work is licensed by 林海音家屬 for the use of “Course Database of General Education TW” ONLY. The copyright belongs to the above mentioned creator and we do not have the authorization right. 5 Wikipedia TIME Magazine /09/24 visited 6 、 24 Wikipedia Kallgan 2013/09/24 visited 7 Wikimedia: Author Unknown 2013/09/24 visited 8 Wikimedia: Author Unknown men_Beijing.jpg 2013/09/24 visited 9 Wikimedia: Author Unknown 2013/09/24 visited

42 Copyright Declaration PageWork LicensingAuthor/Source 9 Wikimedia 孟昭瑞 2013/09/24 visited 10 Wikipedia Peter Morgan from Beijing, China 2013/09/24 visited 17 Insofar as history always involves a narrative … political terms, at least in narrative terms?” David Der-wei Wang. (2000). Reinventing National History: Communist and Anti- Communist Fiction of the Mid-Twentieth Century Pang-yuan Chi and David Der-wei Wang(Eds.) Chinese Literature in the Second Half of a Modern Century (pp. 40). Bloomington : Indiana University Press 18 Two interrelated themes, diaspora and … apart and familiar value systems turned upside down. David Der-wei Wang. (2000). Reinventing National History: Communist and Anti- Communist Fiction of the Mid-Twentieth Century Pang-yuan Chi and David Der-wei Wang(Eds.) Chinese Literature in the Second Half of a Modern Century (pp. 48). Bloomington : Indiana University Press 19 Looking back across the Taiwan Strait, they felt …the re-forming of national history. David Der-wei Wang. (2000). Reinventing National History: Communist and Anti- Communist Fiction of the Mid-Twentieth Century Pang-yuan Chi and David Der-wei Wang(Eds.) Chinese Literature in the Second Half of a Modern Century (pp. 48). Bloomington : Indiana University Press 20 Yesterday, I went with Mama to Fu-chao-lou store on …I saw the mad girl of Hui-an Hostel. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 14). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press

43 Copyright Declaration PageWork LicensingAuthor/Source 21 Wikipedia Ellywa wer_Beijing_august_2007.JPG 2013/09/24 visited 22 Wikimedia Snowyowls 29.jpg 2013/09/24 visited 25 What’s there to tell about them!” Niu-erh’s …Pi Yun-hsia and earn as much money as she does. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 96). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 26 Huh! Hsiao Ying-tzu, now I am going … face of yours! Then he beats me with a stick.” Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 96). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 27 At the very moment, Sung Ma was also … anyone they would ask if they had eaten or not. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 18). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 27 Little southern barbarian!” Hsiu-chen’s … often remark to Mama, ”Those northern devils. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 24). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press

44 Copyright Declaration PageWork LicensingAuthor/Source 28 How did Lin Hai-yin try to make her readers … arouse a strong feeling of nostalgia? Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 34). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 28 I remember Mama had said …steamship, then by train before arriving in Peking. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 34). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 29 I once asked Mama when we would be … on the huge red fish, without a single stitch on! Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 34). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 32 Wikipedia Rio V. De Sieux 2013/09/24 visited 33 Open with the execution scene took place in … then, every time he came, Mama would be in for it. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 202). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 34 Adults and children gathered before the … and took their “usual after-dinner airing Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 204). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press

45 Copyright Declaration PageWork LicensingAuthor/Source 35 I would be very happy though, if Lan I-niang … lot of myself. [The effect of dramatic irony.] Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 216). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 36 Mama’s face was set as she pulled at …silk slowly spared out, covered with wrinkles. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 216). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 36 “I’m hungry, Mama.” Mama knew … hed the spatula at me. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 220). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 37 Who was that four-eyed dog … “Ah- that’s Uncle Te-hsien. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 224). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 38 “ Miss Huang, you seem to be …certainly not somebody like Lan I- niang! Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 230). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press 39 I couldn’t help curling my lips as I was … if I were leading a blind man around. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp ). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press

46 Copyright Declaration PageWork LicensingAuthor/Source 40 “Do you want me to tell him ?”“It’s … World.” I answered without hesitation. Lin Hai-yin. (1992). Ch‘engnan chiushih Nancy C. Ing and Chi Pang-Yuan(Eds.) Memories of Peking : South Side stories (pp. 236). Hong Kong : Chinese University Press


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