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Product Tracing in the Food Supply Chain Roger Clemens, DrPH Horn, Chief Scientific Officer IFT President (2011-12) Adjunct Professor, USC School of Pharmacy.

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Presentation on theme: "Product Tracing in the Food Supply Chain Roger Clemens, DrPH Horn, Chief Scientific Officer IFT President (2011-12) Adjunct Professor, USC School of Pharmacy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Product Tracing in the Food Supply Chain Roger Clemens, DrPH Horn, Chief Scientific Officer IFT President ( ) Adjunct Professor, USC School of Pharmacy September 12, 2013

2 Food Production Chain Accessed September 1,  Contamination in Production  Contamination in Processing  Contamination in Distribution  Contamination in Preparation

3 Why Product Tracing?  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates 48 million cases of food borne illness 128,000 hospitalized 3,000 deaths  Foodborne illness source attribution 70% of investigations unresolved at the state level (CSPI) 42% of outbreaks from unknown foods (CDC) 7 pathogens cause 90% of illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths due to known pathogens (CDC)  Challenges and opportunities in product tracing Epidemiological investigations Traceback investigations Recalls 3

4 Definition: Product Tracing  Traceback is NOT Recall How do you find points of convergence when much is unknown?  A single company doesn’t have traceability – but is a critical piece of the puzzle! 4 Traceback Recall

5 Bioterrorism Act of 2002  Established recordkeeping requirements Manufacturers/processors −Record shipment and receipt information −Capture incoming lot numbers as possible −Link ingredients to finished product to extent practical Non-manufacturers −Contact information for who it came from and went to Exemptions at supply chain ends  “1 up / 1 down” redundant system  Form of recordkeeping not specified Combinations of paper and electronic records (even within a facility) 55

6 Food Safety Modernization Act- Product Tracing Pilots 6  FSMA Section 204 (A) develop and demonstrate methods for rapid and effective tracking and tracing of foods in a manner that is practicable for facilities of varying sizes, including small businesses; (B) develop and demonstrate appropriate technologies, including technologies existing on the date of enactment of this Act, that enhance the tracking and tracing of food;

7 IFT’s History in Product Tracing  FDA contract since 1999 Competitively awarded, 5 year contracts Task orders focused on food safety and defense  In 2008, IFT began product tracing task for FDA Big report: “state of the industry” −Technical and cost evaluation reports June 2009, mock tomato traceback Coined the terms KDE and CTE  National Center for Food Protection & Defense (NCFPD) Traceability Project initiated in 2010  IFT Traceability Improvement Initiative Held three traceability research summits in 2011 ~50 participants per summit, a lot of industry participation Summit proceeding and white papers published on ift.org 7 KDEs - Key Data Elements; critical information for product tracing CTEs - Critical Tracking Events; critical points in the product’s history/movement through the supply chain at which KDEs need to be captured

8 IFT Task Order- FSMA Pilots 8  Statement of Work identify and gather information on methods to improve product tracing of foods in the supply chain explore and evaluate methods to rapidly and effectively track and trace food  Task issued September 2011  Final report submitted June 2012  2 Pilots Produce Item Processed Food / Ingredients  Collaboration Platform  Cost/Benefit Analysis

9 General Approach  Solicit Stakeholder input Products, collaboration platform, use of existing systems, initiatives, cost data sources  Baseline study- What is the process for traceback investigations, what makes them difficult/easy, where are the hang-ups in an investigation Qualitative- discussions with traceback investigators Quantitative- evaluation of previous investigations  Solicit participants  Conduct mock traceback pilots  Evaluate results and cost 9

10 Tomato Pilot 10  Tomatoes Associated with significant outbreaks from Short shelf-life Some commingling Participants −Growers – US and Mexico −Repackers/processors −Distributors & Wholesalers −Retail −Foodservice Scenarios Start at retail level where tomatoes may be implicated product

11 Complexity of Pilot Studies 11 Green = Grower Light blue = Ingredient supplier Dark blue = Manufacturer Orange = Warehouse Yellow = Distribution Center Red = Retail

12 Complexity of Pilot Studies 12 Green = Grower Light blue = Ingredient supplier Dark blue = Manufacturer Orange = Warehouse Yellow = Distribution Center Red = Retail

13 Processed Foods / Ingredients Pilot 13  “Kung Pao Chicken” Ingredients associated with significant outbreaks from −Peanuts −Red Pepper −Chicken Includes many ingredients, includes USDA  Participants Importer Ingredient suppliers Co-manufacturers Manufacturers Warehouse and distribution Retailers Additions: peanut butter, dry kung pao dish  Scenarios Peanut butter jar tested was violative Shoppers card information Illnesses from frozen/dry product

14 Complexities of Pilot Studies 14 Green = Grower Light blue = Ingredient supplier Dark blue = Manufacturer Orange = Warehouse Yellow = Distribution Center Red = Retail Retail 2 and 7 are the same company Peanut suppler 4 and 5 are the same company

15 Collaboration Platform  Definition – from stakeholders, not FDA Data analysis system which could be used by FDA to share and analyze data collected during outbreak investigations Used 10 different systems from technology providers in the pilots  Goals Feed data from pilot participants into collaboration platforms to determine how a system could be useful in traceback scenarios Identify key system attributes IFT did NOT to endorse or select one technology for FDA 15

16 Collaboration Platform  Tested the concept of Key Data Elements and Critical Tracking Events KDEs - critical information for tracing CTEs - critical points in the product’s history at which KDEs need to be captured  Non-participants given opportunity for input Many systems designed for unique use and could not be adapted easily for the pilots 16

17 17 Benefits Costs Cost Benefit Evaluation  Public health and social benefits For example – lives saved, illnesses prevented, gains in productivity  FDA operational benefits responsiveness, reputation, resource allocation  Industry benefits increased brand reputation, increased consumer confidence, improved recall scope, improved supply chain management  FDA operational costs Analytical and Field FTE’s and associated costs; training New System Implementation (Implementation and Maintenance) Compliance  Industry implementation costs Software; Capital expenditures Change to current processes Compliance

18 Evaluation of the Pilots Based Upon: 18  Baseline results  Traceback pilot data including:  Speed to convergence/resolution  Mapping speed of analysis to current practices  Assessing speed of analysis when industry uses a template  Collaboration platform results  Cost/benefit analysis Final recommendations for FDA based on above

19 Typical Food Supply Chain 19 Ag Suppliers Producers Processors Further Processors Wholesalers Distributors Retailers Food Service Customers

20 IFT Global Traceability Center  Vision: To become the global resource and authoritative voice on food traceability.  Business Model: Access and enhance global ideas, research and accomplishments in an efficient and affordable manner. Translate findings into practical, cost-effective traceability tools and data collaboration methods that can be used by agriculture and food stakeholders. Communicate the availability of these tools and their use to stakeholders through various channels. Publish the outcomes and benefits of its work to the public and industry. Assist with implementing solutions and transferring technologies. 20

21 Center Pillars 21 Global Food Traceability Center Reduce duplication by industry and government Ensure practical solutions that provide real benefit to stakeholders Provide tangible facilities and applied services (research, marketing, commercialization, education) Research Education & Training Protocols & Standards Technology Transfer

22 Center Partners  Cargill  Food Marketing Institute  GS1 US  International Association for Food Protection  Intertek Group  Lyngsoe Systems  Mars Inc.  National Fisheries Institute  Produce Marketing Association  University of Guelph  Walmart 22

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