Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Perspectives and Pathways Embracing genuine reconciliation Growing Competence in working with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Perspectives and Pathways Embracing genuine reconciliation Growing Competence in working with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures."— Presentation transcript:

1 Perspectives and Pathways Embracing genuine reconciliation Growing Competence in working with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures EL&QR 2012 © Levai, B 1

2 Conversations Conversation 1 – Context of Aboriginal Australia Conversation 2 – Identity and culture Conversation 3 – What is Cultural Competence Conversation 4 - Distinction between Competence and Competencies and Awareness Conversation 5 - Attitudes, knowledge and skills Conversation 6 - Reflecting – Using the Quadrants EL&QR

3 National Quality Standard This Professional Learning, Cultural Competence - Growing Competence in working with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures supports professionals to meet these National Quality Standards: Each child’s current knowledge, ideas, culture, abilities and interests are the foundation of the program 1.2 Educators and coordinators are focused, active and reflective in designing and delivering the program for each child 6.1 Respectful supportive relationships with families are developed and maintained 6.2 Families are supported in their parenting role and their values and beliefs about child rearing are respected 6.3 The service collaborates with other organisations and service providers to enhance children’s learning and wellbeing. EL&QR

4 “Cultural competence will be a new term for many of us. It is an evolving concept and our engagement with it will contribute to its evolution”. (DEEWR, 2010, p. 21). EL&QR

5 Margaret Wheatley best describes conversation as: Human conversation is the most ancient and easiest way to cultivate the conditions for change – personal change, community and organisational change and planetary change. If we can sit together and talk about what’s important to us, we begin to come alive. We share what we see, what we feel and we listen to what others see and feel. (Wheatley, M.J., 2002) EL&QR

6 ‘ We can position ourselves in ways that invite respect, curiosity and connection. We can also position ourselves in ways that invite judgement, disconnection and disapproval. The stance we take has profound effects on relationships and is shaped by our values and conceptual assumptions.’ (Madsen, 1999) 6

7 The Aboriginal flag The Torres Strait Islander flag The Learning Journey for Educators: Growing competence in working with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures EL&QR 2012 Conversation 1 7

8 Aboriginal Australia, identified by language groups EL&QR

9 1. Aboriginal South Australia: language groups 2. South Australian Aboriginal Nations Adnyamanthanha Antikirinya Arabana Arrente (Pertame) Bindjali Bunganditj Danggali Dhiari Diyari Gugada Karangura Kaurna Kuyani Luritja Malyangapa Meru Mirniny Nakako Narungga Nawu Njadjuri Ngalea Ngamini Ngarkat Ngarrindjeri Nukunu Parnkarla Peramangk Pirlatapa Pitjantjatjara Wadigali Wangangurru Wangkamana Wilyali Wirangu Yandruwandha Yankunytjajara Yaluyandi Yawarawarrak Aboriginal Nations SA EL&QR

10 Are you able to identify the Aboriginal nations upon which your service is located? © Levai, B EL&QR

11 ABORIGINAL DIVERSITY Aboriginal communities are as diverse as any other community. they are not all one cultural group and not all the same there may be similarities, but are also very different don’t assume one person speaks for all the community members EL&QR

12 Australian Aboriginal History A brief over-view EL&QR Capt. James Cook claims possession of the whole east coast of Australia for the British Crown 1788 Cook raises the Union Jack at Sydney Cove to start a penal colony Aboriginal resistance against the first fleet arrivals 1810 Aboriginal people moved onto mission stations where they can be taught European beliefs and used as cheap labour. Settlers try to control the growth control of the Aboriginal population with a policy of absorption 1810 Establishment of SA Mission Stations Poonindie Point Pearce Raukkan Gerard Umeewarra Swan Reach Nepabunna Ernabella Armata Ooldea Koonibba Yalata Oodnadatta 1836 SA established as a province of Great Britain by King William 4th under the letters patent 1872 birth of David Uniapon Ngarrindjeri preacher, author and inventor of shearers. Born 28th Sept at Point McLeay (Raukkan Mission). Considered a “black genius” Australia’s “Leonardo”. David’s image is on the $50 note – Raukkan church in the background 1888 White Australian Policy Policies that intentionally restricted non- white immigration to Australia Prime Minister Hughes in 1919 hailed it as “the greatest thing we ever achieved”

13 Australian Aboriginal History 1901 Federation The Commonwealth Constitution states “in reckoning the numbers of people…Aboriginal natives shall not be counted” It also states that the Commonwealth would legislate for any race except Aboriginal people The power of Aboriginal Affairs was left the States SA Aborigines Act Makes the chief protector the legal guardian of every Aboriginal half caste child under 21 yrs old. He also has control of where the child lives Replaced by the Aborigines Protection Board in Assimilation Policy “The destiny of the natives of Aboriginal origin, but not of the full blood, lies in their ultimate absorption…with a view to their taking their place in the white community on an equal footing with the whites” Segregationist practices continue until 1960s with separate sections in movie theatres, separate wards in hospitals, hotels refusing drinks and schools able to refuse enrolment to Aboriginal children 1967 Referendum Aboriginal people counted in the census and not considered flora and fauna 1976 Sir Douglas Ralph Nicholls (Yorta Yorta Nation NSW) declared Governor of South Australia by Don Dunstan 2008 Prime Minister Kevin Rudd apologises to the Stolen Generation for their “profound grief, suffering and loss.” EL&QR

14 Australian Aboriginal Massacres Yeeman (QLD) Medway Ranges (QLD) Kimberley Region (WA) Goulbobla Hill (QLD) Roeburn (WA) Barrow Creek (NT) Blackfellow’s Creek (QLD) Cape Bedford (QLD) Arneham Land (NT) Mt Isa (QLD) Battle Mountain Halls Creek (WA) Speewah (QLD) Rufus River (NSW) Elliston (SA) (1839 & 1849) “…. spoke about that day they escaped death and ran into the bushes. They stood and watched in horror as their people were driven off the cliffs into the sea. People tried to escape but they were cut down by whips, sticks and guns” Black Armband 2 – Elliston Massacres 2007 EL&QR

15 EL&QR 2012 Recognising that Australia’s history and the impact it has on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australia, is a critical and very observable element of Cultural Competence. (Matthews, L. 2011) 15

16 Thinking about you © Levai, B Think of a time you felt powerless, and a time you felt disrespected o what were the words you associated with each feeling? o were there lasting impacts of these experiences? o who do you think might feel they have no power in an early childhood setting? EL&QR

17 What does the data tell us about what is happening today? EL&QR

18 18 Early childhood educators guided by the framework will reinforce in their daily practice the principles laid out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (the convention). The convention states that all children have the right to an education that lays the foundation for the rest of their lives, maximises their ability and respects their family, cultural and other identities and languages.” (DEEWR, 2009, p. 5). EL&QR

19 What is Identity? Who are you? where are you from? where do you feel a sense of belonging? EL&QR 2012 © Levai, B Conversation 2 19

20 ‘There are many ways of living, being and knowing.’ ‘Children are born belonging to a culture which is not only influenced by traditional practices, heritage and ancestral knowledge but also by the experiences, values and beliefs of individual families.’ (EYLF pg 13) EYL&QR 2012 ‘ ‘ People develop as participants in cultural communities. Their development can be understood only in light of the cultural practices and circumstances of their communities - which also change’ (Rogoff, 2003, p. 3-4). EL&QR

21 Why is culture important? 21 Culture is about identity Culture defines who we are, how we communicate, what we value and what is important to us. Fostering cultural identity is in the best interests of the child. (Bamblett and Lewis, 2007, p. 45). EL&QR

22 Cultural Identity Comes from having access to: Your culture – its institutions, land, language, knowledge, social resources, economic resources. The institutions of the community (lifestyle) – its codes for living (social and environmental), nutrition, safety, protection of physical, spiritual and emotional integrity of children and families. Cultural expression and cultural endorsement. (DEEWR, 2010, p. 22) EL&QR

23 Growing Cultural Competence begins with individuals undertaking a process of reflection on their own cultural identity and recognising the impact their culture has on their own practice. EL&QR

24 Belonging, Being & Becoming The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia Cultural Competence is one of the 8 pedagogical practices that has been identified in the Early Years Learning Framework to promote children’s learning. EL&QR 2012 Conversation 3 24

25 Cultural Competence is much more than awareness of cultural differences. It is the ability to understand, respect, communicate with and effectively interact with, people across cultures (Educators Guide p.16) ‘cultural’ as defined in the Educators’ Guide: shared attitudes, values, goals and practices that characterise an institution, organisation or group. ‘ Competence’ as defined in the Educators’ Guide: the ability of all educators to make appropriate decisions and effective actions in their setting regardless of the absence or presence of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. (DEEWR, 2010, p.24) EL&QR

26 Why are there two Cultural Competence sections in the Early Years Learning Framework Educators’ Guide for Australia? EL&QR 2012 The difference between the two Cultural Competence sections that are explored are: Concept 6 – Cultural Competence Explicitly supports educators to recognise and promote the importance that diversity of culture plays in children’s development. Concept 7 – The Learning Journey for Educators: Growing competence in working with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures Explicitly supports educators to develop respectful and reciprocal relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Islander peoples within the local context (DEEWR, 2010). 26

27 Why is Cultural Competence important? Children’s sense of belonging is strongly founded in the families and cultures in which they are brought up. EL&QR

28 Distinction between ‘competence’ and ‘competencies’ ‘ ‘Competence’ refers to a broad global capacity; it is an outcome that describes what someone can do (Tight, 1996) ‘Competencies’ is a much more narrow concept that is used to label specific skills and abilities that are observable and assessable (Smith, 2005) EL&QR 2012 Conversation 4 28

29 Difference between ‘competence’ and ‘awareness’. EL&QR 2012 © Levai, B 29

30 Difference between ‘competence’ and ‘awareness’ Cultural Competence Cultural Awareness “ Cultural competence is a set of congruent behaviours, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency or among professionals and enable that system, agency or those professions to work effectively in cross-cultural situations” (Cross et al, 1989). ‘A set of values and principles, demonstrated behaviours, attitudes, policies, and structures that enable people to work effectively in cross-cultural settings’ (Petty, 2010, p.15). “Cultural awareness is the individual cognitive dimension where the focus is on understandings and awareness of the history, experience, culture and rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. The goal in this dimension is to change attitudes to facilitate changes in behaviour.” ( Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council Standing Committee for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Working Party, 2004). EL&QR

31 It is more than flying the flags, barbecues, music, visitors and ‘one-off’ events. An Early Childhood environment informed by BELONGING, BEING & BECOMING, the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, weaves culture, language and identity into every aspect of the early childhood setting. EL&QR

32 How do our relationships with families uphold and respect their rights to have their cultures, identities, abilities and strengths acknowledged and valued, and –respond to the complexities of children’s and families’ lives? –what are the tensions and challenges? –what do you need to think about? © Levai, B EL&QR

33 So: What does it mean to you and your service? EL&QR

34 SKILLS ATTITUDES KNOWLEDGE CULTURAL COMPETENCE CULTURAL COMPETENCE To operate in a cultural competent way you need to have 3 elements- Attitudes, Skills and Knowledge If you remove any one of the 3 elements then you cannot claim cultural competence If you remove just 1 element, then you are operating in an incompetent state EL&QR 2012 Conversation 5 34

35 SKILLS Find out what are the local protocols for living and working in the local context socially Develop reciprocal relationships Share about who you are and your family Respect confidentiality and privacy Find out what are the local protocols for communication and community engagement Get to know your community. Establish trust and credibility. If unsure always ask and seek permission. Don’t assume. Consult with a range of community members. Consultation should not be tokenistic. Develop reciprocal relationships and partnerships Attend local community celebrations Acknowledge that ownership of knowledge and expertise of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture is owned by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Communication requires listening, respect, patience and understanding Work with the community side by side not overseeing or being the boss. Respect confidentiality and privacy. For living and working in the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander contexts (socially) For working in local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander context (professionally) EL&QR

36 Acknowledgment of diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples Acknowledges the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history of Australia Acknowledge that identity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is determined only by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Culture, language and identity are interrelated Awareness understanding and of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, history and contemporary societies Understanding that the importance of connectedness to land and spirituality is the core of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural identity EL&QR

37 How do you believe attitudes are formed? Do you believe attitudes can be influenced? Why should some attitudes be changed? What do you think are the most effective ways of changing attitudes? EL&QR 2012 © Levai, B 37

38 Using a measuring tool to support our journey - The quadrants. Sharing our ideas and thoughts EL&QR 2012 Conversation 6 38

39 A learning journey of Cultural Competence occurs when ongoing reflection and environmental feedback involves and supports educators to move up and down the journey from unwilling and unable to willing and able EL&QR 2012 © Levai, B 39 (DEEWR, 2010, 26)

40 Being moral includes living the principles of justice. It involves making sure that everyone gets a fair go and that hidden attitudes to race, class and difference are made visible and challenged. Wendy Lee in National Quality Standard Professional Learning Program (2011). EL&QR

41 References Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council Standing Committee for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Working Party (2004). Cultural respect framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, Adelaide: Department of Health. Bamblett, M., & Lewis, P. (2007). Detoxifying the child and family welfare system for Australian Indigenous peoples: Self- determination, rights and culture as critical tools. First Peoples Child And Family Review, 3(3), Cross, T., Bazron, B., Dennis, K., & Isaacs, M., (1989). Towards A Culturally Competent System of Care, Volume I. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Centre, CASSP Technical Assistance Centre. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) (2009). Belonging, Being and Becoming the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia. Available online from Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) (2010). Educators Belonging, Being and Becoming: Educators’ Guide to the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia. Available online from Rogoff, B. (2003). The cultural nature of human development. New York: Oxford University Press. National Quality Standard Professional Learning Program (2011). Understanding cultural competence. E-Newsletter no. 7. Available online: Newsletter_No7.pdfhttp://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/nqsplp/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/EYLFPLP_E- Newsletter_No7.pdf Sarra, C. (2003). Young and Black and Deadly: Strategies for improving outcomes for Indigenous students (Queensland Teaching Series: Practitioner Perspectives). Deakin: Australian College of Education. Smith, MK. (2005). ‘Competence and competency’, Informal Education Homepage, Petty, S. (2010). The New Frontier: An Integrated Framework for Equity and Transformative Improvement in Education. California Tomorrow. Tight, M. (1996). Key Concepts in Adult Education and Training. London: Routledge. Villegas, A. and Lucas, T. (2007). ‘Preparing culturally responsive teachers: rethinking the Curriculum’. Journal of Teacher Education, Vol 53, No 1, pp20-32 Wheatley, M.J. (2002). Turning to one another: Simple conversations to restore hope to the future. San Francisco: Berrett- Koehler. 41


Download ppt "Perspectives and Pathways Embracing genuine reconciliation Growing Competence in working with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultures."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google