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In Genesis 1, what did God ask the human beings he had created to do? 1:27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male.

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Presentation on theme: "In Genesis 1, what did God ask the human beings he had created to do? 1:27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male."— Presentation transcript:

1 In Genesis 1, what did God ask the human beings he had created to do? 1:27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. 28 God blessed them and said to them, "Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air and over every living creature that moves on the ground."

2 In Genesis 2, what command did God give the man? 2:16 And the LORD God commanded the man, "You are free to eat from any tree in the garden; 17 but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat of it you will surely die."

3 What happened in Chapter 3? Adam and Eve faced temptation  They sinned by disobeying God  They tried to hide, but God knew  God found and questioned them  They tried to pass the blame  God told them their punishment  They responsed  God showed them a caring act  They were forced to leave the garden 

4 Chapter 4 will follow a similar pattern Temptation  Sin  God finding and questioning the sinner  Denying and lying to God  God announcing punishment  Responding  God’s caring act  Being forced to leave  The reality of sin continues in the next generation and in the following generations. Sin intensifies here in Chapter 4.

5 We now have the first look at life outside the Garden of Eden. In this chapter, we will find the continuing potential for the best (the image of God) and the potential for the worst (the sinful, fallen nature). Genesis 4

6 Creating life Human Beings in Genesis 4 The worst: the fallen nature The best: in God’s image Intimate, close relationship Worshiping God Using cleverness for arts & culture. Being in God’s presence Being at home Destroying life Jealousy & broken relationship Lying to God Using cleverness for violence. Being separated from God Being removed from home

7 Genesis 4:1 Adam lay with his wife Eve, and she became pregnant and gave birth to Cain. She said, "With the help of the LORD I have brought forth a man.” Genesis 4 In spite of the Fall, Eve’s words point to divine and human cooperation and creative power in the birth of Cain. The original verb used here can be used to talk about God’s creative activity, and the preposition can mean “together with.”

8 Genesis 4 2 Later she gave birth to his brother Abel. Now Abel kept flocks, and Cain worked the soil. Abel was fulfilling the command of God to have dominion over the animals. Cain was fulfilling the command of God to subdue the earth. At first the brothers obeyed God’s commands from the time of creation (Genesis 1) in their two vocations. Both jobs were equal in God’s will.

9 3 In the course of time Cain brought some of the fruits of the soil as an offering to the LORD. 4a But Abel brought fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock. Here we have the first focus on worship. Both brothers brought offerings to God voluntarily, without any command to do so. The verses don’t tell us the reasons for the brothers’ sacrifice and worship, but probably it was an act of gratitude.

10 3 In the course of time Cain brought some of the fruits of the soil as an offering to the LORD. 4 But Abel brought fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock. 4b The LORD looked with favor on Abel and his offering, 5a but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor. Now comes a question that many people have raised and puzzled about. Why did Abel’s offering please God, but Cain’s offering did not?

11 3 In the course of time Cain brought some of the fruits of the soil as an offering to the LORD. 4 But Abel brought fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock. 4b The LORD looked with favor on Abel and his offering, 5a but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor. Some people think Abel brought the best produced from his labor with the animals—the firstborn and the fat portions, while Cain just brought some of what he had produced from his labor in the soil, not necessarily the first or the best. Why did Abel’s please God, but Cain’s did not?

12 3 In the course of time Cain brought some of the fruits of the soil as an offering to the LORD. 4 But Abel brought fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock. 4b The LORD looked with favor on Abel and his offering, 5a but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor. Other people think that Cain’s gifts were also some from the best he produced, but that there was something wrong in his attitude or motives as he offered his sacrifice and worship, though we are not told exactly what his wrong attitude or motives might be. Why did Abel’s please God, but Cain’s did not?

13 3 In the course of time Cain brought some of the fruits of the soil as an offering to the LORD. 4 But Abel brought fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock. 4b The LORD looked with favor on Abel and his offering, 5a but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor. Still others say that God specifically didn’t tell us the exact reason because what happens afterward in Cain’s response to God’s criticism is even more important to pay attention to than the original reason Cain had displeased God. Why did Abel’s please God, but Cain’s did not?

14 5b So Cain was very angry, and his face was downcast. So what was Cain’s response? And what were his subsequent responses after God tried to show him the right way? Cain’s first response was both anger and deep sadness over his rejection. Who do you think Cain was angry with? How does God respond to Cain’s feelings?

15 6 Then the LORD said to Cain, "Why are you angry? Why is your face downcast? God begins by asking Cain two questions. In those questions, God names Cain’s feelings. That shows his divine concern for Cain. That shows that God knows and understands Cain’s feelings and his struggles. What does God do next to try to help Cain?

16 7a If you do what is right, will you not be accepted? What God tells Cain here implies that God’s rejection of his offering doesn’t need to end in anger and deep sadness. What God says here implies that Cain can still do something to fix the situation—to fix his relationship with God—if Cain chooses. What else does God do for Cain?

17 7a If you do what is right, will you not be accepted? 7b But if you do not do what is right, sin is crouching at your door; it desires to have you, but you must master it." God is not going to force Cain to do what is right. God is not going to make Cain into a robot. God is going to give Cain a choice. So God warns Cain about the other choice— the sinful choice.

18 7 If you do what is right, will you not be accepted? 7b But if you do not do what is right, sin is crouching at your door; it desires to have you, but you must master it." God knew the temptation to sin would be great. Like the snake that tempted Eve, Satan was just waiting at the door of Cain’s heart, ready to pounce and jump into his heart and take over. So here God warns Cain to be careful to guard against the other sinful choice.

19 7 If you do what is right, will you not be accepted? 7b But if you do not do what is right, sin is crouching at your door; it desires to have you, but you must master it." God’s words should give hope, for God says, “…you must master it.” That means that though it may be difficult because sin does try to control, it would in fact be possible for Cain to overcome the temptation to sin. If it were not possible, God would not have said, “…you must master it.”

20 7 If you do what is right, will you not be accepted? 7b But if you do not do what is right, sin is crouching at your door; it desires to have you, but you must master it." God not only shows understanding of Cain’s feelings. God offers a way for Cain also to be accepted. God warns Cain against the dangers of temptation. Then God leaves the choice in Cain’s hands. God assures Cain that, though difficult, he can master the temptation.

21 8 Now Cain said to his brother Abel, "Let's go out to the field." And while they were in the field, Cain attacked his brother Abel and killed him. How does Cain respond? Sin knocks at the door of his heart, and Cain opens the door and lets sin enter and take over. Cain fell into temptation. Sin began with Adam’s and Eve’s disobedience, and now with Cain it has escalated to violence. God gave Cain an opportunity for redemption, but Cain did not choose to take it.

22 9a Then the LORD said to Cain, "Where is your brother Abel?” God cannot ignore Cain’s sin of violence. How does God approach his dealings with Cain and his sin? Again God asks Cain a question. The question gives Cain another chance. It gives Cain a chance to admit his guilt voluntarily—to confess his sin and to ask for forgiveness.

23 9b "I don't know," he replied. "Am I my brother's keeper?” Does Cain admit his guilt and repent? Cain does not admit what he has done. Cain does not repent. Cain lies to God, denying what he has done. Cain blames God for what happened to his brother. (His meaning is that since God is the one who is supposed to keep and care for each person, God is to blame if God hasn’t kept and taken care of Abel.) Cain does not hide like Adam and Eve, but...

24 10 The LORD said, "What have you done? Listen! Your brother's blood cries out to me from the ground. God has been watching! God knows exactly what has happened! God asks Cain another question, but this time more direct. “What have you done?” Blood conveys life and thus belongs to God, the creator and giver of life. Spilled blood cannot be covered or hidden from God. Cain has violated God’s will and intention for him and for creation.

25 11 Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother's blood from your hand. 12 When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth." Here, Cain still could have admitted what he had done, but he didn’t. God specifically named Cain’s evil deed and pronounced his sentence (his punishment). God judges human actions and justice is in God’s hands.

26 11 Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother's blood from your hand. 12 When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth." Compare Cain’s punishment to Adam’s in chapter 3.

27 4:12 “When you (Cain)work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth." Adam would have to work hard for food. 3:17-19 “ Cursed is the ground because of you (Adam); through painful toil you will eat of it all the days of your life. It will produce thorns and thistles for you, and you will eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food.” For Cain, the punishment is even stronger. His crops won’t grow. He will have to wander.

28 13 Cain said to the LORD, "My punishment is more than I can bear. 14 Today you are driving me from the land, and I will be hidden from your presence; I will be a restless wanderer on the earth, and whoever finds me will kill me." How did Cain respond to his punishment? Cain realizes that it is like a death penalty. Cain realizes he will be separated from the land. Cain realizes that will be separated from family. Cain realizes that will be separated from God.

29 15 But the LORD said to him, "Not so; if anyone kills Cain, he will suffer vengeance seven times over." Then the LORD put a mark on Cain so that no one who found him would kill him. However, God still has some mercy for Cain. God will protect him from anyone who might avenge Abel’s murder by killing Cain. God’s provision here is also intended to prevent further bloodshed.

30 16 So Cain went out from the LORD's presence and lived in the land of Nod, east of Eden. With the mark that God gave Cain in an act of mercy to protect him from being killed, Cain left the land where he had lived and moved further east of Eden. The place where he went and settled was called Nod, which means wandering.

31 17 Cain lay with his wife, and she became pregnant and gave birth to Enoch. Cain was then building a city, and he named it after his son Enoch. 18 To Enoch was born Irad, and Irad was the father of Mehujael, and Mehujael was the father of Methushael, and Methushael was the father of Lamech. In verses 17 we see that Cain built a city. In verses we begin to see some of the descendants of Cain.

32 19 Lamech married two women, one named Adah and the other Zillah. 20 Adah gave birth to Jabal; he was the father of those who live in tents and raise livestock. 21 His brother's name was Jubal; he was the father of all who play the harp and flute. 22 Zillah also had a son, Tubal-Cain, who forged all kinds of tools out of bronze and iron. Tubal-Cain's sister was Naamah. In verses 19-22, we see in Lamech’s children the development and advances of culture.

33 19 Lamech married two women, one named Adah and the other Zillah. 20 Adah gave birth to Jabal; he was the father of those who live in tents and raise livestock. 21 His brother's name was Jubal; he was the father of all who play the harp and flute. 22 Zillah also had a son, Tubal-Cain, who forged all kinds of tools out of bronze and iron. Tubal-Cain's sister was Naamah. Lamech’s son’s names all come from a word root that relates to the idea of “capability” and “productivity.

34 19 Lamech married two women, one named Adah and the other Zillah. 20 Adah gave birth to Jabal; he was the father of those who live in tents and raise livestock. 21 His brother's name was Jubal; he was the father of all who play the harp and flute. 22 Zillah also had a son, Tubal-Cain, who forged all kinds of tools out of bronze and iron. Tubal-Cain's sister was Naamah. Lamech’s daughter’s name means “pleasant” or “beautiful.”

35 23 Lamech said to his wives, "Adah and Zillah, listen to me; wives of Lamech, hear my words. I have killed a man for wounding me, a young man for injuring me. The next verse—the words or song of Lamech—is in the form of Hebrew poetry. One characteristic of Hebrew poetry is called parallelism. This is where a 2 nd line repeats the exact same idea of a 1 st line, but uses some different words.

36 23 Lamech said to his wives, "Adah and Zillah, listen to me; wives of Lamech, hear my words. I have killed a man for wounding me, a young man for injuring me. So, Lamech is probably only talking about one event—one killing. Here we have a murder again. God avenged Abel’s death, but here Lamech takes vengeance in his own hands. Lamech is admitting his act of murder, but he is not repentant about it.

37 23 Lamech said to his wives, "Adah and Zillah, listen to me; wives of Lamech, hear my words. I have killed a man for wounding me, a young man for injuring me. Lamech seems to me to be rather proud of his act. Lamach’s vengeance goes far beyond what was done to him. Lamech says that his violence in killing another was justified because it was done in retaliation for his injury.

38 24 If Cain is avenged seven times, then Lamech seventy-seven times." There had been progress in culture and civilization, but at the same time sin had also increased. So, Lamech brags that since if anyone killed Cain, Cain would be avenged seven times, then he (Lamech) whose act of murder was with “good cause” (according to him) would be avenged 77 times. Cain’s violence has continued and even increased through the generations.

39 25 Adam lay with his wife again, and she gave birth to a son and named him Seth, saying, "God has granted me another child in place of Abel, since Cain killed him.“ 26 a Seth also had a son, and he named him Enosh. Verses 25 and 26 show new hope. God provided a child to take Abel’s place. In Hebrew, the name “Seth” and the word “granted” are related. They share the same consonants and in Hebrew only consonants were originally written, so even his name points to that provision by God.

40 26 At that time men began to call on the name of the LORD. There is another sign of hope here. Cain had killed Abel in jealousy over God’s acceptance of Abel’s sacrifice and act of worship. Between then and this point, there is no mention of worship. Has God been forgotten? But here, worship of the LORD (Yahweh) begins again, not just by one or two, but by men. Will their worship of the Lord remain free of jealousy? Will it remain pure? What about ours?.


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