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Summit Hill Elementary Art EDventures

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1 Summit Hill Elementary Art EDventures
“Bandolier Bags & Beads” 2nd Grade/Southeastern Woodland Indians Martha Berry Brought to you by S.H.E. PTA

2 Meet Martha Berry “Art is long and time is fleeting.”
Speaker Notes: Quote from Martha Berry Interview: To me it means that the inspiration and beauty of art lasts long after the artist and his or her time has passed. But, it also describes the frustration of having so many ideas popping into your head and just not having the time to create them all. For me, bead work is very time consuming. I happen to enjoy that, getting lost in the detail of a piece of beadwork, etc. But, if I worked around the clock for the rest of my life, I could never get all the ideas beaded.” Award-Winning Cherokee Beadwork Artist “Art is long and time is fleeting.” Registered tribal citizen of the Cherokee Nation

3 with Little Miss Cherokee 2007
Cherokee Roots Martha Berry’s mother and grandmother were from the Cherokee Nation of Native Americans. They began teaching her how to use a needle and thread when she was just five. By age nine, she was making her own clothes! As a grown woman, Martha was asked by a Cherokee Chief to use her sewing talents to save their beading traditions. She was flattered and concerned to find that there were only a handful of beadwork artists within the entire Cherokee community of 350,000 people. Speaker Notes: Martha Berry with Little Miss Cherokee 2007

4 Native Nations Martha spent a long time researching different beading styles and patterns of the Southeastern Woodland Indians; including, the Cherokee, Creek, Seminole and others. In Georgia, the Cherokee were found in the northern part of the state. (hit enter) They lived in large villages and farmed “the three sisters” (maize, beans and squash.) They also gathered berries, nuts and fruit; hunted deer and wild turkey; and fished. (hit enter) Like most Native Americans, the Cherokee used beads in their artwork and clothing and for their trading. The Three Sisters Corn Beans Squash Speaker Notes: Martha looked at old photos of Cherokee’s wearing Bandolier bags in order to find authentic patterns. She even received a special grant to study at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C. in order to be granted access to very valuable Cherokee artifacts and records. The Three Sisters genius- Indians, who companion planted pole beans and squash with corn, using the strength of the sturdy corn stalks to support the twining beans and the shade of the spreading squash vines to trap moisture for the growing crop. The bacterial colonies on the bean roots capture nitrogen from the air, some of which is released into the soil to nourish the high nitrogen needs of the corn.

5 Cherokee Beadwork Early Cherokee beads were carved from things found locally like shells, stones, wood, animal bones even claws! (hit enter) In the 1600’s the Cherokee began trading with European explorers for things they didn’t have like glass beads, steel needles, silk thread, ribbon and new types of cloth. As a result, they began to produce beadwork that was both unique and beautiful. Shell Beads Bone Beads Seed Beads

6 Beading Items Included….
Belts and sashes Moccasins Bandolier Bags Small purses Speaker Notes: Both men and women wore sashes and moccasins. (The beading on the moccasins would be removed and place on new shoes.) However, purses were typically worn by women and bandolier bags by men. Bandolier bags are often incorrectly called a medicine bags. Medicine bags are plain deer skin with no beads. They had small pockets.

7 Can you find the bandolier bags in each photo?
Cherokee Dancers Bandolier bags took a very long time to create and were highly prized items. Perhaps that’s why many Native Americans chose to wear them for photographs. (hit enter for b&w photos) (hit enter for bag I.D.) Can you find the bandolier bags in each photo? (hit enter for b&w photos to exit and color photos to appear!) Speaker Notes: The shoulder-strap pouches called a bandolier bags were fashioned after a type of pouch carried by British soldiers. Woodland Indian men wore bandolier bags as objects of prestige. Sometimes they wore more than one at a time but they always crossed over the shoulder. This kind of bag was so valuable that the Woodlands people could trade one bag to the neighboring Indian Chiefs. Sometimes people mistakenly call them medicine bags. Medicine bags are deerskin and not ornately beaded. When the color photographs appear with men dancing- point out the plain medicine bag on the left compared to the bandolier bag on the right

8 Trail Of Tears Unfortunately, many early Americans had no interest bandolier bags. They wanted the Cherokee’s land for cotton plantations and gold instead. In fact, nearly every Native American tribe east of the Mississippi was forced relocate to Oklahoma. This event was called the Trail of Tears because so many Cherokee’s lost their lives. When they reached Oklahoma, they had to rebuild their lives. However, there was no longer time for beadwork and the tradition was nearly forgotten. Speaker Notes:

9 “Chief’s Bag” Thanks to Martha Berry, old-style Southeastern Woodland beadwork is now enjoying a revival among today’s Cherokee, Creek and Seminole people. These tribes conduct workshops teaching traditional beadwork. Martha has won many awards for her creative designs-especially her bandolier bags. In 2003, Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chadwick “Corntassel” Smith wore this bandolier bag as he took his oath of office. Speaker Notes: You can explain to the kids that the Cherokee Indian Nation is a country within the United States. They run their own government and Chief Smith is like our President.

10 “Hidden In Plain Sight”
Beadwork Symbols Martha’s beadwork often tells the stories of her Cherokee ancestors. This bag, named “Hidden in Plain Sight,” took Martha 283 hours to complete! If you look closely, you can see many sacred Cherokee symbols! (hit enter) ? Can You Find…? Sun Circles-Stand for the light of the sun that circles earth. (hit enter) Four winds- Represent messenger spirits and weather. (hit enter) Crosses- Depict the four directions (north, south, east and west.) (hit enter) Uktena- Is a symbol of the mysterious horned serpent believed to bring rain (hit enter 2xs)

11 (hit enter 2 more times for more!)
“Dance By Numbers” Can you find two, four and seven different symbols in this “Dance by Numbers” bag? The pattern in this bandolier bag reflects the importance of numbers to the Cherokee. Especially the numbers: 2 (hit enter) 4 (hit enter) 7 (hit enter) (hit enter 2 more times for more!) The 7-Point Star This seven pointed star symbol is very special! It stands for the seven Cherokee clans being called together from all directions to dance around the central fire. Speaker Notes: After the kids have guessed where the symbols are in this bandolier bag- hit enter the symbols will be marked. There are also images layered on this slide so after you have guessed and located the sybols hit enter twice and another another symbol will appear. The number meanings: #2 –represents spirit world and earthly world, male and female #4- represents the four directions and four winds (She also used four sacred colors in the 7 pointed-white, black, red and blue that stand for North, South, East and West.) #7-represents the 7 sacred Cherokee clans. It does not represent 7 days of the week for the Cherokee used a 13 day week.

12 Now it’s time to bead like Martha Berry!
Art EDventures Sample Bandolier Bag Now it’s time to bead like Martha Berry! But first you must learn about the Seven Sacred Clans and their colors! Then use your special color and Woodland Indian designs to make a bandolier bag of your very own!

13 Use The Color Of Clans Wolf Clan: Deer Clan: Bird Clan:
(hit enter 7 x’s) Wolf Clan: Amazing Warriors Protectors of the people Where Chiefs came from Deer Clan: Fast runners Excellent trackers Great hunters Bird Clan: Skilled bird hunters Keeper of the birds Master messengers Wild Potato Clan: Farmers of the wild potato Protectors of earth Great hunters Speaker Notes-Copies of this slide will go on each table to represent one of the 7 Cherokee Clans. Please review this slide before beginning the project. This slide is color coded and they should work their particular clan color into the design of their bandolier bag. Hit enter to start the 7 sided sacred symbol in motion. Hit enter 6 times total to move through all the clans. Long Hair Clan: Keepers of traditions Best teachers Wore their hair twisted or braided Paint Clan: Makers of red paint for war and ceremonies Shaman, Medicine Men and Priests Smallest and most secretive clan Blue Clan: Keepers of special blue medicine to keep children well Guardians of medical herbs

14 Distinct Designs Remember that what makes the beadwork of the Southeastern Woodland Indians stand out are the floral and curving designs and patterns. These are different from the triangles and straight lines used by Native American artists from other parts of the country. Some examples are:

15 Project Art EDventures
Sew Your Seams Use the white yarn to “sew” your pouch together. Thread your yarn through a hole, then loop it around the outer edges of the bag, then back through the next hole. When you have closed all your seams, tie the ends of the thread together to create your shoulder strap. Distinctive Designs Look at the examplesof floral and curving designs on the sheet on your table and select a few to decorate your bandolier bag. Choose some beads and arrange them on your bag. Use the tacky glue to stick the beads to the bag. Only a little glue is needed for each bead! Don’t worry, the glue will dry clear! Your Clan Color Look at the clan assigned to your table. Use your tribe’s color in your design. Build Your Bag Take your brown paper bag and make sure the flap which covers the pouch is folded down in front. Use a hole punch to make holes around the edge of the folded bag. Draw The Paw Sign your name and “Draw the Paw” on the back of your bag before you begin beading. This will let others know your bandolier bag is an Art EDventures creation! You can add your clan name too: Deer Wolf Bird Wild Potato Long Hair War Paint Blue

16 Supply List Heavy Brown Packaging Paper-pre-cut into the pattern for the bags. (One per child.) White Yarn-pre cut into 6 foot lengths (one per child.) Pony Beads –in the colors of the Cherokee Clans-brown, blue, green, red, white and yellow. (One bowl per table.) Quick Dry Tacky Glue-several per table. Hole Punches-(several per table.) Markers or Pencils-for signing their names. (Several per table) Table Handouts-laminated Woodland Indian design sheets and the 7 Sacred Cherokee Clan table markers.

17 G.P.S. Ties SS2H2 The student will describe the Georgia Creek and Cherokee cultures of the past in terms of tools, clothing, homes, ways of making a living, and accomplishments. a. Describe the regions in Georgia where the Creeks and Cherokees lived and how the people used their local resources. b. Compare and contrast the Georgia Creek and Cherokee cultures of the past to Georgians today. SS2G2 The student will describe the cultural and geographic systems associated with the historical figures in SS2H1 and Georgia’s Creeks and Cherokees. SS2H1 The student will read about and describe the lives of historical figures in Georgia history. a. Identify the contributions made by these historic figures: James Oglethorpe, Tomochichi, and Mary Musgrove (founding of Georgia); Sequoyah (development of a Cherokee alphabet); Jackie Robinson (sports); Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights); Jimmy Carter (leadership and human rights). b. Describe how everyday life of these historical figures is similar to and different from everyday life in the present (food, clothing, homes, transportation, communication, recreation, rights, and freedoms).

18 Art EDventures Made possible with your donations to S.H.E.’s PTA
Dear Mom, Dad or Caretaker, Today we learned about Martha Berry, an award-winning Cherokee bead artist. I learned that the Cherokee originally lived in the northern parts of Georgia and other southeastern states. Did you know that they used beads to create beautiful designs on their clothing and bags? In fact, Martha Berry uses the “old-style” techniques of the Southeastern Woodland Indians and is best known for her elaborately beaded bandolier bags. We also looked at her art for stories, patterns and symbols which have special meanings to the Cherokee. After, we divided into the seven Cherokee clans, we used the clan color in our Art EDventure project--a beaded bandolier bag. Ask me about my design and which clan I belonged to for the day! Martha Berry Dear Mom, Dad or Caretaker, Today we learned about Martha Berry, an award-winning Cherokee bead artist. I learned that the Cherokee originally lived in the northern parts of Georgia and other southeastern states. Did you know that they used beads to create beautiful designs on their clothing and bags? In fact, Martha Berry uses the “old-style” techniques of the Southeastern Woodland Indians and is best known for her elaborately beaded bandolier bags. We also looked at her art for stories, patterns and symbols which have special meanings to the Cherokee. After, we divided into the seven Cherokee clans, we used a clan color in our Art EDventure project--a beaded bandolier bag. Ask me about my design and which clan I belonged to for the day! Bandolier Bag Martha Berry Bandolier Bag


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