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A Transport Workers’ Perspective on Indigenous Transport and Climate Change Adaptation Alicia Ames School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management.

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Presentation on theme: "A Transport Workers’ Perspective on Indigenous Transport and Climate Change Adaptation Alicia Ames School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management."— Presentation transcript:

1 A Transport Workers’ Perspective on Indigenous Transport and Climate Change Adaptation Alicia Ames School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management The University of Queensland, Australia Iderlina B. Mateo-Babiano, PhD School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management The University of Queensland, Australia Yusak O. Susilo, PhD Department of Transport Science School of Architecture and the Built Environment KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

2 Presentation Overview Background on indigenous transport and the current state of research Data and methodology Results of descriptive analyses and independent samples T-Test Summary of the key results Potential for further studies

3 Background: Defining indigenous transport Integral component of the urban transport system in developing cities. Offers benefits to users and drivers/operators, however also criticized. Defined as modes developed by locals in response to local demand and is contextualized by local conditions and cultures.

4 The formal and informal landscape Formal transport Informal transport Indigenous transport

5 Current state of research Need for stronger empirical base, rather than anecdotal evidence. Limited research on transport workers’ livelihoods and understanding transport workers’ circumstances, their service operations and labour conditions. Transport workers’ perception on the role of indigenous transport in increasing the adaptive capacity of cities has not been examined.

6 Data and Methodology Survey-based research design Responses elicited from drivers of indigenous transport modes 113 drivers in Bandung City sample 100 drivers in Ho Chi Minh City sample Results collated using SPSS Generated descriptive tests for all variables Assessed whether the means of the two samples were statistically different using the T-Test

7 Findings Difference in urban scales influenced the niche market indigenous transport modes had evolved to fill. Minibuses (angkot) more popular in Bandung, Indonesia and motorcycle taxis (xe om) more popular in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The operational characteristics for the indigenous transport modes in each study site responded to the needs of the local population.

8 Operational characteristic of indigenous transport modes CharacteristicBandungHCMC Mean fuel consumption litres/day 6.48 kilometres/litre 1.81 litres/day kilometres/litre Mean load factor Mean number of working hrs/day Mean number of working days Mean operation start time Mean operation end time Mean number of drivers/vehicle

9 Respondents’ perceptions of the attributes of indigenous transport modes AttributesBandung (mean)HCMC (mean) T-Test for Equality of Means Sig. (2-tailed) Convenient Door-to-door service Accessible Fast Reliable Affordable/cheap Environment-friendly Better connection O-D Provision for heavy goods Flexible Safe Variable fare system Informal nature

10 Summary of key results Indigenous transport modes had evolved to fit a niche market in both study sites – minibuses (angkot) in Bandung and motorcycle taxis (xe om) in Ho Chi Minh City. Divergent demographic and geographic characteristics in the study sites influenced the transport workers’ highly contextualised experiences and perceptions on indigenous transport. Drivers agreed indigenous transport provides a number of benefits, but operating conditions were indicative of the regulatory status of indigenous transport modes and contributed to drivers’ increasing vulnerability. The concept of climate change and climate adaptation is still not clearly understood by transport workers. Respondents concurred indigenous transport had a potential role for increasing the adaptive capacity of individuals and communities.

11 Potential for further studies Need for further studies to ascertain the potential role of indigenous transport in climate adaptation. Replication of this study around the world could garner a stronger empirical base of how these modes operate in the formal and/or informal landscape. Investigate the need for a more comprehensive analysis so as to result in more targeted policy.

12 Conclusion Offered an alternative perspective to the informal transport discourse. A better understanding of transport workers’ attributes and views is the first step in lessening vulnerabilities and can serve as powerful climate adaptation leverage. This understanding will potentially inform policies on enhancing adaptive actions and thereby, allow for better adaptation strategy design.


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