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Embedding the Florida Standards: Scaffolding for Science Success K-5 SCIENCE TEACHERS Division of Academics-Department of Science July 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Embedding the Florida Standards: Scaffolding for Science Success K-5 SCIENCE TEACHERS Division of Academics-Department of Science July 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Embedding the Florida Standards: Scaffolding for Science Success K-5 SCIENCE TEACHERS Division of Academics-Department of Science July 2014

2 Name Tent Fold a blank sheet of paper to set up a name tent Front: Your Name Back: If you were to write your Autobiography, what would the title be and why? Division of Academics-Department of Science 2

3 Agenda Goals, Outcomes and Objectives Suggested Agreements Florida Standards Connections in Science Factors Influencing Science Instruction Scaffolding Science Standards K-5 Good Science Instruction and Successful Science Strategies Hands-On Activities District Resources Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Resources Division of Academics-Department of Science 3

4 Suggested Agreements Be Present Keep an Open Mind Refrain from judging Share wisdom Trust the Process Division of Academics-Department of Science4

5 Goal and Outcome Goal To develop learners that use a variety of instructional strategies to consistently infuse Florida Standards during effective science instruction Outcome Statement Participants will develop skills and practice using tools to facilitate structures that will be utilized during planning and instruction to effectively infuse Florida Standards into their science curriculum Division of Academics-Department of Science 5

6 Session Objectives By the end of this session, participants will have a clear understanding of: a. How the Florida Standards are correlated to the Elementary Science Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS). b.How the Florida Standards can be infused into the science curriculum c.The scaffolding nature of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and learn how the Florida Standards facilitate a deeper understanding of the Science content. d.How to implement protocols to aide in the development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) targeted to develop a support system at their school sites focused on maximizing planning and instructional time Division of Academics-Department of Science6

7 Impact of Florida Standards on Science Instruction How do you integrate the Florida Standards into your science instruction? Division of Academics-Department of Science 7

8 Florida Standards that Impact Science Instruction LAFS LAFS.5.W.3.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. LAFS.5.SL.1.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. LAFS.5.RI.1.3. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text. LAFS.5.W.3.8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources. MAFS MAFS.5.MD.2.2. Represent and interpret data. MAFS.5.G.1. Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real- world and mathematical problems. MAFS.K.MD.2.3 Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count. MAFS.K12.MP.5 Use appropriate tools strategically MAFS.K12.MP.1 Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them MAFS.K12.MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively MAFS.K12.MP.3 Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Division of Academics-Department of Science

9 Florida Standards Connected to Science Standard (Sample) SC.5.N.2.1: Recognize and explain that science is grounded in empirical observations that are testable; explanation must always be linked with evidence. Remarks/Examples Annually assessed on Grade 5 Science FCAT 2.0. Also assesses SC.3.N.1.7, SC.4.N.1.3, SC.4.N.1.7, SC.5.N.1.5, and SC.5.N.1.6. LAFS Connections: LAFS.5.W.3.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. MAFS Connections: MAFS.K12.MP.1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; and, MAFS.K12.MP.2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively; and, MAFS.K12.MP.3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Division of Academics-Department of Science9

10 Factors Influencing Science Instruction Data Carousel Protocol What are the challenges that impede you from effectively infusing the Florida Standards during the Science Instructional Block? What should effective instruction look like in a science classroom? What tools/resources are available to facilitate science instruction? What instructional strategies should be used in a science classroom? Division of Academics-Department of Science 10

11 10 min. Break

12 Scaffolding Science Standards K-5 How are science topics and standards interconnected across grade levels? (1) Big Idea 8: Matter (2) Big Idea 9: Changes in Matter (3) Big Idea 10: Forms of Energy (4) Big Idea 12: Motion (5) Big Idea 13: Force and Motion Division of Academics-Department of Science12

13 Overall Driving Question: How can we support our students in crafting evidence based arguments in science and across the curriculum? What does Vince want you to do? Why is Vince so convincing? Write down all the evidence that Vince uses to convince you to buy Sham Wow. SHAMWOW Video Integration of Florida Standards through a Claims, Evidence and Reasoning (CER)

14 Claim: You should buy a Sham Wow because it absorbs water better than any other towel. Evidence: Does not drip. Holds 20 times it’s weight in liquid. Absorbs all liquid from a carpet. What more could Vince do to convince you that you should buy Sham Wow? (Hint: think like a science teacher) Let’s make Vince’s presentation even better and add the reasoning to his evidence. Reasoning: The Sham Wow towel works so well because it contains micro fibers. Micro fiber towels are made from two synthetic (man made) materials, usually nylon and polyester. The fibers are treated with chemicals and mechanically changed to make them very small, smaller than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair. This gives the towel a lot of surface area to make contact with the spill and absorb the liquid. The tiny fibers get into small places where most towel fibers cannot reach. Source: Tiny-Threads--3488

15 Claim Claims are the statements that answer your original question. The claim must be accurate, specific, and answer the question. The claim is usually one sentence in length.

16 Evidence The evidence is all the scientific data that supports your claim. It can come from a variety of sources such as: textbook, reading selections, videos, lab investigations, news reports, class notes, etc. When possible, it should include both qualitative and quantitative data. It is important to have numerous pieces of evidence in order to support or prove your claim.

17 Reasoning Reasoning is the explanation that connects your claim to the evidence that supports it or why you think your claim (answer to the question) is correct. It shows why the data you chose counts as evidence. It shows a detailed understanding of the scientific principles involved and uses correct science vocabulary. This explanation acts as a conclusion. If evidence is from an experiment, it can be used to support the “conclusion” of the lab. It is usually several sentences in length.

18 Progression for Argumentation K-12 GradeArgumentation Focus K-2 Claim + Evidence  Claim – Make conclusions from investigations.  Evidence – Use observations from investigations. 3-5 Claim + Evidence + Reasoning  Claim – Make conclusions.  Evidence - Use observations and measurements.  Reasoning – Provide a simple connection between claim and evidence using the big ideas they have learned in science. 6-8 Claim + Evidence + Reasoning (greater complexity)  Claim – Make conclusions.  Evidence - Use observations and measurements. Distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate data. Consider sufficiency of evidence.  Reasoning – Provide a justification for why the evidence supports the claim using scientific principles Claim + Evidence + Reasoning + Rebuttal  Claim – Make conclusions.  Evidence - Use observations and measurements. Distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate data. Consider sufficiency of evidence.  Reasoning – Provide a justification for why the evidence supports the claim using scientific principles. Each piece of evidence may have a different justification.  Rebuttal – Describe why a counter-claim is not appropriate by critiquing the alternative evidence and reasoning. Division of Academics-Department of Science 18

19 K-2 Claim-Evidence (CE) SC.K.P.8.1, SC.1.P.8.1: Sort objects by observable properties. Assignment: (Write a scientific explanation that answers the question?) How can we sort our school supplies? Claim: (The answer to the question, teacher records) Class discussion: We can sort our school supplies by observing them with our senses. Evidence: (Record all the evidence you gathered from reading passages, articles, videos, interactives, and/or hands-on explorations). Teacher records at least three pieces of evidence from class discussion that supports the claim. The school supplies can be sorted by size, some objects were small and some were large. Other objects were sorted by color by using the sense of sight. The objects can be sorted by observing their weight (heavy or light).

20 Grades K-2 Division of Academics – Department of Science

21 3-5 Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER) SC.3.P.8.1, SC.4.P.8.2, SC.5.P.8.2: Observe and measure objects by their properties. Assignment: (Write a scientific explanation that answers the question?) What properties can be used to classify your school supplies? Claim: (The answer to the question) Physical properties can be used to classify my school supplies. Evidence: (Record all the evidence you gathered from hands-on investigations). Ex. Observation/Measurement Table School Supplies/Qty. MassShapeProperty Use Sense of touch (texture) Magnetic? Pencil (1)5 gramsHexagonal prism writingsmooth/hardPartial Scissor (1)26 gramsIrregularcuttingSmooth/hardpartial Crayon (1)4 gramscylinderwritingSmooth/hardNo Marker (1)10 gramscylinderwritingSmooth/hardNo Glue stick (1)16 gramscylinderstickSmooth/hardNo

22 3-5 Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER) SC.3.P.8.1, SC.4.P.8.2, SC.5.P.8.2: Observe and measure objects by their properties. Claim: (The answer to the question) Physical properties can be used to classify my school supplies. Reasoning: (Write a statement that explains why you think your claim or answer to the question is right.) My school supplies can be classified by their mass, shape, color, hardness, texture, odor and attraction to magnets. As a result of measuring my supplies I learned some are greater in mass than others. For example, two of the five objects had a mass of less than 10 grams compared to the other three objects that were up to 26 grams. Based on the exploration using my senses of sight and touch, I discovered that I could sort my objects by color, hardness and texture. In addition, the objects could also be classified by shape such as regular versus irregular. Therefore, my school supplies can be classified by several physical properties.

23 Grades 3-5

24 Effective Science Strategy Wagon Wheel Protocol When can the Claims Evidence and Reasoning (CER) strategy be used during your science lesson? Division of Academics-Department of Science 24

25 How can the Florida Standards be infused into the Science Curriculum?

26 When can a CER be used? Use it to engage in structured argumentation to explain a scientific concept. Use it after an experiment to explain why a hypothesis was proven correct or not. Use it to justify an answer choice for a multiple (FCAT type) test question is correct. Use it to discuss claims made in videos, commercials, documentaries or news reports.

27 Claim, Evidence, Reasoning after Viewing a Video, News Report or a Documentary What is the scientific explanation? What key points did you learn from this video? What vocabulary words are connected to the lesson? What is the claim the reporter is making? What evidence does he or she cite in the report that supports that claim?

28 ELA CCSS Literacy Supports Content Area State Assessment Sample FCAT 2.0 Science Question A radiometer is a device with fins that spin when light energy strikes them. A picture of a radiometer is shown below. As part of an experiment, a light source was placed 50 centimeters (cm) from a radiometer. The light source gave off four different-colored lights for 30 seconds (s) each. After each color of light was turned off, the amount of time the fins on the radiometer spun was recorded. The results are shown in the table below. Which color of light provided the greatest amount of light energy according to the data in the table? F. red G. green H. blue I. white claim reasoning evidence

29 SAMPLE INFORMATIONAL TEXT Claim Evidence

30 LUNCH

31 Benchmark Focus Science Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter Florida Standards Integration LAFS.5.W.3.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. LAFS.5.SL.1.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. LAFS.K12.L.3.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate. MAFS.K.MD.2.3 Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count. MAFS.3.MD.1.2 Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters. MAFS.4.MD.2 Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Grades K-1Grade 2-3Grade 4-5 SC.K.P.8.1 SC.1.P.8.1 SC.2.P.8.1 SC.3.P.8.1 SC.4.P.8.1 SC.5.P.8.1 Sort objects by observable properties. Observe and measure objects according to their properties. Compare and contrast basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases

32 Practicing Science: Hands-on Activities Grades K - 5 Observing, Sorting, Measuring and Comparing Matter Embedding the Florida Standards Division of Academics - Department of Science

33 Supplemental Resources Textbook, Notebook (Journal) Common Grade Level Planning Hands-on Materials & Measurement Tools Essentials for a Successful Science Class computers LCD digital projector Internet Access Designated School Science Leader Pacing Guide & Focus Calendar Gizmos, PBS Discovery 5 E’s Explicit Instruction Department of Mathematics and Science

34 Science Department Website Overview Website Overview Division of Academics-Department of Science34

35 CER Jingle Claim – My way to fame stating my answer is part of the game Evidence – Got to show and prove To support the claim is my next move Reasoning – The why is the end This acts as my conclusion

36 “So What? Now What?” Reflect With what you’ve learned, what will your future classroom and science teaching look like? Division of Academics-Department of Science36

37 Learning Goals Grade 5 SC.5.P.8.1 Compare and contrast the basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases, such as mass, volume, color, texture, and temperature. (Level 2: Basic Application of Skills and Concepts) Scale Learning Progression Sample Progress Monitoring and Assessment Activities Score/Step 5.0  I am able to differentiate (tell the difference between) the physical properties (mass, volume, color, texture, and temperature) of solids, liquids, and gases. Go on a phase scavenger hunt and find at least two objects that represent one state of matter, two objects that represent two states, and two objects that represent all three states of matter. Create a chart to identify all of your objects’ properties. Score/Step 4.0  I am able to classify a material as a solid, liquid, or gas based on its physical properties. Use a three circle VENN diagram to classify a small group of materials (at least five for each) that represent solids, liquids, and gases based on their physical properties. Explain and record how you classified the materials. Score/Step 3.0 Target (Learning Goal)  I am able to compare physical properties of solids, liquids, and gases. Use a graphic organizer to compare the physical properties of solids, liquids and gases with examples of each. Score/Step 2.0 Target  I am able to identify the physical properties of solids, liquids, and gases. Create a foldable. Illustrate the physical properties of basic solids, liquids, and gases. Division of Academics-Department of Science 37

38 Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Power My Learning Grade 5 – Play Lists Dr. Lightburn’s Class: Class Code: Quarter 1: – Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter and Big Idea 9: Changes in Matter properties-of-matter properties-of-matter Interactive Sites for Education Division of Academics-Department of Science38


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