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Wapwallopen (Pa.) Indians Tribes Greg Myers Building Online Collarorative Environments.

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Presentation on theme: "Wapwallopen (Pa.) Indians Tribes Greg Myers Building Online Collarorative Environments."— Presentation transcript:

1 Wapwallopen (Pa.) Indians Tribes Greg Myers Building Online Collarorative Environments

2 Other Tribes in the East The group of Native American known as the Woodland Indians is made up of several tribes. These are some of the major tribes. The group of Native American known as the Woodland Indians is made up of several tribes. These are some of the major tribes. DelawareWapwallopen Huron NarragansetPowhatan Iroquois Mohawk Oneida Onondaga Cayuga Seneca Tuscarora

3 Location of the Tribes These tribes lived east of the Plains in the forest areas along the eastern part of the United States. They lived there long before the Europeans came to this continent. The people of these tribes found everything they needed to live in the forest. These tribes lived east of the Plains in the forest areas along the eastern part of the United States. They lived there long before the Europeans came to this continent. The people of these tribes found everything they needed to live in the forest.

4 Location of the Wapwallopen Tribe Wapwallopen is located in Northeastern Pennsylvania on the banks of the Susquehanna River. Wapwallopen is also surrounded by the Council Cup Mountains. Wapwallopen is located in Northeastern Pennsylvania on the banks of the Susquehanna River. Wapwallopen is also surrounded by the Council Cup Mountains.

5 Map of the area the Eastern Woodland Indians lived.

6 Wapwallopen The town of Wapwallopen can be accessed by clicking here: Wapwallopen The town of Wapwallopen can be accessed by clicking here: WapwallopenWapwallopen

7 Native American Voices & Language Living Voices Living Voices Living Voices Living Voices

8 Native American Clothing Their clothing was made mostly from hides of animals. In the winter, the men wore shirts, leggings, and moccasins made of buckskin. Buckskin is clothing made from the skins of animals, mainly deer. The women wore skirts they had woven from the wild grasses, covered with furs, with leggings underneath. Their clothing was made mostly from hides of animals. In the winter, the men wore shirts, leggings, and moccasins made of buckskin. Buckskin is clothing made from the skins of animals, mainly deer. The women wore skirts they had woven from the wild grasses, covered with furs, with leggings underneath.

9 The Great Chain, or Covenant Belt, is generally thought to be a belt presented by the U.S. government to the Iroquois in 1794 at the Pickering Treaty at Canandaigua, N.Y. Adapted from The Native Americans. Edited by B. & I. Ballantine. 1993 This is a sample of a wampum belt.

10 Food Many of the Eastern Woodland tribes hunted small game such as deer, rabbit, and bear. Since their villages were usually near the ocean, streams, or lakes, they also fished using spears and nets. Berries, nuts, and wild plants were important forms of food. Many of these tribes were considered to be excellent farmers. They had large farms which grew corn, beans, and squash. Many of the Eastern Woodland tribes hunted small game such as deer, rabbit, and bear. Since their villages were usually near the ocean, streams, or lakes, they also fished using spears and nets. Berries, nuts, and wild plants were important forms of food. Many of these tribes were considered to be excellent farmers. They had large farms which grew corn, beans, and squash.

11 Food Corn, beans, and squash were the most important crops planted. They were know as “The Three Sisters” as they were also grown together. Corn, beans, and squash were the most important crops planted. They were know as “The Three Sisters” as they were also grown together.

12 Shelter The Iroquois Indians lived in wigwams and longhouses.

13 Tools Snowshoes made winter hunting easier for the Iroquois. They traveled up to 50 miles a day wearing the snowshoes in deep snow. The Iroquois also wore snowshoes in ritual dances. Snowshoes made winter hunting easier for the Iroquois. They traveled up to 50 miles a day wearing the snowshoes in deep snow. The Iroquois also wore snowshoes in ritual dances.

14 Tools An ax was created from stones to help with carving, splitting, or chipping wood and stone into the needed items. An ax was created from stones to help with carving, splitting, or chipping wood and stone into the needed items.

15 Tools The bannerstone was used as a weight to produce thrust when throwing a spear. It is believed to have been a prized possession of the chief of the tribe. The bannerstone was used as a weight to produce thrust when throwing a spear. It is believed to have been a prized possession of the chief of the tribe.

16 Tools Arrow points and spear points were carved from flint stone and attached to the shaft for arrows or spears as needed by the men using them.

17 Tools This is a rough stone with an abrasive quality need for the smoothing and straightening the shaft for an arrow or spear. This is a rough stone with an abrasive quality need for the smoothing and straightening the shaft for an arrow or spear.

18 Tools This blade made of brown flint with a sharp edge was used for cutting. Found at Three Bridges near Canton. The scraper is completely flat on one side with sharp cutting edges for scraping fat from the hides of animals or for scaling fish.

19 Pots were made using clay coils, etched with sticks and other things, and fired in coals.

20 Broken pots could be mended. Broken sides were drilled, the pieces bound together with sinew and glued with pine pitch. Such mended vessels were then used for the storage of dried foods. Broken pots could be mended. Broken sides were drilled, the pieces bound together with sinew and glued with pine pitch. Such mended vessels were then used for the storage of dried foods.

21 Visit the Interactive Museum to view Native Artifacts Lost Worlds Lost Worlds

22 Sample Native American Music Native American Radio Native American Radio Native Pow Wow Inaguration Native Pow Wow Inaguration

23 Bibliography http://www.co.cumberland.nj.us/facts/history/unalachtigo/unalachtigo.html http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/native.html http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/native.htmlhttp://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/native.html http://www.lostworlds.org http://www.nativetech.org/scenes http://www.picadome.fcps.net/lab/currl/nativeam/primary.htm http://www.nativeculturelinks.com/media.html http://www.nativetech.org/wampum/wamphist.htm http://www.nmai.si.edu/livingvoices/ http://www.nmai.si.edu/livingvoices/ http://www.cnwl.igs.net/~ckon/


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