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Chapter 9 Buying and Disposing 9-1 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall CONSUMER BEHAVIOR, 10e Michael R. Solomon.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 9 Buying and Disposing 9-1 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall CONSUMER BEHAVIOR, 10e Michael R. Solomon."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 9 Buying and Disposing 9-1 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall CONSUMER BEHAVIOR, 10e Michael R. Solomon

2 9-2 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Objectives When you finish this chapter, you should understand why: 1. Factors at the time of purchase dramatically influence the consumer decision-making process. 2. The information a store or Web site provides strongly influences a purchase decision.

3 9-3 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Objectives (continued) 3. A salesperson often is the crucial connection to a purchase. 4. Marketers need to be concerned about a consumer’s evaluations of a product after he buys it as well as before. 5. Getting rid of products when consumers no longer need or want them is a major concern both to marketers and to public policy makers.

4 Learning Objective 1 Many factors at the time of purchase dramatically influence the consumer’s decision-making process 9-4 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

5 9-5 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Figure 9.1 Issues Related to Purchase and Postpurchase Activities A consumer’s choices are affected by many personal factors…and the sale doesn’t end at the time of purchase

6 9-6 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Social and Physical Surroundings Affect a consumer’s motives for product usage and product evaluation Décor, odors, temperature Co-consumers as product attribute Large numbers of people = arousal Interpretation of arousal: density versus crowding Type of patrons

7 9-7 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Temporal Factors: Economic Time Timestyle Time Poverty

8 9-8 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Temporal Factors: Psychological Time Social Temporal Orientation Planning Orientation Polychronic

9 9-9 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Five Perspectives on Time Time is a _____. Pressure cooker Map Mirror River Feast

10 9-10 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Temporal Factors: The Experience of Time Culture and the experience of time Linear separable time Procedural time Circular/cyclic time Queuing theory Waiting for product = good quality Too much waiting = negative feelings

11 For Reflection In what ways do you experience time poverty? What products do you purchase because of the sense of time poverty? 9-11 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

12 Learning Objective 2 The information a store or Web site provides strongly influences a purchase decision, in addition to what a shopper already knows or believes about a product Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

13 9-13 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Figure 9.3 The Shopping Experience: Dimensions of Emotional States

14 9-14 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Reasons for Shopping Social experiences Sharing of common interests Interpersonal attraction Instant status The thrill of the hunt

15 9-15 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall E-Commerce: Clicks versus Bricks Benefits: good customer service, more options, more convenient Limitations: lack of security, fraud, actual shopping experience, shipping charges

16 9-16 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall For Reflection Will e-commerce eventually replace traditional brick-and-mortar retailing? Why or why not? What are the benefits that traditional retail stores provide that e-commerce cannot provide?

17 9-17 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Retailing as Theater Landscape themes Marketscape themes Cyberspace themes Mindscape themes

18 9-18 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Store Image Store image: personality of the store Location + merchandise suitability + knowledge/congeniality of sales staff Other intangible factors affecting overall store evaluation: Interior design Types of patrons Return policies Credit availability

19 9-19 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall FedEx Makeover BEFOREAFTER

20 For Reflection How would you depict an impulse buyer? Explain Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

21 Learning Objective 3 A salesperson often is the crucial connection to a purchase Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

22 9-22 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall For Reflection What qualities seem to differentiate good and bad salespeople? In what retail outlets do you tend to find “good” salespeople? Why?

23 Learning Objective 4 Marketers need to be concerned about a consumer’s evaluation of a product after he or she buys it as well as before Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

24 9-24 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Postpurchase Satisfaction Postpurchase satisfaction or dissatisfaction is determined by attitude about a product after purchase Marketers constantly on lookout for sources of consumer dissatisfaction United Airlines’ “United Rising” campaign

25 9-25 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Quality Is What We Expect It to Be Expectancy Disconfirmation Model Marketers must manage expectations Don’t overpromise When product fails, reassure customers with honesty

26 9-26 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Acting on Dissatisfaction Voice response: appeal to retailer directly Private response: express dissatisfaction to friends or boycott store Third-party response: take legal action

27 For Reflection Share a story of a time you acted on a feeling of dissatisfaction with a product. Which behavior did you exhibit? Why? 9-27 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

28 Learning Objective 5 Getting rid of products when consumers no longer need or want them is a major concern both to marketers and to public policymakers Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

29 9-29 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Divesting of Unwanted Items Iconic Transfer Ritual Transition Place Ritual Ritual Cleansing

30 9-30 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall For Reflection Have you ever sold something at a garage sale or on e-Bay? Did you have a strong attachment to the item(s)? What divestment rituals did you go through as you prepared to offer the item(s) for sale?

31 9-31 Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Summary Many factors beyond the qualities of a product influence purchase decisions. People can be influenced by store image, point-of-purchase stimuli, salespeople, and more as they make product choices. Consumers evaluate their choice after making it and this evaluation affects future choices. Disposing of products is a challenge.


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