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Train-the-trainer workshop

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Presentation on theme: "Train-the-trainer workshop"— Presentation transcript:

1 Key messages from the QKLG, Continua and online PD materials Train-the-trainer workshop: Session 1

2 Train-the-trainer workshop
The Train-the-trainer workshop acknowledges the: diverse roles trainers and facilitators play dynamic and complex nature of early years service delivery variety of new and interconnected initiatives. The workshop focuses on quality early years programs.

3 Train-the-trainer workshop
Session 1 Key messages and introduction to the: Queensland kindergarten learning guideline (QKLG) Continua of learning and development: Queensland kindergarten learning guideline companion (Continua) online professional development modules. Session 2 Facilitating intentional conversations to support the implementation of the QKLG. Session 3 Where to from here?

4 Overview of Session 1 National and state context Key messages:
the QKLG the Continua links to online PD materials. 4

5 National and state context
Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians Goal 1: Australian schooling promotes equity and excellence. Goal 2: All young Australians become: successful learners confident and creative individuals active and informed citizens. 5

6 National and state context
Current curriculum materials aligned to the Melbourne Declaration goals: Early Years Learning Framework for Australia (EYLF) (for children birth to 5 years) QKLG Australian Curriculum. 6

7 National and state context
2009 EYLF was released. Office for Early Childhood Education and Care (OECEC) was formed to manage the national and state agenda for early childhood education and care. OECEC asked the QSA to develop and trial the QKLG. 2010 QKLG trial QKLG (draft) was trialled in 27 kindergarten services. QKLG (draft) was also available to services participating in the kindergarten funding pilot program. Wide-ranging consultations were conducted. Feedback informed the final version of the QKLG. The next two slides provide background information about the development of the guideline. During 2009 The national framework Belonging, being and becoming: The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia was released. This framework guides educators working with children from birth to five years. The Queensland Office for Early Childhood Education and Care (OECEC) was formed. It manages all national and state initiatives related to early childhood education and care. The OECEC asked the QSA to develop and trial the guideline. During 2010 The QSA published a draft of the guideline for trial. The guideline was trialled by 27 kindergarten services representing a range of service types and locations across Queensland. The guideline was also available to all services involved in the kindergarten funding pilot program organised by the OECEC. The trial sites were all part of the pilot program. The QSA consulted widely and sought feedback through: forums held around the state with early years educators meetings with a technical reference group, which included sector representatives, early years academics and an early years Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education expert trial teachers, via surveys, site visits and teleconferences the project steering committee (senior managers from OECEC, Education Queensland and QSA) responses from a wide range of QSA committees and reference groups consultation between the writing team and groups of educators with particular expertise, including teachers of special needs children, preparatory teachers, kindergarten teachers, Aboriginal educators and Torres Strait Islander educators. The feedback collected during the consultation processes informed the final version of the guideline.

8 Queensland context 2011 The QKLG and supporting document, the Continua are available. QKLG professional development materials are available on the QSA website: <www.qsa.qld.edu.au>. Additional professional development materials will be added to the website as they are developed. In 2011 The guideline and a companion document, the Continua of learning and development, are available. Online professional development materials to support implementation of the guideline are available on the QSA website: <www.qsa.qld.edu.au>. Additional professional development materials will be added to the website as they are developed.

9 QKLG in context The QKLG: aligns with the EYLF
guides curriculum decision making (see National Quality Standard 1.1) (NQS) meets Queensland legislative requirements for an approved kindergarten guideline provides more specific advice for the Queensland Kindergarten Year (the year prior to Prep) supports teachers to develop quality kindergarten programs supports early years educators to work collaboratively to deliver the kindergarten program. Importantly, the guideline: aligns with the EYLF guides curriculum decision making to meet the National Quality Standard, e.g. NQS 1.1: “The Early Years Learning Framework (or other approved learning framework) informs the development of a program for each child that enhances their learning and development.” meets Queensland legislative requirements for an approved kindergarten guideline provides more specific advice for the Queensland Kindergarten Year (year prior to Prep) supports teachers to develop quality kindergarten programs supports early years educators to work collaboratively to deliver the kindergarten program.

10 Implementing the QKLG Implementing the QKLG in Queensland contexts:
requires a team approach within a service supports the focus on quality programs as services: implement the NQS implement the EYLF through the QKLG promotes a focus on: continuity in learning pedagogy — adult’s role in play, effective teaching and learning in the early years requires supportive leadership. Implementing the guideline: requires a team approach within a service, e.g. teams working together, including: the kindergarten team, e.g. teacher, group leader and/or assistant the kindergarten teacher working with educators in the pre-kindy room all educators in the service working together to align practices and meet the NQS. supports the focus on quality programs as services implement the NQS and EYLF (across programs for children from birth to five years), and the guideline (in programs for children in the year prior to Prep). Note: Implementing the guideline in a kindergarten program is equivalent to implementing the EYLF, and supports the service to meet the NQS. promotes a focus on: continuity in learning — across programs for children from birth to five years, and into Prep The guideline supports services to consider ways to promote continuity, e.g. by focusing on: the parents’ role in promoting continuity as children move between services, rooms/groups, and into Prep ways to communicate and share information as children move from pre-kindy, to kindy and into Prep ways to share information with the Prep services that children will move to in the following year. pedagogy — adult’s role in play, effective teaching and learning in the early years The guideline supports services to consider ways to improve the quality of teaching practices that promote children’s success as learners, e.g. by focusing on: the active role teachers play in children’s learning the types of intentional teaching interactions and practices that best support learning ways to promote meaningful learning through indoor and outdoor play, real-life engagements and routines and transitions ways to balance and include learning based on children’s emerging ideas and interests and teacher-initiated planning across all learning and development areas ways to promote significant learnings, assess children’s learning progress and use evidence of learning to inform future decisions. requires supportive leadership Implementing the guideline requires supportive leadership, in order to plan and implement strategies to continually improve the quality of programs and support teachers in their professional role, e.g. by: promoting shared understandings about the value of a kindergarten program — valuing and tapping into the professional skills of the teacher, valuing all educators and the range of expertise they bring supporting families and parents to understand the kindergarten program and how it helps to link children’s prior, current and future learning identifying ways to support a teacher to fulfil their professional role, e.g. organising time and supporting teachers to: communicate and reflect with the kindy team, parents and support personnel document learning, analyse, interpret evidence, and make informed judgments complete transition statements (end of the year) collaboratively with parents engage in and share learning from professional development opportunities.

11 QKLG online professional development
This is a screen shot of the online site. The handout provides an overview of using the professional development materials including how they meet NQS and QCT standards.

12 QKLG online professional development
Module 1: Getting started Introduction to the Queensland kindergarten learning guideline Links to the EYLF and the NQS. Module 2: Knowing children, families and communities Responsiveness to the diversity of children, families and communities Promoting cultural competence. Module 3: Planning for learning and development Ways to plan for and with children to promote learning through emergent and planned experiences.

13 QKLG online professional development
Module 4: Observations to guide decision making How observation and documentation of learning inform planning. Module 5: Continuity and reflective practice Professional practices that promote continuity in learning and reflection. Resources A variety of resources to assist teachers in their professional practice: templates and completed samples professional topics.

14 QKLG online professional development
Module structure

15 Queensland kindergarten learning guideline
Introduction This section of the presentation walks viewers through the guideline and the advice it provides about various aspects of professional practice.

16 Overview Background information about the QKLG
Introduction to the QKLG: Purpose Perspectives and principles Decision-making practice — processes and elements Learning and development areas The Continua Professional practice Leadership. This presentation introduces the QKLG, developed by the QSA. The document provides specific advice for teachers developing kindergarten programs for children in the year prior to Prep. This presentation includes: background information about the guideline an introduction to the guideline Purpose Perspectives and principles Decision-making practice — interwoven processes and elements Learning and development areas the Continua (companion document) professional practice leadership.

17 Related online professional development
Module 1: Getting started Explore — A vision for the early years Examine — Introduction to the guideline Engage — Embracing the vision in our service Extend — Leadership: Embracing quality

18 Purpose The EYLF 1 Vision: 2 learning that is engaging 3
building success for life belonging, being, becoming. Outcomes Children: have a strong sense of identity are connected with and contribute to their world have a strong sense of wellbeing are confident, involved learners are effective communicators. For ages 1 2 3 4 5 The EYLF is a national document that identifies a shared vision for the early years that “all children experience learning that is engaging and builds success for life” (EYLF, 2009). The EYLF describes a vision of children’s learning: belonging — involves recognising that knowing where and with whom you belong is integral to human existence, providing a basis for children’s interdependence and relationships with others being — involves recognising and valuing the here and now in children’s lives, and viewing childhood as more than simply preparation for adulthood or for the future becoming — involves recognising the rapid and significant learning and development that occurs in the early years, and the capability and potential of all children. The EYLF also identifies five broad learning outcomes. Children: have a strong sense of identity are connected with and contribute to their world have a strong sense of wellbeing are confident and involved learners are effective communicators. Importantly, the EYLF is a framework that supports educators working in programs for children from birth to five years in prior-to-school settings.

19 Purpose The QKLG: shares EYLF vision: learning that is engaging
building success for life belonging, being and becoming describes five learning and development areas based on the EYLF outcomes: Identity Connectedness Wellbeing Active learning Communicating. The guideline: is based on the EYLF and embraces the inclusive vision that “all children experience learning that is engaging and builds success for life” (QKLG, 2010) describes a set of five learning and development areas that relate to the five broad learning outcomes identified in the EYLF.

20 Purpose The QKLG: 1 is more specific than the EYLF 2
targets programs for kindergarten children (the year prior to Prep) identifies specific knowledge, skills and dispositions (learning areas) is for qualified teachers (working with an early years team) guides professional practice promotes continuity from early learning into kindergarten and into P–3 programs. Ages 1 2 3 4 5 Prep to Year 3 The guideline: is more specific than the EYLF targets programs for kindergarten children (the year prior to Prep) identifies specific knowledge, skills and dispositions (learning areas) is for qualified teachers (working with an early years team) guides professional practice promotes continuity from early learning into kindergarten and into P–3 programs. The guideline supports teachers to develop programs for children aged approximately three-and-a-half years to five years of age — part of the cohort that the EYLF targets. It supports children to transition smoothly from kindergarten into Preparatory settings in Queensland.

21 Purpose The QKLG recognises:
and values all early years educators, parents, families and other partners the teacher’s role as a pedagogical leader who works with a team. Research link When qualified teachers work with early years educators, the quality of interactions and children’s outcomes are enhanced. (Siraj-Blatchford, I et al, 2002, Researching Effective Pedagogy in the Early Years: Research Report No. 356, Department for Education and Skills, UK, p. 147) The guideline: recognises and values all early years educators, parents, families and other partners recognises the teacher’s role as a pedagogical leader who works with a team to deliver a quality kindergarten program. Research shows that qualified kindergarten teachers enhance children’s outcomes, as trained teachers use the more sophisticated pedagogy, including sustained shared thinking. Other educators who work with qualified teachers also use significantly more sustained shared thinking interactions (Siraj- Blatchford, I et al, 2002, Researching Effective Pedagogy in the Early Years: Research Report No. 356, Department for Education and Skills, UK, p. 147). These more sophisticated interactions are essential for promoting children’s learning success.

22 Purpose The QKLG shares the national commitment to:
improving outcomes for Aboriginal children and Torres Strait Islander children building cultural competence strengthening all children’s appreciation and understanding of Australia’s first peoples. The guideline shares the national commitment to: improving outcomes for Aboriginal children and Torres Strait Islander children by recognising Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people, their traditions, histories and experiences before colonisation through to the present time building cultural competence by: providing opportunities for teachers to celebrate the richness and diversity of cultures and heritages that children and their families bring to the learning community exploring and building their own and their partners’ cultural competence, including making connections between aspects of Aboriginal culture, Torres Strait Islander culture and children’s personal cultural heritages, and exploring relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Australia strengthening all children’s appreciation and understanding of Australia’s first peoples and promoting learning about: Indigenous ways of knowing, being and learning contexts in which Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people live Aboriginal people’s and Torres Strait Islander people’s contributions to Australian society and culture.

23 Perspectives “Our image of the child is rich in potential, strong, powerful, competent, and most of all connected to adults and other children.” (Malaguzzi, L 1993, “For an education based on relationships”, Young Children, November, p. 10) The pedagogical perspectives that teachers adopt influence how they enact the vision of children’s learning. Loris Malaguzzi (1993, “For an education based on relationships”, Young Children, November, p. 10) suggested adopting the view that a child “ … is rich in potential, strong, powerful, competent, and most of all connected to adults and other children”. Enriching the quality and connectedness of children’s learning, embracing diversity and promoting equity and success for all children, requires teachers to: recognise and value different ways of knowing, being and learning draw on diverse cultural and Indigenous assumptions, beliefs, life experiences and practices.

24 Perspectives The vision “belonging, being and becoming” is enacted by adopting: the view that interactions between children and adults shape learning a connected view of: engaged learning and teaching the engaged child the engaged parent the engaged teacher. The guideline explores how the vision for the early years — belonging, being and becoming — is enacted by adopting: the view that interactions between children and adults shape learning a connected view of the child, parent, teacher and other educators collaboratively engaging in learning and teaching. Some key messages include: Learning and teaching is holistic and embedded in social and cultural practices. Children play an active role in constructing their knowledge and learn through active engagement, interaction with others and when they have choice. Parents play an active role in fostering and sustaining their child’s learning. Teachers play an active role in intentionally promoting learning through emergent and planned learning opportunities. Teachers promote learning through the relationships and partnerships they build.

25 Principles that guide practice
High expectations and equity Continuity in learning Shared decision making Respect for diversity Intentional teaching Holistic learning Reflective practice Respectful relationships Builds continuity by integrating: EYLF principles and practice Queensland P–3 principles and practice. The guideline identifies principles that guide professional practice. These principles promote continuity in children’s learning as they integrate the principles and practices identified in the EYLF and build on these to guide Queensland practice in P–3 contexts (QSA, Learning P–3). These principles focus teachers’ attention on the underlying factors that promote children’s sense of belonging, being and becoming. High expectations and equity — Children achieve when all partners hold high expectations and promote equity and success for all. Respect for diversity — Respecting and responding to diversity promotes children’s sense of connectedness. Aspects of diversity include social and cultural experiences, geographic location, abilities and needs. Holistic learning — Children’s learning is holistic. That is, children learn and develop in interconnected ways. Respectful relationships — Secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships provide strong foundations for children’s learning and development. Continuity in learning — Continuity and connectedness between children’s past, present and future are essential for smooth transitions and success in life and learning. Shared decision making — Effective decision making involves active engagement with partners, including engaging children in making choices, and parents, families and communities in sharing understandings, expectations, priorities. Intentional teaching — Intentional teaching extends children’s thinking and builds deep understanding. It occurs in emergent and planned experiences. Reflective practice — Engagement in ongoing reflective practice helps teachers to build understanding and examine assumptions and practices.

26 Related online professional development
Module 2: Knowing children, families and communities Explore — Knowing children and embracing diversity Examine — Making connections Engage — Action plan: Valuing children, families and communities Extend — Building connections

27 Decision-making practice
The next few slides explore the advice in the guideline related to decision-making practice.

28 Decision-making practice
Teachers’ decision making: is dynamic and interconnected is informed by their perspectives is framed by principles involves short- and long-term decisions is informed by their professional knowledge focuses on balance between emergent and planned learning is inclusive and responsive. Decision-making practice is complex and interconnected. Every decision teachers make: is shaped by the the perspectives they adopt and the principles that guide their practice shapes the quality of the learning environment, relationships, conversations, learning possibilities involves linking short- and long-term decisions is informed by the professional knowledge teachers hold about children’s learning and development, pedagogy, curriculum, observations, and conversations with parents, children, families and partners focuses on balancing emergent and planned learning opportunities. Responsive and inclusive decision making occurs when teachers recognise and embrace: the intentions of children, as well as those of the teacher the capability and potential of all children, irrespective of diverse circumstances and abilities the hopes and expectations that families hold for their children the perspectives and priorities of educators, families, children and other professionals. 

29 Decision-making practice
Elements: responsiveness to children building inclusive partnerships creating inclusive learning environments developing learning contexts — play, real-life engagements, and routines and transitions promoting children’s learning and development. Processes: planning and organising for learning interacting and co-constructing learning monitoring and documenting children’s learning assessing children’s learning reflecting on learning and practice. In the guideline, the analogy of the teacher as weaver is used to highlight the integrated nature of decision-making practice. The weaving diagram shows how decision making is embedded within the frame of principles that guide teachers’ practice. Each process is applied as teachers attend to each element.

30 Related online professional development
Module 3: Planning for learning and development Explore — Planning a kindergarten program Examine — Planning using an emergent curriculum approach Engage — Planning from a child’s interests Extend — Making learning visible Module 4: Observations to guide decision making Explore — Exploring observation Examine — Examining observation practices Engage — Observation in practice Extend — Engaging partners in observation

31 Decision-making processes
Specific advice is provided about the decision-making processes: planning and organising for learning interacting and co-constructing learning monitoring and documenting children’s learning assessing children’s learning reflecting on learning and practice. The guideline provides specific advice about each decision-making process. Note: The continua supports this guideline and provides advice to help teachers make consistent judgments about children’s learning progress. Additional information and practical resources are provided in the online professional development materials. Module 3 — planning Module 4 — observing and assessing — monitoring, selectively documenting significant learning, analysing and interpreting documented evidence of learning Module 5 — assessing — using the continuum of learning to make judgments about a child’s learning Module 5 — reflective practice Some key messages about each process: Planning involves the integration of long-term, medium- to short-term and daily decisions (both planned and emergent), and focuses on individuals, small groups and the whole group. Children contribute actively to planning and organising for learning when they negotiate ways to follow emerging interests and ideas, and choose ways to respond to ideas, objects and questions purposefully introduced by the teacher. Interacting The quality of teacher interactions has a major influence on children’s levels of involvement in learning experiences and, therefore, their learning outcomes. It is not sufficient to simply set up the learning environment, provide time for play and assume that learning will occur. Through interactions, teachers and children jointly construct learning as they collaboratively investigate, explore and build on ideas and thinking, and build connections between prior, past and future learning across the day and the Kindergarten Year. Monitoring and documenting Teachers monitor children’s learning through observation supported by conversations with the child or children. Monitoring and documenting requires selective documentation of observations, focusing on significant aspects of learning identified in the kindergarten learning and development areas. This evidence of learning informs their ongoing work with that child. Assessing involves: teachers reviewing the documented evidence of learning to inform short- and long-term planning to promote children’s ongoing learning interpreting documented evidence and making judgments about a child’s learning. Assessment is: an integral part of the overall process of decision making enhanced by engaging children, parents, families, colleagues and other partners in the process, e.g. children can be supported to engage in assessing their own and others’ learning through focused learning conversations sharing information. Reflecting: is an integral part of teaching informs ongoing decisions and is essential for sustaining and enhancing professional learning and practice involves reflection “in action”, e.g. as they are interacting with children and other partners involves reflection “on action”, e.g. at the end of a day, term, year involves considering different dimensions — technical, practical and critical. Teachers reflect: on children's learning with partners for professional growth.

32 Decision-making processes
Informed decision making This diagram shows the dynamic interactions, multiple entry points and pathways teachers take as they make decisions on the spot and when reflecting at the end of a day, month or term. The diagram also highlights where teachers draw on particular information in the guideline and the continua.

33 Decision-making elements
Specific advice is provided about the decision-making elements: responsiveness to children building inclusive partnerships creating inclusive learning environments developing learning contexts — play, real-life engagements, and routines and transitions promoting children’s learning and development. The guideline provides specific advice about each decision-making element. Each subsection explores: why each element is important and how it contributes to decision making what teachers focus on when making decisions related intentional teaching practices. Module 2 — responsiveness to children, cultural competence and inclusive partnerships Module 3 — planning for learning and development and intentional teaching within learning contexts Module 4 — responsiveness to children (through observation), observing learning and development to inform future decisions Module 5 — promoting continuity in learning and development (using the continua and sharing information) Some key messages about each element include: Being responsive involves: adopting a view of children as active, competent, capable and creative learners holding high expectations and promoting all children’s success embracing the diverse social and cultural knowledges, languages and ways of knowing and being. Building inclusive partnerships involves: having respect and trust recognising and valuing the vital role parents, carers and family members play in children’s lives and their ongoing learning engaging partners in contributing to children’s learning in a variety of ways acknowledging and valuing diversity and building relationships with families and members of diverse cultural groups who are part of the local community. Learning environments are welcoming, safe and nurturing, promote children’s holistic learning and development, and are inclusive of children’s diverse social and cultural backgrounds and abilities. Teachers create inclusive and challenging social, physical and temporal environments. Developing learning contexts: Laevers, in 2005, noted that, “The more choices children have about their learning experiences, the greater the degree of involvement in their learning”. (Laevers, F 2005, Deep-level learning and the Experiential Approach in Early Childhood and Primary Education, Research Centre for Early Childhood and Primary Education, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven) The guideline explores the three learning contexts: play — the dominant context in the kindergarten program. Children are encouraged to engage in a variety of types of play in both indoor and outdoor learning environments real-life engagements, e.g. cooking, gardening, visits, investigations, community experiences and using language, literacy and numeracy for real purposes routines and transitions — routines include daily organisational practices, such as meal and rest times. Transitions help children to manage changes across the day and move smoothly move between experiences and play spaces. Promoting children’s learning and development The kindergarten learning and development areas: relate to the broad outcomes for children from birth to five years identified in the EYLF describe the breadth of knowledge, skills and dispositions that children explore during the Kindergarten Year, within a holistic learning program identify significant learning related to each key focus. Teachers work with parents, the community and other partners to negotiate learning and development priorities.

34 Learning and development areas
EYLF outcomes QKLG areas Strong sense of identity Identity Connected with and contribute to their world Connectedness Strong sense of wellbeing Wellbeing Confident and involved learner Active learning Effective communicator Communicating The guideline identifies the relationship between the EYLF outcomes and the learning and development areas (QKLG). The guideline describes a key focus and significant learnings in each learning and development area (see Table 3 on pages 32 and 33 of the guideline: “The relationship between EYLF learning outcomes and Queensland kindergarten learning and development areas”). The learning and development areas are explored in more detail in the green section of the document. While the areas describe learning and development separately, children’s experience of learning is holistic. For example, as they engage in block play, they will expand their language skills (Communicating), build skills for relating to others (Connectedness) and develop positive dispositions and approaches to learning (Active learning). To identify learning opportunities within emergent as well as planned experiences, teachers draw on their knowledge of children (based on observations) and their knowledge of the learning and development areas. Identity Connectedness Wellbeing Active learning Communicating

35 Promoting continuity of learning and development
Teachers promote continuity by: using the continua to make judgments about learning progress sharing information about children’s learning throughout the year promoting the understandings, skills and dispositions that help children to make smooth transitions collaboratively developing a transition statement to summarise and share information about learning to support transition into the Prep Year. Teachers promote continuity of learning and development by: using the continua to assist them to make judgments about and reflect on children’s learning progress. Each continuum is described using three phases — emerging, exploring and extending. The phases are differentiated by the level of familiarity of the learning situation and level of support the child required to demonstrate learning sharing information about children’s learning to promote smooth transitions through informal and formal conversations and summarising children’s learning in the form of a transition statement. Information is shared between children, parents, carers, teachers and, when relevant, support personnel or other partners on entry into the setting, and informally and formally throughout the year.  A formal discussion towards the end of the Kindergarten Year is a useful way to share information with parents and carers and support each child’s transition to school. This discussion provides an opportunity for parents and other partners to collaboratively create a summary of a child’s learning in the form of a transition statement. A printed copy of the transition statement should be made available to parents for their own records. Parents may choose to pass a copy of the transition statement on to the school during discussions on entry into the Preparatory Year.

36 Related online professional development
Module 5: Continuity and reflective practice Explore — Continuity of learning and development Examine — Promoting continuity and reflection Engage — Continuity and reflection in practice Extend — Leadership: Continuity and reflective practice

37 Exploring the learning and development areas

38 Learning and development areas
Key focuses Identity sense of security and trust independence and perseverance confident self-identity Connectedness positive relationships with others respect for diversity respect for environments Wellbeing autonomy and wellbeing care, concern and positive interactions health and safety physical wellbeing Active learning positive dispositions and approaches toward learning confidence and involvement in learning being imaginative and creative exploring tools, technologies and ICTs Communicating exploring and expanding ways to use language* exploring literacy in personally meaningful ways exploring numeracy in personally meaningful ways The learning and development areas describe the breadth of knowledge, skills and dispositions that children explore during the Kindergarten Year within a holistic learning program. In addition, teachers work with family, community and other partners to negotiate learning and development priorities. Teachers use the learning and development areas to plan opportunities to engage children in integrated learning through play, real-life engagements, routines and transitions. The section provides examples of intentional teaching for each key focus and significant aspect of learning (this slide shows the key focuses). The document, the Continua of learning and development, is available to help teachers interpret evidence of learning and make consistent judgments about children’s learning.   * In the Communicating learning area, children communicate using first language, signed (alternative) or alternative augmentative communication (AAC) and Standard Australian English (SAE) as or when appropriate. Nonverbal children may substitute alternative or AAC for words. * In the Communicating learning area, children communicate using first language, signed (alternative) or alternative augmentative communication (AAC) and Standard Australian English (SAE) as or when appropriate. Nonverbal children may substitute alternative or AAC for words.

39 Exploring the learning and development areas
Key focuses Related EYLF learning outcome This slide explores the layout of the learning and development areas. Being familiar with the key focuses and significant learnings helps teachers to plan for, observe and selectively document significant learning. The slide shows one sample of a learning area and indicates the: key focuses related EYLF learning outcome learning and development area.

40 Exploring the learning and development areas
Significant learnings (related to one key focus) Key focuses Intentional teaching ideas Knowledge, skills and dispositions The slide indicates the: key focuses significant learnings (related to one of the key focus within this learning area).

41 Continua of learning and development
The continua is a companion document to the guideline.

42 Continua of learning and development
The continua helps teachers as they assess and reflect on evidence of learning to inform their ongoing decisions. There is one continuum for each learning and development area, except for Communicating. In the Communicating area there is a continuum for each key focus — language, early literacy and early numeracy.

43 Continua of learning and development
Supports teachers to make informed judgments about a child’s learning and development based on a collection of evidence of learning. The continua is used throughout the year, whenever teachers review a collection of evidence to make an informed judgment about a child’s learning and development. The continua is explored in more detail in Module 5 of the professional development materials.

44 Sample continuum of learning and development
Each continuum is described using three phases — emerging, exploring and extending (see Figure 5 on page 35 of the guideline). The phases are differentiated by the level of familiarity of the learning situation and level of support the child required to demonstrate learning. Teachers: review the evidence they have already documented and analysed place this collection of evidence alongside the continuum of learning and development for the relevant learning area or areas consider whether the child’s learning occurred in familiar and/or new situations identify the level of support the child required to demonstrate learning judge whether the child’s learning is more like the learning in one phase or another.

45 Continuum of learning and development
Teacher-provided “collections of descriptions”: support teachers to make judgments about learning that are consistent with those of other teachers are examples, and teachers add their own examples. In addition to the continua, “collections of descriptions” are provided to support teachers to make judgments about learning that are consistent with those of other teachers. These descriptions are examples only. Teachers add their own examples as they become familiar with the learning areas and phases. Teachers: record their judgments to help track learning progress over time and inform future judgments. This could simply be in the form of a dated note in the child’s folio or on a summary sheet within the folio reflect on what the judgment means in terms of future decisions that will promote this child’s learning.

46 Professional practice
The guideline supports teachers to build and use professional practices.

47 Professional practice
The QKLG provides additional advice related to: intentional teaching (Appendix 1) making decisions to support children with additional needs (Appendix 2) teachers’ thinking processes that support children’s learning (Appendix 3) transition statements (Appendix 4). It also provides: a glossary references and readings. The guideline provides additional advice related to the professional practices: intentional teaching — Appendix 1 explains a range of intentional teaching strategies used by educators to promote deep learning, including co-construction, scaffolding, modelling, explaining, questioning making decisions to support children with additional needs — Appendix 2 provides a thinking tool that provides practical advice, suggestions and examples to support the strengths, needs and interests of children requiring additional support teachers’ thinking processes that support children’s learning — Appendix 3 provides a mind map showing a teacher’s thinking as they make plans based on observational evidence of a child’s learning strengths and possible needs transition statements — Appendix 4 provides templates to summarise the child’s learning. Transition statements are collaboratively written by the teacher, parents/carers and the child. The guideline also provides: a glossary with definitions and explanations of terms references and readings to support professional reading and development.

48 Professional practice
The QKLG promotes ongoing reflective practice, including reflecting: on what we know about children on the effectiveness of the program (evaluation) on practices to improve outcomes for children with colleagues. Reflection is an integral part of teaching. It is essential for sustaining and enhancing professional learning and practice. Teachers reflect on a range of different aspects and reflect with colleagues to improve their practice and outcomes for children. Reflection helps educators connect theory to practice, maintain accountability and integrity in their practice and address professional development needs. Reflection that is collaborative and supportive is particularly powerful for promoting professional learning and change. It requires partners to respect diverse viewpoints and consider the relevance and value of new insights for their teaching contexts. Reflection takes time, commitment and courage. Educators need support from directors and service leaders so time can be allocated for quality reflection.

49 Leadership — promoting professionalism
Leaders can facilitate the implementation of the guideline by: maintaining effective and ongoing communication with all staff valuing the diverse expertise and skills of all staff providing time and support for colleagues to work together to identify and negotiate roles and responsibilities being open and flexible, so staff can explore new ways to plan, interact, monitor and assess learning identifying and building on strengths maintaining and encouraging a positive approach to change and challenge/s supporting collaborative planning for quality improvement celebrating and sharing successes. Leaders play a significant role in managing and supporting change. All staff can be engaged and contribute to positive change. In various ways at various times, a range of people may need to be involved in the process, including licensees, parents/carers, directors, teachers, group leaders, assistants, administrative personnel, support personnel, family and community members and other early years educators in prior-to-school and school settings. Change can be motivating and energising but is also sometimes tiring and challenging. Participants need support, time and space to step back and reflect on where they have come from, where they are now and where they want to go. It is important to consider ways to support all partners engaged in delivering quality educational programs to build their own sense of belonging, being and becoming: belonging — feeling that we belong, and building our interdependence and relationships with each other being — recognising and valuing the here and now in all partners’ lives, and celebrating and sharing who we are and what we are experiencing becoming — recognising professional learning and development, and the capability and potential of all partners. (Adapted from EYLF)

50 Leadership — promoting professionalism
The online professional development materials expand on the following aspects of professional practices: Online professional development materials Module Getting started 1 Knowing children, families and communities 2 Planning for learning and development 3 Observations to guide decision making 4 Continuity and reflective practice 5 In addition, a resources section provides: a wide variety of materials to support professional practices templates and samples of transition statements, planning and observation. The online professional development modules that form part of the professional development materials explore a range of topics. It is valuable for all educators and service leaders to be involved in at least some aspects of each module. It is also valuable for teachers to engage in professional conversations with other teachers to extend their understandings about each topic. Teachers and leaders will begin to develop evidence of how they are implementing the guideline and meeting the NQS. The modules also help teachers to meet the Professional Standards for Queensland Teachers (QCT) linked to teacher registration. 50

51 Quality standards — NQS and QCT


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