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+ The Practice of Statistics, 4 th edition – For AP* STARNES, YATES, MOORE Chapter 3: Describing Relationships Section 3.1 Scatterplots and Correlation.

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Presentation on theme: "+ The Practice of Statistics, 4 th edition – For AP* STARNES, YATES, MOORE Chapter 3: Describing Relationships Section 3.1 Scatterplots and Correlation."— Presentation transcript:

1 + The Practice of Statistics, 4 th edition – For AP* STARNES, YATES, MOORE Chapter 3: Describing Relationships Section 3.1 Scatterplots and Correlation

2 + Explanatory and Response VariablesMost statistical studies examine data on more than one variable. In many ofthese settings, the two variables play different roles. Definition: A response variable measures an outcome of a study. An explanatory variable may help explain or influence changes in a response variable. Note: In many studies, the goal is to show that changes in one or more explanatory variables actually cause changes in a response variable. However, other explanatory-response relationships don’t involve direct causation.

3 + Example 1: Julie asks, “Can I predict a state’s mean SAT Math score if I know its mean SAT Critical Reading score?” Jim wants to know how the mean SAT Math and Critical Reading scores this year in the 50 states are related to each other. For each student, identify the explanatory variable and the response variable if possible. Julie is treating the mean SAT Critical Reading score as the explanatory variable and the mean SAT Math score as the response variable. Jim is simply interested in exploring the relationship between the two variables. For him, there is no clear explanatory or response variable.

4 + Displaying Relationships: ScatterplotsThe most useful graph for displaying the relationship between two quantitativevariables is a scatterplot. Definition: A scatterplot shows the relationship between two quantitative variables measured on the same individuals. The values of one variable appear on the horizontal axis, and the values of the other variable appear on the vertical axis. Each individual in the data appears as a point on the graph. *Decide which variable should go on each axis. Remember, the eXplanatory variable goes on the X-axis! *Label and scale your axes. *Plot individual data values. How to Make a Scatterplot

5 + Since Body weight is our eXplanatory variable, be sure to place it on the x-axis! Body weight (lb) Backpack weight (lb) Example 2: Ninth-grade students at the Webb Schools go on a backpacking trip each fall. Students are divided into hiking groups of size 8 by selecting names from a hat. Before leaving, students and their backpacks are weighed. Make a scatterplot of the relationship between body weight and pack weight. Here are data from one hiking group in a recent year:

6 + Interpreting ScatterplotsTo interpret a scatterplot, follow the basic strategy of data analysis fromChapters 1 and 2. Look for patterns and important departures from thosepatterns. As in any graph of data, look for the overall pattern and for striking departures from that pattern. You can describe the overall pattern of a scatterplot by the direction, form, and strength of the relationship. An important kind of departure is an outlier, an individual value that falls outside the overall pattern of the relationship. How to Examine a Scatterplot

7 + DirectionFormStrength Outlier There is one possible outlier, the hiker with the body weight of 187 pounds seems to be carrying relatively less weight than are the other group members. There is a moderately strong, positive, linear relationship between body weight and pack weight. It appears that lighter students are carrying lighter backpacks. Example 3: In the last example, we constructed the scatterplot shown that displays the body weights and backpack weights of a group of hikers. Describe what the scatterplot reveals about the relationship between body weight and pack weight.

8 + Definition: Two variables have a positive association when above-average values of one tend to accompany above-average values of the other, and when below- average values also tend to occur together. Two variables have a negative association when above-average values of one tend to accompany below-average values of the other. Example 4: Interpret the scatterplot. DirectionFormStrength There is a moderately strong, negative, curved relationship between the percent of students in a state who take the SAT and the mean SAT math score. Further, there are two distinct clusters of states and two possible outliers that fall outside the overall pattern.

9 + Measuring Linear Association: Correlation*A scatterplot displays the strength, direction, and form of the relationship betweentwo quantitative variables.*Linear relationships are important because a straight line is a simple pattern that isquite common. Unfortunately, our eyes are not good judges of how strong a linearrelationship is. Definition: The correlation r measures the strength of the linear relationship between two quantitative variables. *r is always a number between –1 and 1 inclusive. *r > 0 indicates a positive association. *r < 0 indicates a negative association. *Values of r near 0 indicate a very weak linear relationship. *The strength of the linear relationship increases as r moves away from 0 towards –1 or 1. *The extreme values r = – 1 and r = 1 occur only in the case of a perfect linear relationship.

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11 + CorrelationThe formula for r is a bit complex. It helps us to see what correlation is, but in practice, you should use your calculator or software to find r. Suppose that we have data on variables x and y for n individuals. The values for the first individual are x 1 and y 1, the values for the second individual are x 2 and y 2, and so on. The means and standard deviations of the two variables are x-bar and s x for the x- values and y-bar and s y for the y-values. The correlation r between x and y is: How to Calculate the Correlation r

12 + Interpreting correlation Example 5: Our earlier scatterplot of the body weight and pack weight data for the 8 hikers is shown below. For these data, r = a) Interpret the value of r in context. The correlation of confirms what we see in the scatterplot: there is a moderately strong, positive linear relationship between body weight and backpack weight for these 8 hikers. b) What effect would removing the hiker with the heaviest body weight from the data have on the correlation? Justify your answer. Removing the outlier would increase the correlation since the remaining 7 points are more tightly clustered in a linear pattern.

13 + AP EXAM TIP: If you’re asked to interpret a correlation, start by looking at a scatterplot of the data. Then be sure to address direction, form, strength, and outliers (sound familiar?) and to put your answer in context. Be careful: a value of r close to 1 or −1 does not guarantee a linear relationship between two variables. A scatterplot with a clear curved form can have a correlation that’s near 1 or −1. Always plot your data!

14 + Facts about CorrelationHow correlation behaves is more important than the details of the formula. Here aresome important facts about r. 1. Correlation makes no distinction between explanatory and response variables. It makes no difference which variable you call x and which you call y in calculating the correlation. 2. r does not change when we change the units of measurement of x, y, or both. Measuring height in centimeters rather than inches and weight in kilograms rather than pounds does not change the correlation between height and weight. 3. The correlation r itself has no unit of measurement. It is just a number. Cautions: Correlation requires that both variables be quantitative. Correlation does not describe curved relationships between variables, no matter how strong the relationship is. Correlation is not resistant. r is strongly affected by a few outlying observations. Correlation is not a complete summary of two-variable data.

15 + Correlation PracticeExample 5: For each graph, estimate the correlation r and interpret it in context. The correlation is about 0.9. There is a strong, positive linear relationship between the number of boats registered in Florida and the number of manatees killed.

16 + The correlation is about 0.5. There is a moderate, positive linear relationship between the number of named storms predicted and the actual number of named storms.

17 + The correlation is about 0.3. There is a weak, positive linear relationship between the healing rate of the two front limbs of the newts.

18 + The correlation is about −0.1. There is a weak, negative linear relationship between last year’s percent return and this year’s percent return in the stock market.


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