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BY: KELLIE TROUTEN & GERDA KUMPIENE EDEX 619 FALL 2010 DR. PLOTNER Transition to Independent and Residential Living.

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Presentation on theme: "BY: KELLIE TROUTEN & GERDA KUMPIENE EDEX 619 FALL 2010 DR. PLOTNER Transition to Independent and Residential Living."— Presentation transcript:

1 BY: KELLIE TROUTEN & GERDA KUMPIENE EDEX 619 FALL 2010 DR. PLOTNER Transition to Independent and Residential Living

2 Overview of Contents Philosophical Basis Changes in Living Settings Living Settings Choice of Living Arrangements Living Our Dreams Video Transition – Legal Requirements Independent Living Movement

3 Philosophical Basis Transition to employment and independent living is a process that is not limited to the final years of high school. Transition prepares people for social integration, employment, and community living by developing the skills to plan, manage finances, and maintain relationships. Although independent living is a pattern for social interaction, it is also a concept that is tied historically to the normalization principle. The normalization principle is a philosophic assumption that people with disabilities should, to the extent possible, be integrated into the main-stream of community life ₁

4 Changes in Living Settings Since the late sixties, the proportion of persons with developmental disabilities in public residential facilities has progressively decreased. ₁ Between 1988 and 2008, the number of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities living in residential settings with 6 or fewer residents increased from 78,173 to 321,025 (311%). ₁ State governments increased funding for alternative, community-based facilities such as group homes, supervised apartments, foster care, and independent living. ₂ Although a survey of 13,000 people with developmental disabilities indicated that only 18 percent of those questioned owned or leased their own home, community-based living arrangements were preferred overwhelmingly by persons with developmental disabilities. ₂

5 Living Settings ₁ Type of ResidenceFeatures Public Residential Facilities institutionalized facilities trained staff full-time supervision for residents residents are segregated from the community Sheltered Villages institutionalized facilities trained staff full-time supervision for residents privately supported are often located in rural areas residents are segregated from the community Public Community Facilities (Intermediate Care Facilities) institutionalized facilities trained staff full-time supervision for residents residents are segregated from the community for some activities but integrated for other activities

6 Living Settings (cont.) ₁ Type of ResidenceFeatures Public Group Homes government operated homes shared by groups of persons staff may be part-time residents may be segregated from the community for some activities but integrated for other activities Private Group Homes privately operated homes that otherwise have the same characteristics as public group homes Cooperatively Owned Group Homes homes that are owned jointly by residents full-time or part-time staff may be employed residents may be segregated from the community for some activities but integrated for other activities

7 Living Settings (cont.) ₁ Type of ResidenceFeatures Foster Care persons with disabilities live in the home and under the supervision of a caregiver the caregiver may be paid a stipend for these services degree to which residents are integrated can vary according to the attitudes of caregivers Publicly Managed Supervised Apartments government operated apartments that are leased to individuals persons are supervised or assisted by an apartment manager who may be part -time residents may be segregated from the community for some activities but integrated for other activities Privately Managed Supervised Apartments privately managed apartments that have the same characteristics as publicly managed, supervised apartments

8 Living Settings (cont.) ₁ Type of ResidenceFeatures Cooperatively Owned Supervised Apartments cooperatively owned apartments or condominums that are leased to individuals has the same characteristics as publicly or privately owned supervised apartments Independent Living a wide range of residential options that could include renting or purchasing a residence in ways similar to those by which residences are selected and maintained by persons without disabilities persons with disabilities would have unrestricted access to community activities and could request assistance from agency personnel as appropriate

9 Choice of Living Arrangements ₃ The 2008 study data show that rights to choose where and with whom to live are widely endorsed but commonly denied to adults with intellectual disabilities. Participants of the study adult service users living in non-family- home service settings in 26 US states participating in the NCI program. Those with more support needs because of more severe ID and/or co- occurring conditions experienced less choice regarding living arrangements. Individuals living in their own home or an agency-operated apartment were more likely to choose where and with whom to live than individuals in nursing homes, institutions or group homes.

10 Living Our Dreams Video A video with real people and an overview of their living situations which include home sharing, roommate, home ownership and condo clusters. This video was put out by the CLBC (Community Living British Columbia), an organization who promote the decision of living situations by those with disabilities. YouTube - 1 – Living Our Dreams: Introduction

11 Transition – Legal Requirements By law, during the IEP process transition services must be included. Transition services are a coordinated set of activities to help a student get from school to post-school activities which include independent living and community involvement. The IEP meeting must include someone from the public agency to provide services after school. Bateman, Barbara, Ph.D., J.D. (1995) “Writing Individual Education Programs (IEP’s) for Success.” Secondary Education and Beyond. 14 November 2010

12 Independent Living Movement Consists of inclusion and citizenship. Combined housing and personal assistance is said to help in the transition phase to independent living. For those who can make a choice of where they want to live, integration with the wider community is preferred. Housing association properties can be seen as useful because of their ability to help move toward independence by establishing independent living and helping them to move on to paid employment. Hendey, Nicola & Pascall, Gillian. (2001) Disability and Transition to Adulthood Achieving Independent Living. Pavilion Publishing/Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

13 Independent Living Movement (cont.) Owner occupation is the most independent group with more choice and control over suitability helping extend citizenship. It is just as important for disabled young adults to have their own place as it is for their non-disabled peers. Disabled children and young adults are more likely to be protected by parents and less likely to have the independence needed to live away from home. Young adults with disabilities use social housing as a resource. Hendey, Nicola & Pascall, Gillian. (2001) Disability and Transition to Adulthood Achieving Independent Living. Pavilion Publishing/Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

14 Living Independently Model “These service specifications have been developed for funded non-government service providers to assist in the implementation of the Living Independently Model developed under the Younger People in Residential Aged Care initiative.” Aimed to enable younger disabled people who are living in a residential aged care or are at risk for entering aged care, to access therapy and health care to meet their individual needs and enable them to live alone in their own home or independently. Provides necessary personal care and household management support to people with disabilities. Queensland Government Disability Services. (2007) Younger People in Residential Aged Care Initiative Living Independently Model. Disability Services Queensland.

15 Living Independently Model (cont.) Objectives of the Living Independently Model  Provide appropriate disability, personal care, household management, therapy and health care support  develop innovative and realistic long term arrangements to enable people to live on their own  provide high quality support that is age and culturally appropriate  strengthen the relationship and capacity of the individual, their family and/or informal support networks  increase the individual’s participation and access in the community Queensland Government Disability Services. (2007) Younger People in Residential Aged Care Initiative Living Independently Model. Disability Services Queensland.

16 Living Independently Model (cont.) People supported in this model include people who are disabled living in residential aged care to those who only need to improve their independent living skills that they are currently practicing.  Support needs may fluctuate during the individuals needs during their time in this model Support components of model  Personal care and disability support  Nursing and therapy support  Aids and equipment  Consumable supplies Queensland Government Disability Services. (2007) Younger People in Residential Aged Care Initiative Living Independently Model. Disability Services Queensland.

17 References Bateman, Barbara, Ph.D., J.D. (1995) “Writing Individual Education Programs (IEP’s) for Success.” Secondary Education and Beyond. 14 November Hendey, Nicola & Pascall, Gillian. (2001). Disability and Transition to Adulthood Achieving Independent Living. Pavilion Publishing/Joseph Rowntree Foundation. Queensland Government Disability Services. (2007) Younger People in Residential Aged Care Initiative Living Independently Model. Disability Services Queensland.


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