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Unit 6 Week 7 February 10, 2014 Please sit in teams and copy agenda/homework 1.Literature Circles check in and response 2.Literature circle discussion.

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Presentation on theme: "Unit 6 Week 7 February 10, 2014 Please sit in teams and copy agenda/homework 1.Literature Circles check in and response 2.Literature circle discussion."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit 6 Week 7 February 10, 2014 Please sit in teams and copy agenda/homework 1.Literature Circles check in and response 2.Literature circle discussion 3.Quizzypoo chapter 2 Weds 4.Complete chap 2 part 2 for Thursday 5. Read Love In The Time Of Cholera chapter 3 lit circle Tuesday 2/18 6. Read Love In The Time of Cholera chapter 4 lit circle Thursday 2/20

2 Complete each following items in your literature circle with your team members: A. Arrange your chairs in a tight four square grouping to facilitate attention. B. Choose an order for sharing and be sure that every individual has the time to share. No computer or other coursework distractions are permitted. C. Please be prepared to share with the large group.

3 Please clearly label all of your assignments and put your name on all of your assignments. When you are finished put your assignments in the team folder, and rearrange your desks. Now use the remainder of class to complete chapter 2 reading and literature circle assignments due chapter 2 due Thursday 2/13.

4 Literature Circle Roles Chapter 2 Discussion Director: Your job is to write a list of questions, and answers for your group to discuss about this part of the novel. The best questions will come from your own thoughts, feelings, and ideas about this section of the novel. Please make them under the surface questions. Please record the page numbers and examples. Summarizer: Your job is to write and share a summation of the reading assigned. Do not retell the whole story, just focus on the important parts. The other members of your group will be counting on you to give them a quick statement that summarizes and highlights the key points. Please record the page numbers and examples. Vocabulary Enricher: Your job is to look for important words in your assigned reading. When you find words that are puzzling or unfamiliar look them up in a dictionary and write down their definitions. You may also find words in the reading that are significant to the story. Mark these words too, and be ready to point them out to the group. When your circle meets, help members find and discuss the words. Please record the page numbers and vocabulary definitions. Character Analyzer: Your job is to choose a paragraph or sentences from the assigned reading to discuss with your group. Your purpose is to spotlight something interesting, powerful, funny, puzzling, or important that happens to the main characters. It is important to read parts aloud yourself, or ask another group member to read them. Write your reasons for picking the paragraphs or sections. Please record the page numbers and examples. Wildlife Biologist: Your job is to research and print examples of the wildlife of Colombia. It is important for everyone in your group to see pictures and know what types of animals populate the differing landscapes. Moreover it is important to understand how the wildlife might affect the main characters. Please record the page numbers and examples. Medical Advisor: Your job is research infectious diseases that plague Colombia. Research current infectious disease outbreaks in Colombia and see how people and the government deal with the outbreaks. Please record the page numbers and examples. Botanist: Your job is to research and print examples of the plants and flowers of Colombia. It is important for everyone in your group to see pictures and know what types of plants and flowers are native to the differing landscapes. Moreover it is important to understand how the plants and flowers might affect the main characters. Please record the page numbers and examples. Music Engineer: Your job is to choose songs, and print out the lyrics for each of the chapters we have so far explored. In a novel that is filled with interesting events and characters you should be able to find songs that represent the characters and events. Describe how each song represents the characters and events with your group. Please record the page numbers and examples.

5 Literature Circles Instructions Literature circles are an opportunity for you to approach the novel in a variety of ways with the support of a team. Therefore it is imperative that you complete the reading before the due date and complete the assignments on time. Please use this form to log your daily reading assignments and the roles you must fulfill. On the reverse you will find a description of each role for Chapter 1. Notice that each role has specific requirements, evidence and page numbers from the novel. There are eight roles and you may not repeat a role within a chapter. Date: 2/3/14 Reading Assigned: Chapter Lit Circle Role:______________________ Date: 2/6/14 Reading Assigned: Chapter Lit Circle Role:______________________ Date: 2/10/14 Reading Assigned: Chapter Lit Circle Role:________________________ Date: 2/13/14 Reading Assigned: Chapter Lit Circle Role:________________________ Reading Schedule for remainder of novel. You will receive new roles for chapter 3-4: Date: 2/18/14 Chapter 3 All of it chose two roles and both are due same day Date: 2/20/14 Chapter 4 All of it chose two roles and both are due same day Reading Schedule for remainder of novel. You will receive new roles for chapter 5-6: 2/24/14 Chapter 5 All of it /27/14 Chapter 6 All of it /3/14 Friday In class essay

6 Unit 6 Week 7 February 11, 2014 Please sit in teams and copy agenda/homework Annotated Bib due 2/12!!!!! 1.Read chapter 2 quizzypoo on Weds and for lit circle due 2/13 2.Visit from Officer McGuire 3. Read chapter 3 and complete lit circles due 2/18 4. Read chapter 4 and complete lit circles due 2/20 5. Pass back a thin

7 Unit 6 Week 7 February 12, 2014 Please sit in teams and copy agenda/homework 1.Annotated Bib unit 6 2.Quizzypoo chapter 2 3. Prepare lit circle due 2/13 4. Read chapter 3 and complete lit circles due 2/18 5. Read chapter 4 and complete lit circles due 2/20

8 Unit 6 Week 7 February 13, 2014 Please sit in teams and copy agenda/homework 1.Lit circle check in 2.Literature Circles 3.History of Valentines 4.Slides for chapter 2 5. Read chapter 3 and complete lit circles due 2/18 6. Read chapter 4 and complete lit circles due 2/20 7. Review Merengue 8. Let’s learn Bachata

9 The Legend of St. Valentine The history of Valentine's Day--and the story of its patron saint--is shrouded in mystery. We do know that February has long been celebrated as a month of romance, and that St. Valentine's Day, as we know it today, contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition. But who was Saint Valentine, and how did he become associated with this ancient rite? The Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all of whom were martyred. One legend contends that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. When Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine's actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. Other stories suggest that Valentine may have been killed for attempting to help Christians escape harsh Roman prisons, where they were often beaten and tortured. According to one legend, an imprisoned Valentine actually sent the first "valentine" greeting himself after he fell in love with a young girl--possibly his jailor's daughter-- who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, it is alleged that he wrote her a letter signed "From your Valentine," an expression that is still in use today. Although the truth behind the Valentine legends is murky, the stories all emphasize his appeal as a sympathetic, heroic and--most importantly--romantic figure. By the Middle Ages, perhaps thanks to this reputation, Valentine would become one of the most popular saints in England and France.Middle Ages

10 Origins of Valentine's Day: A Pagan Festival in February While some believe that Valentine's Day is celebrated in the middle of February to commemorate the anniversary of Valentine's death or burial-- which probably occurred around A.D others claim that the Christian church may have decided to place St. Valentine's feast day in the middle of February in an effort to "Christianize" the pagan celebration of Lupercalia. Celebrated at the ides of February, or February 15, Lupercalia was a fertility festival dedicated to Faunus, the Roman god of agriculture, as well as to the Roman founders Romulus and Remus. To begin the festival, members of the Luperci, an order of Roman priests, would gather at a sacred cave where the infants Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome, were believed to have been cared for by a she-wolf or lupa. The priests would sacrifice a goat, for fertility, and a dog, for purification. They would then strip the goat's hide into strips, dip them into the sacrificial blood and take to the streets, gently slapping both women and crop fields with the goat hide. Far from being fearful, Roman women welcomed the touch of the hides because it was believed to make them more fertile in the coming year. Later in the day, according to legend, all the young women in the city would place their names in a big urn. The city's bachelors would each choose a name and become paired for the year with his chosen woman. These matches often ended in marriage.

11 Valentine's Day: A Day of Romance Lupercalia survived the initial rise of Christianity and but was outlawed—as it was deemed “un-Christian”--at the end of the 5th century, when Pope Gelasius declared February 14 St. Valentine's Day. It was not until much later, however, that the day became definitively associated with love. During the Middle Ages, it was commonly believed in France and England that February 14 was the beginning of birds' mating season, which added to the idea that the middle of Valentine's Day should be a day for romance. Valentine greetings were popular as far back as the Middle Ages, though written Valentine's didn't begin to appear until after The oldest known valentine still in existence today was a poem written in 1415 by Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt. (The greeting is now part of the manuscript collection of the British Library in London, England.) Several years later, it is believed that King Henry V hired a writer named John Lydgate to compose a valentine note to Catherine of Valois.

12 Typical Valentine's Day Greetings In addition to the United States, Valentine's Day is celebrated in Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, France and Australia. In Great Britain, Valentine's Day began to be popularly celebrated around the 17th century. By the middle of the 18th, it was common for friends and lovers of all social classes to exchange small tokens of affection or handwritten notes, and by 1900 printed cards began to replace written letters due to improvements in printing technology. Ready-made cards were an easy way for people to express their emotions in a time when direct expression of one's feelings was discouraged. Cheaper postage rates also contributed to an increase in the popularity of sending Valentine's Day greetings. Americans probably began exchanging hand-made valentines in the early 1700s. In the 1840s, Esther A. Howland began selling the first mass- produced valentines in America. Howland, known as the “Mother of the Valentine,” made elaborate creations with real lace, ribbons and colorful pictures known as "scrap." Today, according to the Greeting Card Association, an estimated 1 billion Valentine’s Day cards are sent each year, making Valentine's Day the second largest card-sending holiday of the year. (An estimated 2.6 billion cards are sent for Christmas.) Women purchase approximately 85 percent of all valentines.United States MexicoChristmas

13 Complete each following items in your literature circle with your team members: A. Arrange your chairs in a tight four square grouping to facilitate attention. B. Choose an order for sharing and be sure that every individual has the time to share. No computer or other coursework distractions are permitted. C. Please be prepared to share with the large group.

14 Please clearly label all of your assignments and put your name on all of your assignments. When you are finished put your assignments in the team folder, and rearrange your desks. Now use the remainder of class to review your two roles for chapter 3 literature circle assignments due

15 Chapter 2 page The second part of Love in the Time of Cholera describes how Florentino Ariza and Fermina Daza met and loved each other for four years. Florentino is the bastard son of a successful shipowner, Don Pius V Loayza, who died when Florentino was only ten, leaving him without support. Florentino thus had to leave school, and he worked in the Postal Agency, where he met Lotario Thugut. Lotario taught him how to play the violin, how to work a telegraph machine, and about prostitutes. Florentino is the most desired by the girls of his circle, but he does not care deeply for any of them until he delivers a telegram to Lorenzi Daza’ house, where he sees Fermina Daza for the first time. Florentino immediately falls inlove with her, age thirteen and cared for by her aunt, Escolastica Daza, because her mother died long ago. Florentino learns that they are rich although Lorenzo Daza’s profession is unknown. Florentino soon learns that Lorenzo Daza has a strict regime for his daughter, which makes it impossible for Florentino to see her alone.

16 He satisfies himself with following her and watching her as much as he can. Florentino finally cannot bear to keep his secret any longer, so he tells his mother. Escolastica already realizes that Florentino is in love with her neice- and has told Fermina. Although Fermina at first feels no curiosity about love, she gradually finds herself fascinated by the love sick-looking boy always following her, and her aunt encourages her interest, teaching her the sign language to use in forbidden love. She waits impatiently for a letter from him, but it takes him almost a year to build the courage to give her one. Meanwhile he follows her at Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve, and after coming close enough to touch her, he falls sick anew with delirious love. One day he sees that during her lessons, her aunt has gone inside intentionally to give him an opportunity to approach Fermina. He asks for the opportunity to give her a letter, and she allows it. As Florentino waits for Fermina’s response to his letter, he falls physically ill with love- to the point that his mother fears he has cholera. His mother encourages him to enjoy his suffering, which is just what he wants, but his work becomes so atrocious that he almost loses his job.

17 Lotario takes him to the transient hotel for sailors that he frequents, but Florentino has no interest in losing his virginity to anyone but Fermina. Instead, he eats gardenias and drinks perfume to try and taste Fermina. After a month his mother berates him for his passivity, so he returns to Femina to ask for her response. She becomes almost panicked with the idea of responding and fear of her father’s suspicions, so she tells Florentino the truth-that she did not know how to respond. He cajoles her to promise to write him back by the end of her vacation. Escolastica finally brings him Fermina’s response, and Florentino is delirious with joy. In the three months that follow, not a day passes that they do not write to each other, and they fall into devastating love although they will not have another chance to see each other alone until Juvenal Urbino dies over fifty years later. Florentino’s letters become more passionate and delirious. Fermina, who has much less opportunity to write and is more reticent, writes terser and more matter-of-fact letters in response.

18 Symbol/motif A Camellia Flower In many of his letters, Florentino sends Fermina a white camellia, the "flower of promise," a gesture which represents his undying love for her. In Chapter 2, Fermina refuses the first camellia Florentino gives her from his lapel, and returns the subsequent camellias he sends her. In her refusal to accept the camellias, Fermina rejects any commitment to Florentino and his offering of love. She does not want to be bound to him, and by refusing the "flowers of promise," not only does she resist any obligation to her lover, but, as she understands it, helps to curb any thoughts of marriage that Florentino may have. Florentino composes a waltz for Fermina called “The Crowned Goddess” and serenades her with it repeatedly from just within earshot so that her father will not suspect anything. After almost two years of correspondence, Florentino formally proposes marriage in a letter. His marriage proposal comes as a complete shock, and leaves her panic-stricken, for she is not yet mature enough to undertake such an immense responsibility as marriage. After four months she finally accepts.

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20 Transito Ariza and Florentino work on preparing the practical side of the marriage. Transito starts renovating their home with her savings, and Florentino secures a promotion in the Postal Agency. The engagement is set to last two years and to remain secret. Florentino starts to spend more and more time at the transient hotel where he is given a room, not for prostitution but to satisfy his insatiable appetite for reading sentimental love poetry. His love for Fermina is such that he is never tempted to stay, even when one of the hotel workers comes on to him strongly. Four months before the date set to formalize their engagement one of Fermina’s teachers catches her writing a love letter and she is expelled, and her father informed. Lorenzo immediately sends Aunt Escolastica away because she helped Fermina with the deception, and then he goes to confront Florentino. Lorenzo Daza tells Florentino that his one goal in life is to make Fermina a lady and that he is not part of the plan. Florentino refuses to back down and Lorenzo takes her on a long journey to make her forget.

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22 The journey is difficult and dangerous, but once they make it to the home of Fermina’s cousin Uncle Lisimaco Sanchez, her cousin Hildebranda gives her a letter that came for Fermina from Florentino. They are able to keep in touch throughout the year and a half separation. While she is away, Florentino decides to salvage a shipwrecked treasure so that he can shower her with gold. He finds a young talented swimmer, Euclides, to accompany him and dive for treasure, and after a few weeks they begin to find treasure. Florentino eventually shows the treasure to his mother but she tells him that Euclides has been scamming him.

23 Lorenzo finally brings Fermina back home, but on the day of her arrival there is such a heavy downpour and she is so soaked that Florentino does not recognize her, thinking she has not returned. Lorenzo gives Fermina the role of housekeeper, and she revels in the new responsibility. Florentino realizes that she has returned, and while trying to figure out how to approach her, he sees her shopping with Gala Placidia. He follows her while she shops, finally speaking to her from right behind her. As soon as she sees him she feels utterly disenchanted. That afternoon she sends Gala with a note ending their engagement, returning all his letters and keepsakes, and asking for hers in return.

24 Literature Circle Roles Chapter 3 Discussion Director: Your job is to write a list of questions, and answers for your group to discuss about this part of the novel. The best questions will come from your own thoughts, feelings, and ideas about this section of the novel. Please make them under the surface questions. Please record the page numbers and examples. Summarizer: Your job is to write and share a summation of the reading assigned. Do not retell the whole story, just focus on the important parts. The other members of your group will be counting on you to give them a quick statement that summarizes and highlights the key points. Please record the page numbers and examples. Vocabulary Enricher: Your job is to look for important words in your assigned reading. When you find words that are puzzling or unfamiliar look them up in a dictionary and write down their definitions. You may also find words in the reading that are significant to the story. Mark these words too, and be ready to point them out to the group. When your circle meets, help members find and discuss the words. Please record the page numbers and vocabulary definitions. Character Analyzer: Your job is to choose a paragraph or sentences from the assigned reading to discuss with your group. Your purpose is to spotlight something interesting, powerful, funny, puzzling, or important that happens to the main characters. It is Culinary important to read parts aloud yourself, or ask another group member to read them. Write your reasons for picking the paragraphs or sections. Please record the page numbers and examples. Graphic Designer: Your job is to choose one scene from the current pages that you found particularly interesting and complete a story board of three cells that illustrates the scene. Please record the page numbers and examples. Culinary Specialist: Your job is to discover and print out a list of the typical food or national cuisine for Colombia. Please gather a list of national or typical fruits, vegetables, meats and spices are particular to Colombia? Please record the page numbers and examples. Artistic Ambassador: Your job is to research 1 famous artist and musician from Colombia either currently or historically. Be sure to print out biographical information and pictures or both. Architect: Your job is to download period buildings from Colombia for your team members. Please include a public building, a church, an open space such as a park and two different types of residences. Please record the page numbers and examples.

25 Literature Circles Instructions Literature circles are an opportunity for you to approach the novel in a variety of ways with the support of a team. Therefore it is imperative that you complete the reading before the due date and complete the assignments on time. Please use this form to log your daily reading assignments and the roles you must fulfill. On the reverse you will find a description of each role for Chapter 3. Notice that each role has specific requirements, evidence and page numbers from the novel. There are eight roles and you may not repeat a role within a chapter. Please fill out your folder and indicate what role each member is completing for both parts of Chapter 3. Reading Schedule for remainder of novel. You will receive new roles for chapter 3-4: Date: 2/18/14 Chapter 3 All of it chose two roles and both are due same day Date: 2/20/14 Chapter 4 All of it chose two roles and both are due same day Reading Schedule for remainder of novel. You will receive new roles for chapter 5-6: 2/24/14 Chapter 5 All of it /27/14 Chapter 6 All of it /3/14 Friday In class essay

26 Bachata is a dance from the Dominican Republic in the Caribbean islands. Both the music and the dance have been influenced by Cuban Bolero, the Merengue (also of Dominican Republic origin), Salsa and Cumbia. Bachata Moves and Steps Bachata music has four beats per measure. In Bachata dancing, the dancer takes three steps to four beats of music. As with Salsa, the step timing is three steps and then a one-beat pause. The knees are flexed on the steps. Given its humble origins, the steps are flat footed. The chasse basic is three steps in one direction (side-close-side-tap or touch) and the same pattern in the other direction. Nightclub dancers add a lift or hip motion on the tap/touch step. The timing if called out sounds like "one, two, three, uh; one, two, three, uh." The walking basic is similar, with the dancers walking forward and back rather than side to side. Styles of Bachata Embrace Bachata is danced solo, in two-hand hold, open embrace and close embrace. In social parties and dances, the first three are quite common, while in night clubs, close embrace is the vogue. two hand holdopen embraceclose embrace Embellishments Embellishments with the free foot on the fourth beat have become a defining feature of Bachata, especially in night club dancing. The chasse basic in Bachata is three steps to the left or right and then three steps in the other direction. After the third step in the chasse, the dancer can tap or touch the free foot, raise the foot, wrap the foot around the partner's leg or attempt a wide variety of embellishments. The leg action is accompanied by a hip action to one side or a shake. These embellishments are best understood by viewing the videos. Music History and Classic Bachata José Manuel CalderónWhile Luis Segura is widely acclaimed as "the father of Bachata", José Manuel Calderón is credited with recording the first Bachata songs on May 30th, 1962, in the studios of Radiotelevisión Dominicana (Borracho de amor and Condena). These early recording will hardly be recognized as Bachata today. They were heavily influenced by Cuban Bolero such as Verdadero amor. Indeed, the music was not called Bachata. It was called Bolero Campesino. It was played using an acoustic guitar and was slower than the Bachata of today. Cuban Bolero is a Latin version of Blues replete with themes like deception and lost love. One of Calderón's songs, Boracho de amor, even has a waltz rhythm. In 1967, Calderón travelled to the US. When he returned to the Dominican Republic in 1972, he found that Bachata music had gained ill repute and had become associated with prostitution. Bachata had also become stigmatized and marginalized as music for the poorer classes. Only one nationwide radio station, Radio Guarachita, played the music. Popular Music Gradually, Bachata evolved in style and popularity, It burst on the international stage in 1992, when Juan Luis Guerra won a Grammy for his album Bachata Rosa. Suddenly Bachata regained its lost legitimacy. However, since the Calderón days, the music had become faster and incorporated electronic sounds. Internationally, one of the most popular Bachata singles is Obsesion played by the Dominican group Aventura. Locally, popular Bachata performers are Antony Santos & Luis Vargas. Other notables include Raulin Rodriguez, Zacarias Ferreira, Frank Reyes, Monchy y Alexandra, Domenic Marte, Xtreme, Andy Andy, Leonardo Paniagua, Los Toros Band, and Joe Veras.

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