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Enabling Openness at USQ Presenters: David Bull and Kate Judith University of Southern Queensland.

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Presentation on theme: "Enabling Openness at USQ Presenters: David Bull and Kate Judith University of Southern Queensland."— Presentation transcript:

1 Enabling Openness at USQ Presenters: David Bull and Kate Judith University of Southern Queensland

2 USQ’s OER History 2007 – USQ joins the Open Course Ware (OCW) Consortium USQ joined newly formed OER Foundation in OER University – USQ became a founding anchor partner y:_Free_learning_for_all_students_worldwide y:_Free_learning_for_all_students_worldwide ALTC Project – Developing an OER Feasibility Protocol for Australian Higher Education (partner with UNE and Massey)

3 USQ OER Activities in Progress ‘Making the Connections’ - internet independent delivery of an OER based undergraduate program (Dr Helen Farley) OERu course offering OER1001: Regional Relations in Asia and the Pacific – conversion to 4 micro courses (Dr Marcus Harmes) OER resources for RUN Maths and Science Digital Classroom (Professor Mike Keppell) USQ’s first MOOC – OPE1000: Introduction to OER – micro courses for professional development (Adrian Stagg) Addressing the challenges of OER implementation – case study action research (Kate Judith)

4 Social Science Research Methods Brent Gibbs & Gruszczynska 2012Uni. S. PacificKoroivulaono2014 Open Uni. Netherlands Schwuwer & Mulder 2009NPTEL IndiaHarishankar2012 UN UniversityBarrett et al2009Connexions at RiceSchmidt-Jones2012 AgShare: OER Africa and Michigan State Uni Levey2012Virtual Uni. Small States of the Commonwealth West & Daniel Lesperance Open Uni. UKLane Gourley & Lane Teacher education Asia e University Philips2012 Johns Hopkins School of Public Health (JHSPH) Kanchanaraksa et al 2009Ghana Health ServicesOmollo, Rahman & Yebuah 2012 Uni. Western Cape Keats2009S.Africa Higher Education Institutions Lesko2013 Thompson RiversFriesen & Murray 2011TESSAWolfenden2012 AthabascaIves & Pringle2013S.Africa Maths teacher education Sapire, Reed & Welch 2012 British ColumbiaLalonde2014Commonwealth of Independent States & the Baltic States Bardach et al2012 The case studies

5 Additional sources of case studies Armellini A & Nie M 2014 ‘Open educational practices for curriculum enhancement’ Open Learning: The Journal of Open, Distance and e- Learning, vol. 28 no.1, pp Mawoyo M & Butcher N 2012 ‘Sharing Existing Teaching Materials as OER: Key Considerations from Practice’ Glennie et al. Open Educational Resources and Change in Higher Education: Reflections from Practice Ch. 12 pp White D & Manton M 2011 JISC-funded OER Impact Study, University of Oxford

6 Identifying the challenges Contextual Suitability Copyright Discoverability Knowledge ‘For teaching staff, the subject relevance and pedagogical ‘fit’ of a resource to their teaching strategy was the key factor.’ (White & Manton, 2011) by epublicist

7 Individual approaches Learning clever search strategies (Agshare) Limiting search to more reliable sources Using help guides (Agshare) Taking a cautious approach to copyright (UN Uni., Nottingham, Leicester) Using url links only (Athabasca) Providing OERs as ‘independent’ extra resources (JISC) Adding richness/enhancement

8 Structural support approaches Boot camps on OER use for subject specialists (VUSSC) Making the use of OERs simpler – providing repository of images, charts and graphs set up for easy access (JHSPH) OER Library and information technology specialists Providing compilations of examples, resources and tools to assist (Uni. Michigan) Recognising the need for pedagogical metalanguage

9 Institutional approaches Teams of experts including copyright expert working alongside content developers and reusers (OU UK) Institutional structures and communication to get the right resource into the right place (Athabasca) Taking an institutional response to building knowledge: appropriate PD, specialist expertise (OU UK) Designing OERs with flexible reuse in mind (TESSA) Templates for consistency, two knowledge areas, one generic, one for local context

10 Collaborative approaches Collaborative communities, blogs and reviews Teams collaborating to share OER knowledge (S. African Mathematics Teacher Education) Teachers sharing their created content and assisting each other in adapting it (CoP style)(CIS & BS) Students providing information about suitability back to course developers (Armellini & Nie)

11 Network or user-shaped approaches Disaggregating OERs into Learning Objects (LOs) (many case studies) A response to user behaviour User delimits search, setting the quality/suitability standards (Connexions) Offloading searching to students (AgShare) Multi-user development platforms (Athabasca, OU UK) Crowd sourced quality control (Ossiannilsson & Creelman 2012)

12 Appraising Strategies Greater control Structure provides security Loss of innovation potential Standards used to maintain effectiveness Strict peer review processes Standardised templates Peer collaboration approaches CoPs Blogs/ /Delicious Discipline based repositories Institutional commitment and vision extensive resources high stakes collaboration within institution Active student involvement Student searches Collaboration in development platforms Students delimit their own search requirements User decisions shape processes Networks disperse responsibility Crowd sourced quality control Higher risk – maximise open processes Innovation potential Risk loss of effectiveness

13 References Armellini A & Nie M 2014 ‘Open educational practices for curriculum enhancement’ Open Learning: The Journal of Open, Distance and e-Learning, vol. 28 no.1, pp Atenas, J & Havermann L 2013, "Quality assurance in the open: an evaluation of OER repositories." The International Journal for Innovation and Quality in Learning Bossu, C, Brown, M & Bull, D 2012, ‘Do Open Educational Resources represent additional challenges or advantages to the current climate of change in the Australian higher education sector?’ Ascilite 2012: Future Challenges, Sustainable Futures, Wellington, NZ. Bundy, A 2004, Australian and New Zealand information literacy framework: principles, standards and practice Australian and New Zealand Institute for Information Literacy, Adelaide. Dichev, C & Dicheva, D 2012, ‘Open educational resources in computer science teaching’ Proceedings of the 43rd ACM technical symposium on Computer Science Education, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA Mawoyo M & Butcher N 2012 ‘Sharing Existing Teaching Materials as OER: Key Considerations from Practice’ Glennie et al. Open Educational Resources and Change in Higher Education: Reflections from Practice Ch. 12 pp Ossianilsson, E Creelman A 2012, ‘OER, resources for learning – Experiences from an OER project in Sweden’, European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning vol. 17 no. 42. Sloep, P 2004, ‘Reuse, portability and interoperability of Learning Objects’ Ch 10 pp in McGreal (ed) 2004 Online Education using learning objects Routledge London and New York. White D & Manton M 2011 JISC-funded OER Impact Study, University of Oxford

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