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Introductory Lectures in Fundamentals of Christian Leadership.

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Presentation on theme: "Introductory Lectures in Fundamentals of Christian Leadership."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introductory Lectures in Fundamentals of Christian Leadership

2 Types of Leadership Session 2

3 INTRODUCTION The best way to introduce this section is to try and find a reasonable definition of leadership. The best way to introduce this section is to try and find a reasonable definition of leadership. – Unless leaders understand what the term leader means, he or she will have difficulty understanding what his or her role is. – There are as many definitions of leadership as many people who tried to formulate one. 3

4 Leadership Defined

5 Few noted definitions of leadership “The function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers." - Ralph Nadar "People are persuaded by reason, but moved by emotion; [the leader] must both persuade them and move them." - Richard M. Nixon "The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The last is to say thank you. In between the two, the leader must become a servant and a debtor. That sums up the progress of an artful leader." - Max DePree 5

6 Most simply defined idea of leadership is Most simply defined idea of leadership is “Leadership is the process of influence” – Edgar J. Eliston 6

7 The process always includes a number of key components: The process always includes a number of key components: – Leaders – Followers – A situation in which the interact – Means of influence which emerge from the leader Or from the cultural context – Values – Right time for the interactions to take place – Goals the leaders and followers are seeking 7

8 Leadership is a dynamic Leadership is a complex influence process in which leaders and followers interact in a context or series of contexts over time. Leadership is a complex influence process in which leaders and followers interact in a context or series of contexts over time. – There are a number of variables which influence the leader-follower situation. – Some of these variables are uncontrollable and can affect the leadership relationship in a negative way. 8

9 Contemporary Definition Therefore, the leader must be ready to make himself to respond to “complex contingency”. Therefore, the leader must be ready to make himself to respond to “complex contingency”. – J.R. Clinton offers a useful contemporary definition which reflects this complex contingency leadership perspective. 9

10 Leadership is: Leadership is: – a dynamic process over an extended period of time – In various situations in which a leader utilizing leadership resources, – And by specific leadership behaviors, – Influences the thoughts and activity of followers – Toward accomplishment of person/task aims, – Mutually beneficent for leaders, followers and the macro context of which they are a part. 10

11 Christian leadership differs from secular or business/political leadership. Christian leadership differs from secular or business/political leadership. – Christians derive their models from the Bible, but does not totally ignore modern techniques to enhance leadership. – What is important for the Christian leader is to know that a the leader is: 11 A person with God-given capacity and God-given responsibility to influence a specific group of God’s people toward God’s purposes for the group A person with God-given capacity and God-given responsibility to influence a specific group of God’s people toward God’s purposes for the group

12 Three major metaphors used for leadership The leader as a servantThe leader as a shepherdThe leader as a steward 12

13 TYPES OF LEADERS 13

14 Christian leaders may be classified into five general types. Christian leaders may be classified into five general types. – These five kinds of leaders differ in terms of: the nature of their ministries (whether direct or indirect. Sphere of influence Use of influence or power Roles Status Training/education Professionalism 14

15 Types of leadership 15

16 Type 1 leaders. (adapted from Elliston 1992, 31). Type 1 leaders. (adapted from Elliston 1992, 31). – They are lay servants who provide massive grassroots leadership within local churches. – Within the church they may serve as cell group leaders, Bible class teachers, youth organizers, and committee participants and leaders. – Within the community they serve as beacons of light for the gospel--the front-line soldiers of the kingdom of God. – Unbelievers have most contact with this type of leader, and new believers are typically nurtured by Type A leaders in vibrant, growing churches. 16

17 Type 2. Type 2. – These leaders are also lay leaders, but they have more authority and broader influence than Type 1 leaders. – They serve as elders and deacons of local churches, supervisors of Sunday School programs, mentors of cell group leaders, and lay counselors. – In various mission contexts, Type 2 leaders are unpaid evangelists who preach in local churches or work to initiate other churches. – Like Type 1 leaders, their ministries are direct or face-to-face – unlike Type 1 leaders, their influence extends beyond their immediate group. 17

18 Type 3 Leaders. Type 3 Leaders. – In Western contexts are full-time ministers in local congregational settings involved in face-to-face ministry but are likely to be bivocational in the Two Thirds World. – Their sphere of influence is the local church and the community in which community of believers exists. – They usually have some form of theological education which has equipped them to preach, teach, and evangelize. – Their influence is generally deep but not broad – significant among those to whom they minister but not extensive beyond their local area. 18

19 Type 4 leaders. Type 4 leaders. – have a regional influence much wider than in the church or agency in which they work. – They serve as full-time ministers of multi-staff or multi-cell churches, as administrators of small agencies, or as missionaries planting churches, nurturing new Christians to maturity, and training leaders in a domestic or foreign context. – These leaders have completed a formal system of training and their influence reaches beyond the people with whom they personally relate. 19

20 Type 5 Leaders. Type 5 Leaders. – Christian leaders who have national or international influence. – These are highly competent professional leaders, who because of their writing, teaching, and speaking, greatly influence the nature of ministry. – They provide the philosophical models out of which ministry occurs. – Although much of their ministry is indirect, they influence many people. – Type 4 and 5 leaders, to some degree, must remain Type 1 and 2 leaders in order to continue to be connected to real life. 20

21 The importance of knowing and understanding these types Understanding these different types of leaders enables local and national church leaders to make plans for appropriate leadership training. Understanding these different types of leaders enables local and national church leaders to make plans for appropriate leadership training. – After considering these types of leaders, it becomes apparent that mature churches need more of Type 1 and 2 leaders. It is our responsibly as TEAM to provide training and education to these important groups. 21

22 For effective evangelism to occur all people in our churches must be influenced personally, face-to- face. For effective evangelism to occur all people in our churches must be influenced personally, face-to- face. – Elliston says: "The number of people one may... directly influence at a worldview level may range between ten and twenty." – If there are 400,000 people in a country and if leaders relate to an optimum of ten people personally within the community, then, these number of leaders are needed 40,000 Type 1 4,000 Type Type 3 forty Type 4 four Type 5 22

23 Types 3, 4, and 5 leaders need to have a broad theological education, they tend to understand leadership training and education. They need to know what types of training types A and B need. 23

24 Knowing the types leads to know the functions of leadership for each type Search for opportunitiesSearch for opportunities Experiment and take risksExperiment and take risks Challenging the process Envision the futureEnvision the future Enlist othersEnlist others Inspire a shared vision Foster collaborationFoster collaboration Strengthen othersStrengthen others Enabling others to act Set the exampleSet the example Plan small winsPlan small wins Modeling the way Recognize contributionsRecognize contributions Celebrate accomplishmentsCelebrate accomplishments Encouraging the heart 24

25 Conclusion These functions apply to each type of leader. Whether one is a Type 1 or a Type 5 leader, he or she will be involved in all of these functions from time to time. These functions apply to each type of leader. Whether one is a Type 1 or a Type 5 leader, he or she will be involved in all of these functions from time to time. – Too often leaders are narrowly or simplistically views in terms of only problem-solving, coordination, motivation or decision-making 25

26 26

27 End of Session Two


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