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Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.1 Chapter 14 Sales day book.

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Presentation on theme: "Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.1 Chapter 14 Sales day book."— Presentation transcript:

1 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.1 Chapter 14 Sales day book and sales ledger

2 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.2 Learning objectives After you have studied this chapter, you should be able to:  Distinguish between a cash sale and a credit sale and between the way they are recorded in the accounting books  Explain why, when credit card payments are received at the time of sale, details of the customer are not recorded even though a debtor is created at the same time

3 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.3 Learning objectives (Continued)  Draw up a sales invoice  Explain why multiple copies are often made of each sales invoice  Make the appropriate entries relating to credit sales in a sales day book  Make the correct postings from the sales day book to the sales ledger and general ledger

4 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.4 Learning objectives (Continued)  Explain how trade discounts differ from cash discounts, both in nature and in the way they are treated in the accounting books  Describe measures that may be taken to exercise credit control over debtors

5 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.5 Cash sales  When goods are paid for by cash, cheque or immediate transfer, they are described as ‘cash sales’.  For accounting purposes, we do not need to know the name and address of the customer and there is no entry made in the sales day book.

6 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.6 Credit card payments  When someone pays by credit card, we treat the customer as though they are a cash customer and do not note their name or address.  However, a debtor does exist – the credit card company – and we do set-up a debtor’s account.

7 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.7 Credit sales  The majority of businesses will make mostly credit sales.  For each credit sale, an invoice is issued, giving full details of the sale, and this is used to request payment from the customer.  The business uses the invoice as a record of the sale and enters the details in the sales day book, including date, customer name, invoice number and invoice amount.

8 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.8 An example of an invoice

9 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide 14.9 An example of the sales day book

10 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Posting credit sales From the sales day book:  All credit sales are posted individually to the debit side of each customer’s account in the sales ledger.  The total of the credit sales is posted to the credit of the sales account in the general ledger.

11 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Posting credit sales (Continued)

12 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Activity Post the entries in the sales day book to the customer accounts in the sales ledger and the sales account in the general ledger.

13 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Activity (Continued)

14 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Trade discounts  Businesses often offer a trade discount to certain customers.  The trade discount is a percentage figure, and will depend on the amount the customer purchases.  Trade discount is shown on an invoice but never ever appears in the double-entry bookkeeping (unlike cash discounts).

15 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide An invoice with trade discount

16 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide How the invoice will be recorded

17 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Credit control  Any business should check that debtors are paying their accounts on time.  If cash is not received from debtors promptly, it can cause cash shortages for the business.  No business can survive cash shortages, no matter how profitable they are.

18 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Credit control procedures  Set a credit limit for each debtor, dependent on the debtor’s circumstances and stick to it.  When a payment is due, check if the money has been received, and if it has not, consider refusal to supply goods until payment is received.  Consider taking legal action if a payment is not forthcoming.  Make sure a customer is aware of what will happen if amounts due are not paid.

19 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Learning outcomes You should have now learnt:  That ‘sales day book’ and ‘sales journal’ are different names for the same book  That cash sales are not entered in the sales day book  That when credit card payments are received at the time of sale, details of the customer are not recorded even though a debtor is created at the same time

20 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Learning outcomes (Continued)  That the sales day book (or sales journal) contains information relation to each credit sale made in each period  That the sales day book is used for posting credit sales to the sales ledger  That the total of the sales day book for the period is posted to the credit of the sales account in the general ledger

21 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Learning outcomes (Continued)  How to make the appropriate entries relating to credit sales in a sales day book and make the correct postings from it to the sales ledger and general ledger  How to prepare a sales invoice  Why multiple copies are often made of each sales invoice

22 Frank Wood and Alan Sangster, Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, 12 th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2012 Slide Learning outcomes (Continued)  That no entry is made for trade discounts in the double entry accounts  That all businesses should operate a sound system of credit control over their debtors  Some measures that may be taken to exercise credit control over debtors


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