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Games for Learning Andy Griffith. Outline for the session Can we explore: 1.The importance of play in learning? 2.Different types of games? 3.Managing.

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Presentation on theme: "Games for Learning Andy Griffith. Outline for the session Can we explore: 1.The importance of play in learning? 2.Different types of games? 3.Managing."— Presentation transcript:

1 Games for Learning Andy Griffith

2 Outline for the session Can we explore: 1.The importance of play in learning? 2.Different types of games? 3.Managing students before, during and after games? 4.Unpicking the learning from games? 5.Build your confidence in the using, adapting and devising games?

3 Hopes Analysis - Speed Dating

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5 Games for different personalities!

6 Personality TypesPersonality Types

7 Characteristics of a Game? Learning goal Competition between participants High degree of interaction Opens up discussion and/or reflection There is a definite end or point of closure; In most cases there is a definite outcome (winners, losers, payoffs).

8 Types of Games Creative thinking games Problem-solving games Strategy Games Mystery games Decision making games Communication games Energising games Story games Question games Concentration games Observation games Language games Number games Memory games

9 Emotionally mature people are: AUTHENTIC VIVACIOUS PLAYFUL Affluenza by Oliver James

10 Features of Independent learning Social Factors: 1.Collaborative Groupwork 2.Co-operative Groupwork 3.Individual Responsibility Critical Disposition: 4.Pupil-designed Tasks 5.Pupil-designed Assessment 6.Pupil-negotiated Deadlines 7.Pupil-initiated Research 8.Reflexivity Wider Factors: 9.Pupil-use of a range of ICT 10.Community Involvement and use of the Environment 11. A sense of Audience 12. Presentation in Different Forms

11 Can’t Play; Won’t Play Who won’t play and why?

12 Motivational Styles/Deficits Learned Helplessness (Seligman, 1975) “What’s the point? I’m going to fail ANYWAY.” Students do not persist or take chances. When they fail they Personalise it, think it will be Pervasive, and think it will be Permanent. High self-worth concern and the threatened sense of self (Covington, 1984): “I’m not doing this, it’s rubbish” Fear being seen as incompetent. Prefer to be seen as rude and abusive rather than having their ability called into question.

13 Playing Games First: CONTAIN Then: ENTERTAIN Then: EXPLAIN

14 Games for Ideas “If at first, the idea is not absurd, then there is no hope for it.” Albert Einstein

15 Known to the Unknown Level 1 – start off with something they know and can make a positive association with.

16 “Celebrate Stuckness” Professor Guy Claxton

17 Facts in Five FOODDRINKBOOKSINGER MEN M A L T I

18 Using Bloom’s Taxonomy EVALUATION Making judgements. Assessing the value of something against a set of criteria (Judge, Recommend, Evaluate, Prioritise, Give opinions) SYNTHESIS Using old ideas to create something new. Relate knowledge from different sources (Design, Compose, Create, Hypothesise, Re- arrange) ANALYSIS Seeing patterns, Understanding how parts relate to the whole. Recognising structure (Investigate, Classify, Compare, Contrast) APPLICATION Using knowledge to solve problems (Make, Build, Demonstrate, Map, Draw) COMPREHENSION Understanding information. Grasping meaning (Give examples, Explain, Show) KNOWLEDGE Observing and recalling information. (Tell, Recite, Make a list, What …?)

19 Known to the Unknown Level 1 – start off with something they know and can make a positive association with. Level 2 – teacher applies this to a topic.

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21 Motivational Triggers (why people want to learn) Choice Challenge Curiosity Competency Positive expectations Fun Fantasy Relationships Relevance Fear/Thrill

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23 Known to the Unknown Level 1 – start off with something they know and can make a positive association with. Level 2 – teacher applies this to a topic. Level 3 – ?

24 Facts in Five ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?

25 The Magic of Small Games “3 Minute Motivators”

26 PIMP YOUR LESSON BeforeAfter

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28 3 Minute Motivators - Steps: 1.Cue to gain attention. 2.Explain why motivator being used. 3.Explain the activity. 4.Remind students to begin and freeze on cue. 5.Cue to begin. 6.Present the 3 Minute Motivator. 7.Cue to Stop. 8.Conclude and refocus by summarising what was done and why.

29 Step 2 Explain why the motivator is being used: “I have lost you…” “You seem restless…” “I can see you need a break…” “You seem to need some talk time…”

30 Step 8 Conclude and refocus by summarising what was done and why: “We were all a bit restless so we just played _______. Now that you’ve used up a bit of energy its time to return to…” “You seemed sleepy and many of you were losing attention so we played _______. Now that you’re awake…” “I felt we needed a quick break so we played _______. Okay now back to …”

31 3 Minute Motivators - examples Questions only Physical ‘jerks’ Personal Best Verbal Tennis Shared pen and Double pen games Box me in! Karate Maths Story Games Get Shirty Chinese Whispers Silent Maths Syllables Charade Challenge X-Factor Beat the Teacher Speed Dating Back to back Continuum Rapidough Unusual images Pictionary

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33 THINKING GAMES THINKING ABCs MORAL DILEMMAS VENN DIAGRAMS MYSTERY GAMES

34 Learning ‘Noises’ HA HA… Blah blah AHA… Errr? MMMMMM… Applause

35 BRAVERY COWARDICE

36 Some Ground rules, maybe? “We encourage everyone to contribute ideas.” “We give reasons for our ideas and opinions.” “We can disagree with others but we treat other people’s ideas with respect.” “We are prepared to change our minds but we don’t have to.” “We work with our group members and teachers to learn.”

37 Contracts Group and Individual Example: ABCDEF A sk Questions B e Open C ommunicate D o Your best E njoy yourself (and let others enjoy themselves) F reeze on command! Sign _______________

38 Can you spot the fake?

39 Mindsets FIXED: Ability is fixed and not open to change. People are either intelligent, sporty, arts, good at maths etc. or they are not. GROWTH: Ability and many personal characteristics are malleable. With enough motivation, effort and good teaching, people can become better at almost anything. Professor Carol Dweck

40 Feedback Tips 1.Feedback should be offered, but can be refused. 2.Feedback should refer to specific behaviours where possible in particular situations. 3.The attitude of the person giving feedback must be positive towards the recipient. 4.Feedback should describe a behaviour rather than evaluate it “When you raised your voice….. rather than “When you got all angry…”. 5.“I liked it best when …. Because …. I didn’t like it when …because …Next time you might …” are good openings for feedback. 6.Feedback should be checked with the receiver and by others present.

41 More wisdom than professors! “It ain’t what you do; it’s the way that you do it – that’s what gets results.” Bananarama


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