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1 Grade 3 Teacher Directions Hillsboro Elementary Interim Assessment Interim Assessment 2014 Reading Informational Text Interim Assessment 2014 Reading.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Grade 3 Teacher Directions Hillsboro Elementary Interim Assessment Interim Assessment 2014 Reading Informational Text Interim Assessment 2014 Reading."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Grade 3 Teacher Directions Hillsboro Elementary Interim Assessment Interim Assessment 2014 Reading Informational Text Interim Assessment 2014 Reading Informational Text

2 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 2 Interim Assessment Awesome Team Members, Writers and Editors! AllenBlake AlvaradoDeborah ChristensenHaley ChronisterNicole CrowellLindsay DanielsVicki DarnallMonica DelplancheDeborah DowDiane DuranLiana EllisCarrie FisherSheri GarciaLindsay GerigStephanie GiardHeather GodfreyBrooke GoldmannChristine HancockMelissa IncrovatoJamie JayGinger JohnsonJenn KagawaKo KinsmanLaycee LawsKimberly LeonardKelly LuleBerta LuleAlfonso MainesSandra McLainGina MunsonShawna OrozcoChristina PortingaTeresa RamerJudy ReamerErin RetzlaffSara RiderJami RookeKelly RussoJill SaxtonBrent SchoebelTrina SellLeslie ShepherdErin StinsonJanet ThoenNikki TovarArcema VanDykeErin WaltersChristy WedelMandy WintersMelanie ZagyvaAlia

3 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 3 Important Information A.This booklet is divided into two parts… 1.Teacher’s Resources and Answer Keys a.Pages 1 – 9 2.Student Assessment (can be printed in a small booklet form) b.Pages 10 – 26 B.This is the HSD Elementary Interim Assessment. This material is intended for assessing reading informational standards 1,2,3,5,6 and 7 taught in the first school semester. Printing Instructions… The interim assessment should be ordered through the HSD Print Shop. Be sure you order the section: Teachers Directions Be sure you order one copy of the student assessment for each of your students.

4 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 4 Reporting Categories Please enter student scores into Synergy in the 4 reporting categories listed below. Selected response items are one point each. Constructed response items are up to 3 points each. There are 5 possible points for each of the four reporting categories for a total of 20 points in grade three. 4 Reporting Categories Target 8 KEY DETAILS: Standards 1 and 3 Target 9 CENTRAL IDEAS: Standard 2 Target 11 REASONING - EVIDENCE: Standard 6 Target 13 STRUCTURES-FEATURES: Standards 5 and 7 SR Questions 5 Pts. Questions: 1, 2, 4, 11, 14 5 Pts. Questions: 3, 5, 6, 12, 13 2 Pts. Questions: 7, 8 2 Pts. Questions: 9, 10 CR Questions 3 Pts. Question: 15 3 Pts. Question: 16 Important Scoring Information Directions for Interim Assessment The HSD Elementary Interim Assessment is required. Please enter the student scores into Synergy. Grades K – 2 Students in kindergarten should have the passages read to them as a listening comprehension assessment. Students in grades 1 – 2 should read the passages independently if they can, however; students not reading at grade level may have the passages read to them. Grades 3 – 6 Students in grades 3 – 6 should read the passages independently unless an IEP signifies otherwise. Synergy: When students have finished the entire assessment enter the total number of correct points for each of the four reporting categories. There is a possibility of 5 total points for each reporting category. Selected Responses: 0-1 Point Each Constructed Responses: 0 – 3 Points each

5 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 5 Interim Gr. 3 Selected Response (SR) Questions 0 - 1 point (CR) - 3 Pts. Reporting Categories Key Details Main Idea Reason Structure Student Question # 124111435612137815CR91016 CR 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 Qu.# Class Total Optional Classroom Use : You may use this class scoring sheet if you wish.

6 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 6 SBAC Reading Assessment Constructed Response General Template Short Constructed Response Short constructed response sample questions are designed to assess CCLS reading standards. These are single questions that ask students to respond to a prompt or question by stating their answer and providing textual evidence to support their answer. The goal of the short response questions is to require students to show succinctly their ability to comprehend text. In responding to these questions, students will be expected to write in complete sentences.

7 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 7 15. How does the author feel about weaver ants? Do you agree or disagree? Use details from the passage Weaving in My Mango Tree. Scoring [Notes} “Teacher Language” Student gives essential elements of a complete interpretation: Essential elements that must be included in the student’s response are stating the author’s point of views with supporting text evidence. Aspects of the Task/Evidence: Student must convey that the author feels that weaver ants are valuable (use teamwork to build nests, protect mango trees from fruit flies and other insects, they protect other types of trees and they are hard workers). Students may also infer that the author likes the weaver ants because they still live in the mango tree today. Because this prompt requires some varied inferences answers that are reasonably supported by textual evidence are acceptable. Focused and organized, consistently addressing: The focus is consistently on the prompt. The sentences vary in length and interest depending on the point the student is making about the topic. Constructed Response Interim Assessment Answer Key Note: The main goal of the student response is to express how the author “feels” which may require some inferencing. Standard RI.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

8 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 8 16. The passage Fossils and Dinosaurs, state that T-Rex was a fierce meat eater. How do Figure 1 and Figure 2 show this is true? (RI.3.7) Scoring [Notes} “Teacher Language” Student gives essential elements of a complete interpretation: Essential elements that should be included in the student’s response are the specific parts of the illustrations that match the descriptions of T-Rex found in the passage to support that T-Rex was a fierce meat eater. Aspects of the Task/Evidence: Students should convey that the pictures help the reader understand that T-Rex was a fierce meat eater. In the passage, Fossils and Dinosaurs students locate and include examples that can also be verified in both figures. Some of these could include: (1) sharp teeth (2) claws on fingers (3) stands on two feet (4) has a powerful tail and (5) is able to run fast. The illustrations also support that T-Rex was tall (but not as tall as all dinosaurs). Using specific language from the passage (i.e., “razor sharp teeth” ) demonstrates that the student is connecting text to picture Focused and organized, consistently addressing: Sentence length should vary through the writing and directly relate to the pictures and the information provided about T-Rex. Constructed Response Interim Assessment Answer Key Note: The main goal of the student response is for students to connect the passage to the illustrations. Standard RI.3.7 and Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

9 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 9 Interim Assessment - Selected Response Answer Key Reporting Categories KEY DETAILS MAIN IDEA REASONING STRUCTURE

10 10 Interim Student Assessment Name________________________ Interim Assessment 2014 Reading Informational Text Interim Assessment 2014 Reading Informational Text

11 11 Project Mercury Project Mercury was a NASA program. It launched the first Americans into space. Astronauts made six flights during the Mercury project. Two of those went to space and came right back down. Four of them went into orbit and circled Earth. NASA chose seven astronauts for Project Mercury in 1959. It was one of the first things NASA did. NASA was only six months old. Test Flights Before astronauts flew, NASA had test flights. People were not on these launches. The flights let NASA find and fix problems. The first Atlas rocket that launched with a Mercury capsule exploded. The first Mercury-Redstone launch only went about four inches off the ground. NASA learned from these problems. NASA learned how to fix them. NASA made the rockets safer. Three Special Astronauts Three other "astronauts" also helped make Mercury safer. A rhesus monkey, Sam, and two chimpanzees, Ham and Enos, flew in Mercury capsules. Enos even made two orbits around Earth. Lessons Learned NASA learned a lot from Project Mercury. NASA learned how to put people in orbit. It learned how people could live and work in space. NASA learned how to fly a spacecraft. These lessons were very important. NASA used them in later space projects. Lexile 620

12 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 12 1.What happened when the first Atlas rocket with a Mercury capsule was launched? A.The first Atlas rocket went into space and came right back down. B.The first Atlas rocket orbited Earth. C.The first Atlas rocket only got four inches off the ground. D.The first Atlas rocket exploded. Standard RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. Standard RI.3.3 Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect. 2. What was an important outcome of Project Mercury’s test flights? A.NASA learned about rhesus monkeys. B.NASA learned that Enos made two orbits around Earth. C.NASA learned how to make rockets safer. D.NASA learned how many flights Project Mercury could make.

13 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 13 3. Which detail might be added to the section Three Special Astronauts? A.Project Mercury was a NASA program. B.The three “astronauts” made it possible to launch the first Americans into space. C.NASA launched the first Americans in space in Project Mercury. D.NASA was only six months old when it chose seven astronauts for Project Mercury in 1959. 4.Which sentence from the passage shows that NASA made sure Mercury was safe for humans? A.“Astronauts made six flights during the Mercury project.” B.“NASA chose seven astronauts for Project Mercury in 1959.” C.“Before astronauts flew, NASA had test flights.” D.“NASA learned a lot from Project Mercury.” Standard RI.3.3 cause/effect Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect. Standard RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

14 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 14 Weaving in My Mango Tree By Radha HS Section 1 When I was growing up in India, there was a mango tree in our yard. I spent many hours under the shade of that tree, looking up for the first signs of fruit. Mangos are sweet and juicy. As soon as I saw a ripe one, I wanted to eat it. Section 2 One day, I was searching the tree for mangos when I saw something else. It was big, fuzzy and covered with leaves. Ants were crawling in and out of it. What was in my mango tree? I ran inside and asked my aunt. Section 3 My aunt told me the big, fuzzy thing was a cocoon, home to the kenjga, also known as weaver ants. While many insects use silk to spin cocoons for themselves, weaver ants build a home for the whole community. Lexile 810

15 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 15 Weaving in My Mango Tree Section 5 My aunt told me to leave the weaver ants in the mango tree. Soon, they were living in other trees. Weaver ants can walk on pipes and tree branches to get to new trees. They can even walk on clotheslines. They sewed cocoons in our coconut trees. They made homes in our bitter-lime and lemon trees, too. Section 6 The weaver ants live in my mango tree to this day. Delicious mangos still grow. We eat the ones the monkeys leave behind for us! Family Business Weaver ants are hard workers. They use teamwork to make their nests. They pull together leaves. Once they have lined up the leaf edges, each adult ant holds a baby (larva) while it releases silk. The larva releases a sticky silk and glues the leaves together. This weaving of silk and leaves is how the weaver ants got their name.

16 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 5. What is the main idea of the passage Weaving in My Mango Tree? A.What the author learned about weaver ants. B.How weaver ants spin a cocoon. C.Living in India as a child. D.How weaver ants can walk on pipes and tree branches to get to new trees. 16 6. Which detail supports the idea that weaver ants help save mango trees? A.Weaver ants are big orange-red insects. B.If you bother weaver ants, they may bite you. C.Weaver ants eat fruit flies and other insects that harm fruit trees. D.Weaver ants are also known as Kenjga. Standard RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. Standard RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

17 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 8. Based on the author’s point of view, why might you leave weaver ants in a mango tree? A.If you leave them alone, they could save your mango tree. B.If you bother these ants, they may bite you. C.The author’s aunt told him to leave the weaver ants in the mango tree. D.They pull together leaves. 7. Why did the author probably include the section Family Business in the passage about weaver ants? A.The author might have wanted the reader to know how weaver ants glue leaves together. B.The author probably wanted the reader to understand the process weaver ants use to make their nests. C.The author included Family Business to add more interest to the passage. D.The author likes weaver ants and wants the reader to learn more about them. 17 Standard RI.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text. Standard RI.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

18 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 18 Fossils and Dinosaurs Theropods Theropods were the fierce meat-eaters of the dinosaur world. Unlike most plant- eaters, theropods walked on their back legs. They had long powerful tails. These tails helped theropods hunt, and kept them balanced. Tyrannosaurus Rex The most famous of the theropods is the Tyrannosaurus Rex. When most people think of dinosaurs, they think of the T-Rex. Tyrannosaurus Rex means “king of the tyrant lizards.” Description These guys were mean. At 12 feet tall and 40 feet long with 6-inch razor-sharp teeth, the T-Rex was the most frightening of all meat-eaters. They had small forearms with two “fingers” on each. These fingers were very powerful. The T-Rex had powerful legs that helped the dinosaur run. Meat-Eater This dinosaur was fierce and strong for a reason. It was a meat eater. It needed to be fierce and strong in order to kill and eat other dinosaurs. Figure 1 Figure 2 Lexile 640

19 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 10. How do both Figure 1 and Figure 2 show that T-Rex was a theropod? A.The only dinosaur with sharp teeth is the T-Rex. B.The T-Rex does not have horns. C.He is bigger than the human. D.The T-Rex is standing on his back legs. 19 9. What caption or title might be appropriate for both Figure 1 and Figure 2? A.Fierce Dinosaurs B.Different Kinds of Dinosaurs C.Dinosaurs Lived Long Ago D.Tyrannosaurus Rex Compared to Other Dinosaurs Standard RI.3.5 Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently. Standard RI.3.7 and Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

20 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 12. What could be another title for the passage Fossils and Dinosaurs? A.Meat Eaters and Plant Eaters B.Facts about Tyrannosaurus Rex C.Sharp Teeth D.All About Theropods 11. How did “T-Rex” get its name? A.It is very fierce. B.It is the most famous theropod. C.T-Rex got his name from being known as “king of the tyrant lizards.” D.T-Rex got his name because of his sharp teeth. 20 Standard RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. Standard RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

21 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 14. Which sentence provides an example of cause and effect? A.When most people think of dinosaurs, they think of Tyrannosaurs Rex. B.Plant eating dinosaurs walk on all four legs. C.T-Rex had a very long and powerful tail. D.T-Rex was able to kill and eat other dinosaurs because it had powerful fingers, sharp teeth and was able to run fast. 13. Which key detail does not support the idea that T-Rex was a fierce dinosaur? A.“Theropods walked on their back legs.” B. “Theropods were the fierce meat-eaters of the dinosaur world.” C.“The T-Rex was the most frightening of all meat-eaters.” D.“These guys were mean.” 21 Standard RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. Standard RI.3.3 cause/effect Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

22 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 22 15. How does the author feel about weaver ants? Do you agree or disagree? Use details from the passage Weaving in My Mango Tree. RI.3.6 (Teacher Only) Final Score_____

23 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 23 16. The passage Fossils and Dinosaurs, states that T-Rex was a fierce meat eater. How do Figure 1 and Figure 2 show this is true? (RI.3.7) (Teacher Only) Final Score_____

24 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 24 STOP Close your books and wait for instructions!

25 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 25 Student Self-Check How Did You Do? Directions: Check the box for each answer as Correct or Not Correct.CorrectNotCorrect Question 1 Question 1 What happened when the first Atlas rocket with a Mercury capsule was launched? RI.3.1 Question 2 Question 2 What was an important outcome of Project Mercury’s test flights? RI.3.3 Question 3 Question 3 Which detail might be added to the section, Three Special Astronauts? RI.3.2 Question 4 Question 4 Which sentence from the text shows that NASA made sure Mercury was safe for humans? RI.3.3 Question 5 Question 5 What is the main idea of the passage, “Weaving in My Mango Tree?” RI.3.2 Question 6 Question 6 Which detail supports the idea that weaver ants could save mango trees? RI.3.2 Question 7 Question 7 Why did the author probably include the section Family Business in the passage? RI.3.6 Question 8 Question 8 Based on the author’s point of view, why might you leave weaver ants in a mango tree? 3.6 Question 9 Question 9 What caption or title might be appropriate for both Figure 1 and Figure 2? RI.3.5 Question 10 Question 10 How do both Figure 1 and Figure 2 show that T-Rex was a theropod? RI.3.7 Question 11 Question 11 How did T-Rex get its name? RI.3.1 Question 12 Question 12 What could be another name for the passage Fossils and Dinosaurs? RI.3.2 Question 13 Question 13 What key detail does not support the idea that T-Rex was a fierce dinosaur? RI.3.2 Question 14 Question 14 Which sentence provides an example of cause and effect? RI.3.3 Question 15: Constructed Response Question 15: Constructed Response RI.3.6 Circle Final Score3210 Question 16: Constructed Response Question 16: Constructed Response RI.3.7 Circle Final Score3210

26 Rev. Control: 01/10/2014 HSD – OSP and © Susan Richmond 26 Question no.___


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