Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Sunday, June 17, 2012 Holy Spirit Advantage Prophetic Ministries (HSAPM) BIBLE CLASS.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Sunday, June 17, 2012 Holy Spirit Advantage Prophetic Ministries (HSAPM) BIBLE CLASS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sunday, June 17, 2012 Holy Spirit Advantage Prophetic Ministries (HSAPM) BIBLE CLASS

2 Means What He Says, and Says What He Means Jesus Case Study KJV002: The Lord’s Prayer

3 Revelation Chapter For I testify unto every man that heareth the words of the prophecy of this book, If any man shall add unto these things, God shall add unto him the plagues that are written in this book: 19 And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book. Here’s What We Know

4 2 Timothy Chapter 3 16 All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: 17 That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works. Here’s What We Know cont.

5 Matthew Chapter 5 17 Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil. 18 For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled. Here’s What We Know cont.

6 The Lord’s Prayer

7 We say: Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy Kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us for our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory. Forever and forever. Amen. Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done, in earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. [For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, for ever and ever.] Amen Anglican BCP says:

8 Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us, and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. We say: Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy Kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us for our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory. Forever and forever. Amen. Catholic Church says:

9 Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us. Save us from the time of trial and deliver us from evil. For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours now and forever. Amen. We say: Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy Kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us for our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory. Forever and forever. Amen ELLC says:

10 Matthew 6:9-13 says: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen. Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth. Give us day by day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. Luke 11:2-4 says:

11 3 Major Arguments 1. Questions of the validity of the translations and scriptures (scholarly revisions and omissions) 2. Doxology causes the discrepancy 3. Model prayer

12 Lord's Prayer: A Diachronic (change of language) Data Set Old English (c ) / Matthew 6.9 (WSCp, 11th c.) Fæder ure þu þe eart on heofonum, si þin nama gehalgod. Tobecume þin rice. Gewurþe ðin willa on eorðan swa swa on heofonum. Urne gedæghwamlican hlaf syle us todæg. And forgyf us ure gyltas swa swa we forgyfað urum gyltendum. And ne gelæd þu us on costnunge, ac alys us of yfele. Soþlice.

13 Early Modern English ( ) / The King James Bible (1611) Our father which art in heauen, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, in earth as it is in heauen. Giue us this day our daily bread. And forgiue us our debts, as we forgiue our debters. And lead us not into temptation. But deliuer us from euil: For thine is the kingdome, and the power, and the glory, for euer, Amen. Lord's Prayer: A Diachronic (change of language) Data Set cont.

14 Present-Day English Our father in heaven, we honor your holy name. We ask that your kingdom will come now. May your will be done on earth, just as it is in heaven. Give us our food again today, as usual, and forgive us our sins, just as we forgive those who have sinned against us. Don't bring us into temptation, but deliver us from the Evil One. Amen. Lord's Prayer: A Diachronic (change of language) Data Set cont.

15 The Book of Common Prayer

16 The 1662 Book of Common Prayer, which is still the official Prayer Book of the Church of England, has gone through a number of printings (in the hundreds) BCP

17 “The Proposed Prayer Book of 1786 was the first effort of the U. S. Episcopal Church to produce its own Book of Common Prayer, a process which was necessitated by the separation of that church from the Church of England caused by the Revolutionary War.” BCP

18 Its publication received much resistance, with many believing it deviated too much from its predecessor, the 1662 English Book of Common Prayer. The book appears to be largely the work of the Rev. Dr. William Smith of Maryland, and the Rev. William White of Philadelphia, later Bishop of Pennsylvania BCP cont.

19 Some of the main changes include: The term "Minister" is substituted for "Priest" in most places where it occurs. Although the Absolution of Sins is included, the term "absolution" isn't used. Some grammatical changes were made in the Lord's Prayer (retained in subsequent books). The phrase "He descended into hell" was omitted from the Apostles' Creed. “Change is Good?”

20 Perhaps the basis for so-called “Christian heritage” and “tradition.” Regardless of the version, the BCP amounts to a how-to set of written instructions much like Catholic Catechisms: Marriage Ceremonies in their entirety Christmas Day services Baptisms Etc… What Else is in There?

21 1. Does the Book of Common Prayer have any standing in comparison to the Bible? 2. What do the number of revisions tell us about its content? 3. If trespasses can be substituted for debts (based on Matt. 6), are the variations in the other versions ok? Critical points

22 Doxology: A liturgical formula of praise to God. An expression of praise to God, especially a short hymn sung as part of a Christian worship service. a hymn or form of words containing an ascription of praise to God. Doxological Argument

23 The complete 1988 ELLC modified traditional Lord’s Prayer version (…Save us from the time of trial and deliver us from evil…) is known as the (Anglican) English Language Liturgical Consultation (ELLC) text and was a translation according to some rendition of the original Greek version found in the New Testament. f Doxological Argument cont.

24 A familiar doxology is the one often added at the end of the Lord's Prayer: "For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever and ever, Amen." This is found in manuscripts representative of the Byzantine text of Matthew 6:13, but not in the most ancient manuscripts. Most scholars do not consider it part of the original text of Matthew, and modern translations do not include it, mentioning it only in footnotes. Doxological Argument cont.

25 “The same doxology, in the form "For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours, now and for ever", is used in the Roman Rite of the Mass, after the Embolism. The Catholic Encyclopedia (1914) states that this doxology ‘appears in the Greek textus receptus and has been adopted in the later editions of the Book of Common Prayer, [and] is undoubtedly an interpolation.’” Doxological Argument cont.

26 1. Even if the doxological argument is true, why still omit it? 2. Is it damaging to the prayer? 3. Does it detract from the purpose of the prayer? 4. Would Jesus have left out this doxology? Critical points

27 “the prayer was composed by Jesus, incorporating phrases from the synagogue liturgy, but in a unique combination and meaning…” THE COMPOSITION OF THE LORD'S PRAYER. J Theol Studies (1963) XIV (1): doi: /jts/XIV Model Prayer Argument

28 “The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints does not use the Lord's Prayer in worship. It is believed that Jesus gave it as an inspired example for correct prayer and not as a set text to be repeated like a ‘vain repetition’ (which Jesus, according to the King James Version commands against in Matthew 6:7, which more modern versions translate differently).” Model Prayer Argument cont.

29 1. Does it make sense that the Lord’s prayer not be repeated though we use Bible passages in prayer? 2. Do Christians recite the Lord’s prayer as an ordinance, or as perfect prayer? 3. Do we strive to be like Jesus or like ourselves? Critical points

30 What Do You Say?

31 Christian A We must consider that both Matthew and Luke were written for different audiences. Matthew was originally written in Latin and Luke in Greek. Both were also written approximately in 50AD and 60AD respectively, with the possibility that notes of the events were taken and later used to compose the books. Debt or "debita" in latin and its corresponding phrase in Greek were still present in the 1885 text (see perseus.tufts.edu) well beyond the 1611 KJV which also has debts listed.perseus.tufts.edu

32 Christian B Some of the original texts and translations of the bible (textus receptus, original manuscripts, etc.) can be a reference point to see how Jesus' dialect may have been different than what is present in the KJV, notwithstanding Matthew's and Luke's Godly inspiration to compose the works how God saw fit. Just as the NIV has added and changed verses and whole chapters, we can see by observation what is different. "Trespass" may speak more to Jesus' compassion and forgiveness rather than "debts." Vain repetition is the saying of multiple hail Marys.

33 Christian C Matthew and Luke had Godly inspiration when writing the books in the way they were composed. The KJV has also been preserved over the centuries. Since the leaders of the church may have been wealthy and more educated people than commoners, they may have took it upon themselves to use trespass rather than debts so the people would not use the passage to justify not paying their monetary debts. We may not know the reason behind why Matthew or Luke added or did not add the doxology even when looking at the earliest historic texts; some things are spiritual and may not be visible to the human eye.

34 Christian D The Catholic Church recites the Lord's prayer upon command by the priests and without a thought of what is being said. They do not treat it as a sincere prayer from the heart, but more a ceremonial practice. Jesus speaks of debt in other portions of the bible (see parable of the debtor in Luke 7:41-43) but does not necessarily mean monetary debt in all instances. One can be indebted to God as a result of sin or indebted to their fellowman for having wronged them.

35 Christian E Based on the Bible Class discussions of June 17, it appears that the word Debt was hardly used in the Old Testament Scripture. If so, the use of the word Debt in the place of Trespass in the New Testament Scripture was intended to misguide and water down the word Trespass; purposefully to minimize the effect the word trespass has on those who violate the laws of God. The Old Testament takes precedence over all Scriptures in terms of the use of words, and Jesus was aware of this and he knew the meaning of the two: debt and trespass. Again, at the time he spoke there was no New Testament Scripture, so Jesus relied on the Old Testament Scriptures in his teachings and in the use of words and their meaning as spoken during his time. At no time was debt known to represent sin, but it was only used to describe business relationships between the creditors and debtors; not for wrongful act.

36 Christian F Personally, I always thought that the usage of the word "debt" in Our Lord's Prayer in Matthew Ch. 6 was strange, and I wondered at why we used the word "trespass" instead. To me, a "debt" implies owing something or needing to return something. Back then, it seemed like we were changing what the Bible was saying. But now this study has brought to light the truth of the matter -- the word "debt" was incorrect to begin with; trespass is the correct word. If you think about it, a "debt" is not really the same as a "trespass" (scripturally speaking). As was said, debts imply owing something or needing to return something. So suppose Billy borrowed Karen's textbook, then lost it. Billy is now indebted to Karen; he owes her a textbook. Now suppose Billy buys her a new textbook. Well now, he has repaid his debt. His act of losing it is now forgiven. But what about Karen? Has she really forgiven Billy for losing the textbook? Is she still bitter even after it's returned? This example, I think, highlights the differences between a debt and a trespass. Debts are limited to material things. But a "trespass" which is essentially a sin, scripturally speaking, goes beyond that. Karen's hatred or anger can stay in her heart forever even though the debt was repaid. This is now a "trespass" on her part because she cannot forgive the initial wrongdoing that was done against her. Hence, the Lord cannot forgive her either. Forgiveness of trespasses requires the heart to be in the right place as well. You are never considered to be indebted to someone because you continue to hate them, even after the material "contract" has been resolved. Someone can hate you for something, borrow a pencil, and return it....yet still hate you. …"debt" really softens the meaning behind "trespass," and does not capture the true concept of what Christ means when he requires you to forgive trespasses so you can be forgiven as well. It is true that the word "debt" tends to carry a negative connotation in our society, but it's certainly not the same as the idea that is conveyed in the scriptures.

37 Closing Remarks More research is definitely needed on this. As you look at the arguments made by people online in the slides and the critical thinking questions, things get complicated. Let me clarify my intent on presenting this topic. My assumptions: 1) anything popular in the US/World "religious" structure is erroneous (ref. past writings on Jesus and populism) 2) the topic reflects a similar manner in which Sunday and Sabbath issue is presented 3) KJV is not the "original, textus receptus/manuscripts" but has been endorsed by the Lord in many, many ways My hypothesis was that: based on the many versions and the popularity of the way it is said in Catholic and Baptist institutions, and in many other places (even Hollywood), the Lord's Prayer was changed (not just the trespass and debt parts) somewhere in history by a church official or party to deceive, divide, reflect common language, and/or for any other unseen reason, which differs from that found in Matthew and Luke.

38 Closing Remarks cont. Three arguments were derived from my initial research online. That (1) the original statement was lost in translation; (2) the doxology being added or subtracted creates discrepancies; and (3) it is solely a model of prayer put forth by Jesus at the request of one of His followers. I had no idea what I would find or if there was a clear-cut answer. I assumed that I would find that the Catholic Church instigated the change at some point in history, specifically in their omission of the doxology, which glorifies and names God-to whom the prayer is directed. Therefore, I assumed that as Rome goes, so does the world religions, and thus, looking at the way they say it should be a red flag. In the end, I found the Book of Common Prayer to be an interesting subject, as well as the idea of treating the Lord's Prayer not as an ordinance, but as a model spoken to the follower who asked how to pray in Luke (this does not mean it should not be repeated of course).

39 Means What He Says, and Says What He Means Jesus THE END Case Study KJV002: The Lord’s Prayer


Download ppt "Sunday, June 17, 2012 Holy Spirit Advantage Prophetic Ministries (HSAPM) BIBLE CLASS."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google