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Journalism 2001: Reporting and Writing I Week One September 13, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "Journalism 2001: Reporting and Writing I Week One September 13, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Journalism 2001: Reporting and Writing I Week One September 13, 2010

2 Words Matter!

3 Are you ready to work! You’ll be a better writer/communicator at the end of this class … You’ll be a better writer/communicator at the end of this class …

4 Announcements Attendance! Attendance! Name cards Name cards Composition prerequisite Composition prerequisite –Comp 1120 If drop any classes, 100% tuition refund if dropped by September 14 If drop any classes, 100% tuition refund if dropped by September 14 –Drops to 75% Drops to 75%Drops to 75%

5 Introductions Instructor: Lucy Kragness Instructor: Lucy Kragness –University of Minnesota Duluth Experience  3/96 to present: Assistant to the Chancellor  1/05 to present: Jour 2001 instructor  1/09 to present: Jour 2300 instructor (News Photography)  10/90 to 3/96: Alumni Director, University Relations  8/90 to 10/90: Acting Director, Alumni and Media Relations  11/84 to 10/90: Publications Director, Alumni and Media Relations  3/89 to 5/94: Taught Publications Editing, a three-credit spring quarter journalism course  6/85 to 6/90: Volunteer editorial adviser, Statesman student newspaper –Freelance Experience:  7/86 to present: Freelance writer, photographer for several regional and national publications

6 –Newspaper Experience:  9/83 to 9/84: One-person bureau in Sheridan, Wyo., for the Billings Gazette in Billings, Mont.  3/81 to 9/83: Assistant state editor at the Billings Gazette in Billings, Mont.  3/80 to 3/81: Managing editor of the Williston Daily Herald, Plains Reporter (weekly) and the Williston Basin Reporter (bi- weekly), all in Williston, N.D.  11/79 to 3/80: Assistant managing editor/Sunday editor at the Williston Daily Herald  6/79 to 11/79: Reporter, business editor at the Williston Daily Herald  11/78 to 6/79: Assistant editor at the Northeaster newspaper in Minneapolis. –Education:  Master of Education in Educational Computing and Technology, University of Minnesota Duluth,  Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of Minnesota Minneapolis, –Personal:  Married, two grown stepchildren, grandma!

7 Remember this photo….

8 Who are you??

9 Let’s look at syllabus

10 Office Hours: 502 Darland Mondays between 4-5 p.m. Mondays between 4-5 p.m. Before/after class Before/after class By appointment By appointment

11 Texts Inside Reporting, Tim Harrower Inside Reporting, Tim Harrower Associated Press Stylebook Associated Press Stylebook

12 Course description First course for Writing Studies journalism major/minor First course for Writing Studies journalism major/minor Basic news reporting/writing Basic news reporting/writing

13 Student Responsibilities Mandatory attendance Mandatory attendance –Please arrive on time –Turn off cell phones –Avoid surfing the Internet! –Respect classmates/instructor Weekly writing/editing assignments Weekly writing/editing assignments In-class assignments In-class assignments Class participation Class participation Snowy? Call UMD snow hotline: 726-SNOW Snowy? Call UMD snow hotline: 726-SNOW Current event/textbook quizzes Current event/textbook quizzes Bring fully charged laptop to class each week Bring fully charged laptop to class each week

14 Daily reading of the Duluth News-Tribune Daily reading of the Duluth News-TribuneDuluth News-TribuneDuluth News-Tribune  Front page, opinion, local news, sports  Subscription specials through Newspaper Lady –$1 week, easy pay available –Call Paula at  Sign up for news alerts Weekly reading of the Statesman Weekly reading of the StatesmanStatesman Daily viewing of a local news program Daily viewing of a local news program –WDIO-TV: Channel 10 (Charter Channel 13) WDIO-TV  ABC affiliate –KDLH-TV : Channel 3 (Charter Channel 4) KDLH-TV  CBS Affiliate –KBJR-TV: Channel 6 (Charter Channel 5) KBJR-TV  NBC Affiliate –KQDS Channel 21 KQDS Channel 21KQDS Channel 21 What’s the connection between KDLH/KBJR? What’s the connection between KQDS 21 and the Duluth News- Tribune?

15 Final Project: Due December 17 Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. –Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.jsp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.jsp

16 Grading Major writing assignments: 28% Major writing assignments: 28% In-class assignments: 24% In-class assignments: 24% –Lowest assignment dropped Weekly assignments: 24% Weekly assignments: 24% –Lowest assignment dropped Class participation: 13% Class participation: 13% Final project: 3% Final project: 3% Final exam: 4% Final exam: 4% Story pitches: 4% Story pitches: 4% Egradebook: Egradebook: –http://www.d.umn.edu/egradebook

17 Extra Credit Article published: 10 points Article published: 10 points –Need prior approval Letter to the Editor published: 10 points Letter to the Editor published: 10 points –Duluth News-Tribune –Minneapolis Star-Tribune –St. Paul Pioneer Press Media tours: 10 points Media tours: 10 points Other: Arranged Other: Arranged

18 Late assignments Journalism definition: Journalism definition: –The collection and editing of news for presentation through the media Old news = no news: Old news = no news: –No late assignments!

19 Internships Internships key to journalism positions Internships key to journalism positions Marty Sozansky, Department of Writing Studies, coordinates internships Marty Sozansky, Department of Writing Studies, coordinates internships

20 Student Academic Integrity Policy Academic dishonesty tarnishes UMD's reputation and discredits the accomplishment of students. The Student Academic Integrity Policy (http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/integrity/stude nt.html) enables UMD to have a consistent, clear-cut process in place for the reporting of offenses. The main objective is to have a central reporting office on campus, which will allow repeat offenders to be identified. To be fair and equitable to students, reporting to the academic integrity officer is mandatory. Records maintained by the academic integrity officer are confidential and are protected by federal law. Academic dishonesty tarnishes UMD's reputation and discredits the accomplishment of students. The Student Academic Integrity Policy (http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/integrity/stude nt.html) enables UMD to have a consistent, clear-cut process in place for the reporting of offenses. The main objective is to have a central reporting office on campus, which will allow repeat offenders to be identified. To be fair and equitable to students, reporting to the academic integrity officer is mandatory. Records maintained by the academic integrity officer are confidential and are protected by federal law.http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/integrity/stude nt.htmlhttp://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/integrity/stude nt.html

21 Student Conduct Code The instructor will enforce and students are expected to follow the University’s Student Conduct Code (http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/code). Appropriate classroom conduct promotes an environment of academic achievement and integrity. Disruptive classroom behavior that substantially or repeatedly interrupts either the instructor’s ability to teach, or student learning, is prohibited. The instructor will enforce and students are expected to follow the University’s Student Conduct Code (http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/code). Appropriate classroom conduct promotes an environment of academic achievement and integrity. Disruptive classroom behavior that substantially or repeatedly interrupts either the instructor’s ability to teach, or student learning, is prohibited.http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/code

22 Students with Disabilities It is the policy and practice of the University of Minnesota Duluth to create inclusive learning environments for all students, including students with disabilities. If there are aspects of this course that result in barriers to your inclusion or your ability to meet course requirements – such as time limited exams, inaccessible web content, or the use of non-captioned videos – please notify the instructor as soon as possible. You are also encouraged to contact the Office of Disability Resources to discuss and arrange reasonable accommodations. Please call or visit the DR website at for more information. It is the policy and practice of the University of Minnesota Duluth to create inclusive learning environments for all students, including students with disabilities. If there are aspects of this course that result in barriers to your inclusion or your ability to meet course requirements – such as time limited exams, inaccessible web content, or the use of non-captioned videos – please notify the instructor as soon as possible. You are also encouraged to contact the Office of Disability Resources to discuss and arrange reasonable accommodations. Please call or visit the DR website at for more information.

23 Safety and Security at UMD The University of Minnesota Duluth is committed to the safety and security of its students, faculty, and staff. Many people have been involved in planning and implementing a variety of approaches to campus safety. This Web site (http://www.d.umn.edu/emergency/) provides information about how UMD prepares for and responds to safety, health, and weather emergencies. Be aware and be safe. The University of Minnesota Duluth is committed to the safety and security of its students, faculty, and staff. Many people have been involved in planning and implementing a variety of approaches to campus safety. This Web site (http://www.d.umn.edu/emergency/) provides information about how UMD prepares for and responds to safety, health, and weather emergencies. Be aware and be safe.http://www.d.umn.edu/emergency/

24 How will the class work? Weekly reading assignments Weekly reading assignments In-class assignments In-class assignments Weekly out-of-class assignments Weekly out-of-class assignments Major reporting assignments Major reporting assignments Current event quizzes Current event quizzes –A journalist must follow the news! Textbook quizzes Textbook quizzes All assignments need to be completed in Microsoft Word and sent as an attachment to: A printed copy of noted assignments are also due before class begins. Double spaced, 12 point type, Times Roman A printed copy of noted assignments are also due before class begins. Double spaced, 12 point type, Times Roman

25 Let’s look at List of Assignments

26 October 25: Important! Class will be attending Duluth City Council meeting on Monday, October 25 Class will be attending Duluth City Council meeting on Monday, October 25 If miss that class, miss Hard News 2 assignment! If miss that class, miss Hard News 2 assignment!

27 Questions about syllabus? Syllabus, assignments, lectures at:

28 Let’s practice Connect to UMD Wireless Access Connect to UMD Wireless Access –http://www.d.umn.edu/itss/computing/wireless/ Microsoft Word available almost free to all students: Microsoft Word available almost free to all students: –http://www.d.umn.edu/itss/software/ Open Microsoft Word Open Microsoft Word  Open blank file  Type: testing  Save file to desktop as: Class test Open Mail Program Open Mail Program  New message  Send to this address:  Copy yourself: Add cc:  Attach file  Send!

29 Words matter!

30 We’ll focus on local issues

31 Who is the current mayor of Duluth? 1. Don Ness 2. Herb Bergson 3. Gary Doty

32 When was Don Ness elected mayor? 1. Two years ago 2. Three years ago 3. Last November

33 Is Mayor Ness a graduate of UMD? 1. Yes 2. No

34 As a student at UMD, Don Ness was ___________. 1. Captain of the UMD basketball team 2. Editor of the Statesman 3. Student Association President

35 What election is this November? 1. U.S. Senator 2. Minnesota governor 3. Duluth mayor

36 Who won the DFL primary? 1. Matt Entenza 2. Mark Dayton 3. Margaret Kelliher

37 Yvonne Prettner Solon is running for lieutenant governor with which candidate? 1. Matt Entenza 2. Mark Dayton 3. Margaret Kelliher

38 Where is Yvonne Prettner Solon from? 1. Rochester 2. Minneapolis 3. Duluth

39 What’s Yvonne Prettner Solon’s link to UMD? 1. Solon Campus Center named after her husband, Sen. Sam Solon 2. She is a UMD graduate 3. All of the above

40 The Duluth Public Schools system is undergoing a reorganization process. What is it called? 1. Time for change 2. The Red Plan 3. Zenith City Plan

41 Duluth voters approved the Red Plan for reorganization of the Duluth Public Schools. 1. Yes 2. No

42 What UMD administrator was featured in a story in today’s Duluth News Tribune? 1. Kathryn Martin 2. Scott Sandelin 3. Bob Nielson

43

44 Chapter 1: The Story of Journalism Remembering 9/11 Remembering 9/11 –Moment of silence Where were you on 9/11? Where were you on 9/11? How did you hear the news? How did you hear the news? News events help define generations News events help define generations

45 Journalism skills helped these UMD alumni succeed Newspapers Newspapers –Sarah Doty, Rochester Post-Bulletin –Jim Heffernan, former opinion editor, Duluth News- Tribune –Tim Franklin, publisher of the Hinckley News, Pine County Courier (former Statesman editor, editor/reporter in Cloquet, Grand Marais, Duluth) TV news reporters TV news reporters –Dennis Anderson, anchor for WDIO-TV –Joel Runck, former reporter for KBJR-TV –Kyle Underwood, former WDIO-TV Kyle Underwood, former WDIO-TVKyle Underwood, former WDIO-TV

46 Public relations Public relations  Susan Latto, UMD Public Relations Director  Amy Rutledge, communications manager for Minnesota Power, former anchor for KDLH-TV and Sports Information Sports Information  Bob Nygaard, UMD Sports Information Director Grant writers/non-profit organizations Grant writers/non-profit organizations  Cindy Finch, Woodland Hills Advertising Advertising  John Hyduke, Westmoreland Flint Government relations Government relations  Julene Boe, St. Louis River Alliance/City of Duluth  Jess Myers, Minnesota Senate Office/former Hockey News

47 “It's impossible to teach anyone to be a journalist because most of the skills necessary to be a good journalist — an insatiable curiosity, a tenacity for the truth and a love of words — must be developed within. Those of us who have chosen to teach journalism don't really teach, we merely light the way.” — Prof. Malcolm Gibson, College Program Guide, published by The New York Times Co. — Prof. Malcolm Gibson, College Program Guide, published by The New York Times Co.

48 Mark Twain ( ) Mark Twain ( ) Humorist and novelistHumorist and novelist 5 Legendary journalists Newsroom heroes, legends and folklore Nellie Bly ( ) Nellie Bly ( ) “Best reporter in America” in late 1800s“Best reporter in America” in late 1800s H. L. Mencken ( ) H. L. Mencken ( ) Timeless, biting, quotable social commentaryTimeless, biting, quotable social commentary

49 Ernest Hemingway ( ) Ernest Hemingway ( ) Legendary American novelistLegendary American novelist Started as reporterStarted as reporter 5 Legendary journalists Newsroom heroes, legends and folklore Hunter S. Thompson ( ) Hunter S. Thompson ( ) “Gonzo” journalism“Gonzo” journalism Dangerous, wrong and entertainingDangerous, wrong and entertaining

50 –Female reporters are gutsy, idealistic, beautiful and single.  Male reporters are surly, cynical loners. –Reporters routinely solve mysteries. –Reporters ambush, dodge, shout. –Reporters drink at their desks. –Reporters have a liberal bias. 5 Myths about reporters

51 5 Fictional newsroom characters –Clark Kent  Daily Planet reporter and Superman –Lois Lane  Ace reporter and Superman’s girlfriend –Lou Grant  Surly, burly, gruff- but-lovable –Brenda Starr  1940s strong female comic hero –Jimmy  Fabricated character that helped Janet Cooke win Pulitzer Prize in 1980s

52 Every culture seeks ways to spread the news The birth of journalism  Ancient clay tablets  Roman newsletters  Wandering minstrels

53 Reporting becomes disciplined craft –Emergence of penny press  Marketed to masses  New York Sun –1833 –Innovations in printing –Rise of modern newsroom News in the 19 th century Bennett crafts new style of journalism  New York Herald – 1835  Biggest in world by midcentury

54 Yellow journalism’s golden age –Loud headlines –Sensational stories on sin and sex –Lavish use of pictures  Often faked News in the 19 th century –Sunday supplements  Comics and features –Rumors disguised as news  Led to war with Spain

55 Yellow journalism –Horace Greely  Liberal, crusading social reformer –Henry Raymond  NY Times News in the 19 th century –Joseph Pulitzer  The World –William Randolph Hearst  New York Journal

56 Pulitzer spreads crusading influence –The World  Transcended yellow journalism  Launched crusades against corruption in government, business News in the modern age –Funded one of 1 st schools of journalism  Columbia University –Established Pulitzer Prizes  Encourage journalistic excellence

57 Radio, TV bring end to newspaper’s media monopoly –Competition too appealing  Radio had sound and music  Movie newsreels added faces to voices  By 1950, television  Now, Internet News in the modern age Newspapers respond  Tighter writing  Better formatting  Improved design  Corporate consolidation

58 Radio, TV and the Newspaper –Radio rules airwaves  1927 – 30 million listen to Lindberg’s homecoming  1 st 24-hour news coverage News in the modern age –Television news comes of age  1963 – Kennedy assassination

59 –Inverted pyramid –No longer Americans’ first, or favorite, source of news –More facts; less sensationalism –More readable Radio, TV and the Newspaper Meanwhile, back at the newspaper… News in the modern age

60 Local TV news Local TV news Radio news Radio news Local newspaper Local newspaper Web site Web site National TV news National TV news Whom do YOU believe when you hear conflicting versions of a news story? News in the modern age

61 Chapter 2 How the Newsroom Works

62 Ingredients of News What is news? What is news? –Folklore definition:  North  East  West  South Let’s hear your definitions…

63 Dictionary definition of news Merriam Webster Online Definition: 1 a : a report of recent events b : previously unknown information 2 a : material reported in a newspaper or news periodical or on a newscast b : matter that is newsworthy

64 What is hard news? 1. Timely events reported almost automatically by the media. 2. Events not usually considered immediately important or timely to a wide audience.

65 Are these hard news or soft news? Car wash by fourth graders to raise money for a classmate with cancer Car wash by fourth graders to raise money for a classmate with cancer Murder in Lakeside Murder in Lakeside High wind creating surf conditions for wind surfers High wind creating surf conditions for wind surfers City council meeting City council meeting Strike by AFSCME Strike by AFSCME

66 Hard News Murders Murders City Council meetings City Council meetings Government meetings Government meetings Not always bad news: major announcements Not always bad news: major announcements Soft News Retirements Retirements School programs School programs Human interest Human interest

67 Convergence Collaboration between newspapers, TV and Internet Collaboration between newspapers, TV and Internet –KDLH/Duluth News Tribune –Newspaper reporter/radio reporter

68 What does it mean for a journalist to be objective? Let’s hear your definitions Let’s hear your definitions

69 A subjective/objective business Journalist’s feelings, thoughts, experiences influence a story Journalist’s feelings, thoughts, experiences influence a story Objectivity key to respect of media Objectivity key to respect of media What’s a gatekeeper? What’s a gatekeeper? –Editors, reporters, sources –Big responsibility: Deciding what’s news Evolving process Evolving process –Editor/reporter tap dance

70 What makes news? Immediacy Immediacy –Train derailment Proximity Proximity Conflict Conflict Prominence Prominence Consequence Consequence Novelty Novelty Impact Impact Emotions/Human Interest Emotions/Human Interest

71 What is news?  They prefer news about serious issues and major events.63%  They prefer crime and celebrity news.24%  The media is out of touch with average Americans.48%  They find the news depressing.84%  They find the news negative.77%  They find the news sensational.58% News by the numbers –Americans who say:

72 What is news?  Have little or no interest in politics.42% –Journalists who say:  They often avoid running stories readers think are important but dull.77%  They sometimes ignore stories because readers might find them too complex. 52% News by the numbers –Americans under the age of 30 who say they:

73 What is news? –The Metropolitan Daily  Lots of pages to fill with range of topics  Local to global –The Community Weekly  Limited space  Tight regional focus –The Twice-Weekly Campus Paper  Space very tight  Stories focus on campus events and culture News depends on the newspaper

74 What readers want –We ask them. –We watch them.  Focus groups  Phone, mail and Web surveys  Monitoring devices So how do we know what readers read? And more  Ethnography  Sales/Web views  Reader response  Anecdotal feedback

75 What readers want –Readers are in a hurry. –Readers have short attention spans. –Readers want stories that connect. Things every reporter needs to remember about readers 5 –Readers want stories told in a compelling way. –There’s more than just one type of reader.

76 What readers want –Spend 90% of time chasing a story, and 10% writing it. –Not everything a reporter hears makes it into the finished story. How a story gets written –Not everything is as it seems.

77 Newspaper Editorial Organization Managing Editor Sports Editor Lifestyle Editor City EditorNews Editor State Editor Sports Reporters Lifestyle Reporters Copy editors Chief photographer Photographer Reporters

78 Other Newspaper Departments Advertising Advertising –Local display –Classified –National –Advertising art –Ad promotion –Public relations –Community relations Circulation Circulation –Mail room –Delivery Business Business –Accounting –Billing –Credit –Payroll –Credit union –Labor Relations Production Production –Composing –Platemaking –Camera –Data processing –Press

79 What goes in the newspaper Daily editorial meeting Daily editorial meeting –Editors make story pitches –Editor/managing editor makes final decision –Photography or graphic assignments finalized Deadlines for multiple editions Deadlines for multiple editions

80 General assignment reporters General assignment reporters  Spot news  Night reporter Beat reporters Beat reporters  Education  Crime/courts  Government: city, county, regional, state, national Specialty reporters Specialty reporters  Multicultural  Family  Taste  Business How reporters cover the news

81 –Major divisions  Advertising department  Production department  Circulation department How the news comes together –Reporters and editors –Copy editors and presentation –Editorial board –Photo and graphics Inside the Oregonian newsroom Inside the Oregonian newsroom

82 How the news comes together Inside the Oregonian newsroom Inside the Oregonian newsroom

83 How the news comes together Inside the Oregonian newsroom Inside the Oregonian newsroom

84 Who’s who in the newsroom –At most papers, writers are either:  General assignment reporters – cover wide range of stories.  Beat reporters – cover a specific topic. Clear lines of authority avoid chaos Some news- rooms now organize staffers in teams to encourage them to work together.

85 What it’s called –Daily – printed every day. –Weekly – printed once a week. –Newsletter – printed once a month. Talk the talk –Mainstream newspaper (The New York Times) –Alternative press (The Village Voice) –Specialty publication (Fur & Feather Magazine)

86 What it’s called –Broadsheet – large format page –Tabloid – half the size of a broadsheet Talk the Talk –Stories can be spiked or killed. –Writers can create a thumbsucker or a goat- choker. –Editors can trim or cut a few graphs and butcher or bury stories.

87 What it’s called Parts of a story –Photo –Byline –Dateline –Lead –Quote –Attribution –Photo credit –Liftout quote –Tagline –Headline

88 What it’s called –Flag  Name of paper set in special type.  Never changes. –Edition  Daily papers often print street sales and home delivery editions. The parts of a page –Infographic  Informational graphics.  Display key facts. –Deck  Subheadline.  Written by copy editors.

89 What it’s called –Text  Story measured in inches. –Jump line  Tells readers where story continues, or jumps. The parts of a page –Cutline  Caption.  Written by copy editors or reporters. –Teaser  Promo or skybox.  Captures readers’ attention to highlight story in issue.

90 What it’s called –Refer  Alerts readers to another story related to topic. –Wire story  Story written by reporter working for another paper or national wire service. The parts of a page –Mug shot  Closeup photo of someone’s face.  Usually small. –Centerpiece  Lead story.

91 Tools, talent & temperament –Notebook  Use spiral-bound pads. –Tape recorder  Know the laws. –Computer  Learn to type. The basic hardware: The tools every reporter needs –Camera  Carry extra batteries. –Telephone  Think cell phones that take pictures.

92 Words matter!

93 Let’s look at Duluth News-Tribune

94 Assignments for 9/20: Using the Thursday (September 16, 2010) Duluth News- Tribune, list the stories on the front page, local section and the sports page. Determine if the stories where selected on the traditional news elements of: Using the Thursday (September 16, 2010) Duluth News- Tribune, list the stories on the front page, local section and the sports page. Determine if the stories where selected on the traditional news elements of: –Impact –Immediacy –Proximity/relevance –Conflict –Prominence –Novelty –Emotions/Human Interest Keep evaluations brief: no more than three sentences each. Bring PRINTED copy of evaluations to class on Monday, September 20. Double spaced, Times Roman font, 12 point.

95 Textbook Quiz Textbook Quiz –To help reinforce what you have read, you will have a take-home quiz about the textbook reading –Turn quiz in next Monday, September 20

96 How to use AP Stylebook Stylebook Key Stylebook Key –Addresses:  Is this correct? 25 East Silver St. –Spellings:  Adviser/advisor; Legislative titles Sports Guidelines and Style Sports Guidelines and Style Business Guidelines and Style Business Guidelines and Style A Guide to Punctuation A Guide to Punctuation Editing Marks Editing Marks

97 Don’t memorize, familiarize!

98 Today’s assignment AP Stylebook editing practice AP Stylebook editing practice Prepare a Microsoft word file with the following information and send it as an attachment to: Prepare a Microsoft word file with the following information and send it as an attachment to: –Your name, hometown –Your year at UMD –Your major/minor –Your career goals –Journalism experience (OK if none!) –What you hope to get out of this class –Anything else you’d like me to know


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