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1 © Press Spacebar or down arrow to continue 1

2  Congratulations! You have purchased a FunArtLessons.com Art Unit.  To view and print this document :  If you have Microsoft PowerPoint installed on your computer then you are viewing this page in design mode. From the menu bar at the top of the window select View Slideshow. To print this unit as a booklet, click on the office button (PPT 2007) or File Print (PPT 2003) and select print. If you do not have Microsoft PowerPoint installed on your computer then you are viewing this document using PowerPoint Viewer. Use the space bar or arrow keys to advance through the slides. To print, hold down the command key while pressing the P key. This will open your print dialogue box. To exit PowerPoint Viewer press Esc key. ©

3 C ONCEAL /R EVEAL : P LASTER M ASKS A FunArtLessons.com ART UNIT By Kari Wilson © Press Space bar or down arrow to continue 48 page Art Unit appropriate for students age 8-16 in art classes, scout groups, recreation classes, after school clubs, independent study, home school settings 3

4 I NCLUDED IN THIS P OWER P OINT ©  About the Author  FunArtLessons.com art unit components  How to use this Power Point: book or slideshow  National Standards  I Can Statements: Learning goals and objectives  Lesson Sequence Chart  Materials List  Art Words: vocabulary  Student Gallery  Guiding Question  Project Description  Journal Response Topics  Research Task*  Art Start activities  Project Directions  Assessment Guide*  Self-Critique*  Artist’s Statement* *Copy master included. Teacher Section Student Section begins on page 20

5 A BOUT THE A UTHOR © Kari Wilson has been an educator for over twenty years, teaching first through sixth grades as well as middle school language arts and social studies. Her current passion is teaching art at a public middle school in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Kari's own education includes a Bachelor of Fine Arts from San Francisco State University, a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Arizona, and a Master of Education, along with teaching credentials. Kari stepped out of the classroom for several years to serve as a Curriculum Associate in a large California school district, where she developed a variety of programs from “Back to School with Basic Health and Safety” to “The Achievement Club,” a program designed to help struggling readers. This program received the Golden Bell award from the California School Boards Association. As a member of the California History Social Science Project (CHSSP), Kari was involved in the development and implementation of numerous social studies units. Kari’s unit, Child Work in Colonial Days, was published by the UCLA branch of CHSSP. Kari has continued exploring her interest in history as a recent participant in a Gilder Lehrman summer institute at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library, where she engaged in research for the development of a series of civics lessons which include integrated art activities. These lessons on the Core Democratic Values, as well as her other curriculum units for preschool through 10th grade, are available online at FunLessonplans.com.

6 F UN A RT L ESSONS A RT U NIT C OMPONENTS Guiding Question The guiding question provides “food for thought” to help connect the project to a larger philosophical discussion. Journal Response Topics Students write responses in their sketchbooks and share with partners and group mates. This process helps enrich class discussion and helps students plan their project. Art Start Art Start is a series of independent activities which provide exercise in basic art skills and concepts needed for the unit project. Students work independently in their sketchbook the first minutes of class. Research The research component encourages students to explore cultural, historical and environmental connections between the unit project and the world beyond the classroom. The Project Slides provide step-by-step instructions. During project work days demonstrate additional skills or methods as they become necessary. The Lesson Sequence chart provides a basic time frame for the project. During project work days circulate assisting students with methods, techniques and ideas. Assessment Use the “I Can” slide and worksheet to help students track their learning. Use the Interactive Assessment Guide to engage students in analyzing the ways in which their art and work habits meet the project criteria. The self-critique questions ask the artist to reflect on the art-making process. Answers can be rewritten on the form provided to create an Artist’s Statement. Exhibition It is important for students to have the opportunity to display their work to complete the process of communication in which artists are engaged. Instructions are provided for students to create a gallery information card, write an artist’s statement and find an appropriate venue for display. ©

7 H OW TO USE THIS P OWER P OINT : B OOK OR S LIDESHOW U SE THIS DOCUMENT AS A B OOK, A SLIDESHOW, OR BOTH, DEPENDING ON YOUR RESOURCES.  If you have a computer and digital projector in your classroom:  Read the Teacher Section directly on the computer screen as you plan your lessons. Then, display the Student Section ArtStart sketchbook activities and step-by-step project instructions as a slideshow for your class. Print out only the student worksheets, as needed.  If you do not have a digital projector in your classroom:  Read the Teacher Section on the computer screen as you plan your lessons. Photocopy Student Section pages to use as hand- outs. Use the step-by-step project instructions to plan the project and guide your demonstrations.  If you do not have a computer in your classroom:  Print entire document and use as you would any hard-copy, teacher resource publication. Make photocopies of Student Section pages to use as handouts. ©

8 T HIS L ESSON M EETS N ATIONAL S TANDARDS T HIS LESSON ADDRESSES THE FOLLOWING STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION : Content StandardAchievement Standard Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes Students apply media, techniques, and processes with sufficient skill, confidence and sensitivity that their intentions are carried out in their art. Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas Students use subjects, themes, and symbols that demonstrate knowledge of contexts, values, and aesthetics that communicate intended meaning in artworks. Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures Students know and compare the characteristics of artworks in various eras and cultures. ©

9 W HAT YOUR STUDENTS WILL L EARN Your students will learn about art, themselves and the world in this unit. They will also have fun! The “I Can” statements are a kid friendly way or presenting the learning goals and objectives of this unit, all of which have been aligned with the National Art Education Association Standards. Have students write each “I Can” statement in their sketchbooks as they gain new skills. Or, photocopy the “I Can” statements check-off sheet in the student section so that students can track their progress. I CAN: Compare the characteristics of two different masks from Africa. Describe the traditional uses of masks in three different tribes of Africa. Use plaster cloth, paint and collage materials to create a mask. Apply the elements of DESIGN: proportion, emphasis and symmetry in my mask. Choose a subject, symbols and themes to communicate a “big idea” in my artwork. Evaluate my artwork in a written critique using three vocabulary terms. 9 © 2009

10 L ESSON S EQUENCE ACTIVITY SEQUENCE REFLECTS A DAILY 55 MINUTE CLASS PERIOD. A DJUST THIS SCHEDULE TO FIT YOUR UNIQUE TEACHING SITUATION. Day 1Day 2Day 3Day 4Day 5 Slides Introduce project & discuss Guiding Question Art Start #1 Review “I Can” statements Introduce vocabulary Slides Journal Response 1 Art Start #2 Slide Research masks of Africa Slide 31 Art Start #3 Share research from previous day in small groups Slide Art Start #4 Journal Response 2 Slides Show student gallery images as time allows ©

11 L ESSON S EQUENCE ACTIVITY SEQUENCE REFLECTS A DAILY 55 MINUTE CLASS PERIOD. A DJUST THIS SCHEDULE TO FIT YOUR UNIQUE TEACHING SITUATION Day 6Day 7Day 8Day 9Day 10 Slides Demonstrate use of plaster fabric Follow the steps to create a plaster mask Slide 41 Paint masks Slide Demonstrate gluing methods for adding collage elements to masks Work on masks Slide Finish masks Add straps or handles Make Gallery Cards Fill out Assessment Guide Slides Fill out Self- Critique Rewrite self-critique on form as an Artist’s Statement Display work ©

12 M ATERIALS AND E QUIPMENT Plaster Wrap: available from art and craft stores. Cut into 1”x3” strips. Headbands and bandanas Petroleum jelly or hand lotion Scissors, white glue Water containers Tempera or acrylic paint and brushes Collage materials such as raffia, pine cones, fabric, dried twigs, jute, yarn, feathers, shells 12 © 2009

13 A RT W ORDS I NTRODUCE VOCABULARY AS YOU BEGIN THE PROJECT. R EINFORCE TERMS DURING A RT S TART ACTIVITIES. I NVITE STUDENTS TO WRITE VOCABULARY WORDS AND DEFINITIONS IN THEIR SKETCHBOOK. E NCOURAGE STUDENTS TO USE A RT W ORDS AS THEY ANSWER JOURNAL RESPONSES AND DISCUSS ART WORK. © Mixed-media A work of art that combines two or more of the traditional art media such as paint, fiber and ceramics. Design An organized plan or pattern. Also, an element or component of a decorative pattern. Proportion An element of art that describes the size, location or quantity of one element to another in a work of art. Variety A principle of design. Visual interest is created when elements such as shape, or color shift or change in relation to themselves. Emphasis The way in which the elements of art are used to focus the viewer’s attention on particular parts of the composition. Symmetry A principle of design in which an element or object on one side balances out something on the other side. 13

14 S TUDENT G ALLERY Aaron’s mysterious mask 14 © 2009

15 FLIGHT OF FANCY Some students are comfortable with a full face mask. Other’s choose to make a half mask. 15 © 2009

16 HARLEQUIN This student chose to decorate her mask with careful detailed paint. 16 © 2009

17 NIGHT AND DAY Karlie’s colorful mask contrasts night and day. 17 © 2009

18 SUPERHERO MAN Juan’s mask is stunning in its simplicity. 18 © 2009

19 LASHES Kenna emphasized the eyelashes and lips with contrasting colors. 19 © 2009

20 R EVEAL /C ONCEAL : P LASTER M ASKS Student Section ©

21 T HE P ROJECT M AKE A M ASK Using plaster cloth, paint and collage items such as shells, beads and feathers you will create a “life mask” cast from your face. ©

22 W HAT YOU WILL L EARN You will learn about art, yourself and the world in this unit. You will also have fun! Write each “I Can” statement in your sketchbooks as you gain new skills.. I CAN: Compare the characteristics of two different masks from Africa. Describe the traditional uses of masks in three different tribes of Africa. Use plaster cloth, paint and collage materials to create a mask. Apply the elements of DESIGN: proportion, emphasis and symmetry in my mask. Choose a subject, symbols and themes to communicate a “big idea” in my artwork. Evaluate my artwork in a written critique using three vocabulary terms. 22 © 2009

23 23 R EVEAL / C ONCEAL : P LASTER M ASKS N AME W HAT YOU WILL L EARN D IRECTIONS : Y OU WILL LEARN ABOUT ART, YOURSELF AND THE WORLD IN THIS UNIT. Y OU WILL ALSO HAVE FUN ! C HECK OFF EACH “I C AN ” STATEMENT AS YOU GAIN NEW SKILLS. I CAN: o compare the characteristics of two different masks from Africa. o describe the traditional uses of masks in three different tribes of Africa. o use plaster cloth, paint and collage materials to create a mask o apply the elements of DESIGN: proportion, emphasis and symmetry in creating my mask. o Choose a subject, symbols and themes to communicate a “big idea” in my artwork. o evaluate my artwork in a written critique using three vocabulary terms.

24 A RT W ORDS WRITE VOCABULARY WORDS AND DEFINITIONS IN YOUR SKETCHBOOK. U SE A RT W ORDS AS YOU RESPOND TO JOURNAL RESPONSES AND DISCUSS ART WORK. © Mixed-media A work of art that combines two or more traditional art media such as paint or ceramics. Design An organized plan or pattern - an element or component of a decorative pattern. Proportion describes the size, location or quantity of one element to another. Variety A principle of design - interest is created when elements such as shape, or color shift or change in relation to themselves. Emphasis The way in which the elements are used to focus the viewer’s attention on parts of the composition. Symmetry A principle of design in which an element or object on one side balances out the other side. 24

25 H OW CAN MASKS BOTH CONCEAL AND REVEAL ? Guiding Question ©

26 A RT S TART #1 © Use marker. Design a mask that reveals an inner characteristic about yourself. Design a mask that conceals a truth about yourself. 26

27 D ESCRIBE AN INNER TRUTH ABOUT YOURSELF THAT A MASK COULD REVEAL Brainstorm Activity Journal response #1 ©

28 A RT S TART #2 © Cut out several different size faces from magazines. Choose a large face as your base image. Glue this into your sketchbook. Cut out features such as eyes, ears, nose, mouth and hair from the other images. Choose a VARIETY of sizes. Glue new features onto your base image. Notice how changing the PROPORTION of features creates an interesting and expressive effect. 28

29 F IND OUT A BOUT A FRICAN M ASKS W ORK WITH A PARTNER. G O TO HTTP :// CTI. ITC. VIRGINIA. EDU /~ BCR /A FRICAN _M ASK. HTML B AYLY A RT M USEUM, U NIVERSITY OF V IRGINIA, TO LEARN MORE ABOUT A FRICAN M ASKS. C LICK ON THE LINKS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE TO FIND MASKS IN DIFFERENT CATEGORIES. F ILL OUT THE CHART BELOW. HTTP :// CTI. ITC. VIRGINIA. EDU /~ BCR /A FRICAN _M ASK. HTML Sketch a maskCountry/ region and tribal group MaterialsUses © Name 29

30 © F IND OUT A BOUT A FRICAN M ASKS W ORK WITH A PARTNER. G O TO HTTP :// CTI. ITC. VIRGINIA. EDU /~ BCR /A FRICAN _M ASK. HTML B AYLY A RT M USEUM, U NIVERSITY OF V IRGINIA, TO LEARN MORE ABOUT A FRICAN M ASKS. C LICK ON THE LINKS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE TO FIND MASKS IN DIFFERENT CATEGORIES. F ILL OUT THE CHART BELOW. HTTP :// CTI. ITC. VIRGINIA. EDU /~ BCR /A FRICAN _M ASK. HTML Sketch a maskCountry/ region and tribal group MaterialsUses Name

31 A RT S TART #3 © Look at some pictures of African Masks in books or on the internet. Use a fine point black marker. Draw a simple line DESIGN for a full face mask. Finish with a watercolor wash. 31

32 A RT S TART #4 © Sketch a few ideas for the mask you will make. Use markers. Choose the facial feature, emotion or idea that you will EMPHASIZE. Will you use color, proportion, texture, shape or some other element to create emphasis? Gather ideas from the masks you looked at during your internet research. 32

33 D ESCRIBE HOW YOUR MASK WILL REVEAL AN INNER QUALITY OR CHARACTERISTIC ABOUT YOURSELF Journal Response #2 ©

34 L ET ’ S G ET S TARTED ON THE A RT P ROJECT Follow the steps outlined in the next few slides to create your own plaster face mask. ©

35 S TEP O NE G ET READY ! © Choose a partner. Use a bandana or wide elastic headband to hold your hair back off your forehead and face. Spread petroleum jelly on your forehead, along your hairline and over your cheeks and the bridge of your nose. Be careful not to get it in your eyes! Put strips of 1”x3” plaster cloth in a plastic bag. Fill a container halfway with water. Lie down on a comfortable surface and your partner will do the next steps! 35

36 S TEP T WO A PPLY PLASTER CLOTH © Dip a strip of plaster cloth into the water. Lift it out over your water container and let it drip a moment. Gently use two fingers to squeegee off extra water. Place the strip flat on your partner’s face. 36

37 S TEP T HREE C ONTINUE PLACING PLASTER CLOTH © Place strips across the forehead, down the length of the nose and around the eyes. Fold or overlap the cloth to fit the shape of the face. Be very careful not to drip into your partners eyes! If you are making a full face mask do the mouth last and leave the area around the nostrils open for breathing! 37

38 S TEP F OUR C OMPLETING THE PLASTER WORK © After placing each plaster cloth strip rub gently to release the plaster and smooth the surface. Build up about 3-4 layers of cloth as you shape the mask. Be careful when working near the eyes! 38

39 S TEP F IVE L ET PLASTER HARDEN © While your partner waits for the plaster to harden clean up the work area. When the mask is hard to the touch gently help your partner pull it off. Your partner should then wash his or her face thoroughly and may want to apply skin lotion. 39

40 S TEP S IX S TORE YOUR MASK © Write your name and class hour on the inside in water base marker. Put your mask on a counter or shelf where it won’t be disturbed. Let it continue to harder and dry overnight. 40

41 S TEP S EVEN T RIM AND P AINT © Think about the colors and shapes you will use to express your big idea: What will your mask reveal about you? What might it conceal? Which features will you choose to EMPHASIZE? How will you do this? Use scissors to trim any uneven edges and loose threads on your mask. Gather together your supplies: paints, brushes water and newspaper. Paint your mask! 41

42 S TEP E IGHT G ATHER COLLAGE MATERIALS © Gather a variety of objects to add detail and texture to your mask. Beads, buttons, fabric scraps, yarn, twine, shells, dried grass and twigs all make fabulous additions to masks!

43 S TEP N INE A DDING D ETAILS © Add details to your mask. For fabric and other porous items, such as feathers or pom-poms use a thin layer of white craft glue. Less glue really is stickier! Hold the item in place while you count slowly to 60. As you work be careful not to disturb previously glued items. They really won’t be thoroughly dry for several hours. For non-porous items such as a button or bead to adhere to your mask you will need to use more glue. Spread a thick bead of glue where the item rests on the mask. Set the item into the glue. It will need to dry overnight for the glue to really stick, so move your mask carefully when it’s time to put it away! 43

44 S TEP T EN M AKE A HANDLE OR STRAP © Drill small holes on each side just under the eye openings for yarn, ribbon or cord. Use a craft knife or scissor end and simply twist, pushing gently into the plaster until you form a small hole. 44

45 M AKE A G ALLERY C ARD Directions: Make a gallery card to put next to your mask in a display case or bulletin board. Fold an unlined index card or piece of card stock in half so that it will stand up like a tent. Write the following information on your gallery card in dark or colorful marker. Title Artist’s Name Medium (materials you used in your art) Date ©

46 I NTERACTIVE A SSESSMENT G UIDE D IRECTIONS : C IRCLE EACH CATEGORY WHERE YOU FEEL YOU HAVE EARNED A “3”. F OR EACH CATEGORY WHERE YOU FEEL YOU HAVE EARNED A 1 OR 2 MAKE NOTES IN THE BOXES TO EXPLAIN WHY. ©

47 © Reveal/Conceal Plaster Masks 3 Wow All Criteria Met 2 Good Job! Most Criteria Met 1 Keep Trying! Some Criteria Met Sketchbook I Completed 4 Art Starts with care and attention to detail. I Completed journal response #1 & 2 thoughtfully and neatly. Mask Design My mask clearly emphasizes one feature. Color and pattern is used to express ideas. Collage items enhance the overall design. Craftsmanship Edges of mask are trimmed smoothly. Painted surface is smooth and adequately covers plaster. Collage items are glued securely. Effort I always used class time wisely. I completed each part of the assignment to the best of my ability. Citizenship I was careful with supplies and equipment. I cleaned up after myself and helped others. My attitude was enthusiastic and respectful. I NTERACTIVE A SSESSMENT G UIDE N AME D IRECTIONS : C IRCLE EACH CATEGORY WHERE YOU FEEL YOU HAVE EARNED A “3”. F OR EACH CATEGORY WHERE YOU FEEL YOU HAVE EARNED A 1 OR 2 MAKE NOTES IN THE BOXES TO EXPLAIN WHY

48 A RT S ELF -C RITIQUE (K RI - TEEK : TO DISCUSS A CREATIVE WORK GIVING AN ASSESSMENT OF ITS SUCCESSFUL QUALITIES.) Directions: Look carefully at YOUR work of art. Answer each question in complete sentences. Use four vocabulary terms: design, proportion symmetry, mixed-media, variety, emphasis. Circle each term you use. 1. Describe your artwork. Tell about the materials you used, include information about color, proportion, pattern and texture. 2. What are some of the challenges you faced in completing your mask? What did you learn from this project? 3. Choose an element or principle of art that is used successfully. How has it contributed to your artwork? ©

49 © A RT S ELF -C RITIQUE (K RI - TEEK : TO DISCUSS A CREATIVE WORK GIVING AN ASSESSMENT OF ITS SUCCESSFUL QUALITIES.) Directions: Look carefully at YOUR work of art. Answer each question in complete sentences. Use four vocabulary terms: design, proportion symmetry, mixed-media, variety, emphasis. Circle each term you use. 1. Describe your artwork. Tell about the materials you used, include information about color, proportion, pattern and texture. 2. What are some of the challenges you faced in completing your mask? What did you learn from this project? 3. Choose an element or principle of art that is used successfully. How has it contributed to your artwork?

50 © Artist’s Statement by

51 T HE E ND © Thank you for using this FunArtLessons.com Art Unit!


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